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Cell Phone Spying: Is Your Life Being Monitored?

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posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 02:11 PM
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The new generation

Long gone are the days of simple wiretapping, when the worst your phone could do was let someone listen in to your conversations. The new generation of cell phone spying tools provides a lot more power.

Eavesdropping is easy. All it takes is a two-minute software install and someone can record your calls and monitor your text messages. They can even set up systems to be automatically alerted when you dial a certain number, then instantly patched into your conversation. Anyone who can perform a basic internet search can find the tools and figure out how to do it in no time.

But the scarier stuff is what your phone can do when you aren’t even using it. Let’s start with your location.


Read More




posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 02:13 PM
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We all know they can track us by our cell phones.

But whats even more alarming is that this same technology is going into identification cards which will be mandatory to carry.....they will need to be with you at all times.

or worse a chip within us we cant get rid of...

there wont be any anonymity .



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 02:24 PM
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Why not consider something like these produts....

RFID BLOCKING WALLETS

OR THIS

OR THIS

OR THIS

My point is..... It doesn't matter what they come up with, there is always someone smarter who can figure a way around it.



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 02:29 PM
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If a government agency really wants to know my whereabouts, they would follow me around, regardless of whether or not they could track my cell phone or lap top. I don't see what the big deal is.



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 02:33 PM
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Cell phone? pffft..my new ATM card has a chip in it.



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 02:41 PM
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Originally posted by stevegmu
If a government agency really wants to know my whereabouts, they would follow me around, regardless of whether or not they could track my cell phone or lap top. I don't see what the big deal is.


The big deal is that we have a right to privacy.

Wait don't tell me, I shouldn't have be worried about this if I don't have anything to hide, right?




posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 02:45 PM
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For over 20 years, all communications worldwide are recorded. In North America for instance it is called Eschelon and is run by the NSA. The software used to track and record all communications on American networks is Israeli. Go figure!


"ECHELON was capable of interception and content inspection of telephone calls, fax, e-mail and other data traffic globally through the interception of communication bearers including satellite transmission, public switched telephone networks (which carry most Internet traffic) and microwave links"
en.wikipedia.org...

"What is less well-known is that AT&T and Verizon handed "the bugging of their entire networks -- carrying billions of American communications every day" to two companies founded in Israel. Verint and Narus, as they are called, are "superintrusive -- conducting mass surveillance on both international and domestic communications 24/7," and sifting traffic at "key Internet gateways" around the US."
electronicintifada.net...



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 02:54 PM
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Originally posted by lucentenigma

Originally posted by stevegmu
If a government agency really wants to know my whereabouts, they would follow me around, regardless of whether or not they could track my cell phone or lap top. I don't see what the big deal is.


The big deal is that we have a right to privacy.

Wait don't tell me, I shouldn't have be worried about this if I don't have anything to hide, right?



If a government agency were so interested in you, they would have a handful of surveillance warrants, have genuine wire-taps and the cooperation of your carrier. They would use their own, professional equipment, not gadgets built-in to cell-phones. The chip in your phone would be a moot issue, if they were interested in you.



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 03:05 PM
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I got one of those "calling card" T-mobile phones but then it never activated after I called in to activate it. Everything worked out on my end but the phone never sent back to the confirmation number.

I still have the phone in my room but I'm going to get rid of it because who knows....



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 03:08 PM
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Originally posted by stevegmu
If a government agency were so interested in you, they would have a handful of surveillance warrants, have genuine wire-taps and the cooperation of your carrier. They would use their own, professional equipment, not gadgets built-in to cell-phones. The chip in your phone would be a moot issue, if they were interested in you.


Did you read Wormwood Squirms post?

Warrants are not needed and that is a slap in the face of our constitutional rights.


The NSA warrantless surveillance controversy concerns surveillance of persons within the United States incident to the collection of foreign intelligence by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) as part of the war on terror. Under this program, referred to by the Bush administration as the "terrorist surveillance program",[1] part of the broader President's Surveillance Program, the NSA is authorized by executive order to monitor, without warrants, phone calls, e-mails, Internet activity, and text messaging, and other communication involving any party believed by the NSA to be outside the U.S., even if the other end of the communication lies within the U.S.



The Supreme Court held in Katz v. United States (1967), that the monitoring and recording of private conversations within the United States constitutes a "search" for Fourth Amendment purposes, and therefore the government must generally obtain a warrant before undertaking such domestic wiretapping.


NSA Wire Tapping



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 03:20 PM
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reply to post by lucentenigma
 


Yes, I have read all the corresponding material. I am an American citizen, and don't make a habit of calling Al-Qaeda in Iraq, Afghanistan, or wherever else they may have bases. Nothing to fear.



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