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Transformation of the Pledge of Allegiance

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posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 03:33 PM
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The Pledge of Allegiance

I am a foreigner, and I will forever be a foreigner in the eyes of any American due to my race.

I remember coming to America in 3rd grade, every morning the principal and teachers would tell every school children to stand up, look at the flag of the United States, and recite the Pledge of Allegiance. I did not know the words, so I had to learn it slowly. I do not remember doing any of these daily patriotic crap in Germany and even in China.

In middle school, none of my teachers really cared, and no one stood up in the morning other than a few "outliers."

In high school, everyone started doing this "Allegiance" pledge again. You know what?

I didn't, and the consequence was people calling me "Commie" or "traitor."

I used to be in the Internationale Baccalaureate program which was expected, at least by me, to be tolerant. And because of the hostility of American born children towards my indifference for patriotism, I promised that I will never do this "Pledge of Allegiance" or any meaningless patriotic crap.


So why did I stop in the first place?

-Laziness
-Content

Let's take a look at the history of the Pledge of Allegiance

Wikipedia:



Official versions (changes in bold italics)

1892
“I pledge allegiance to my flag and the republic for which it stands: one nation indivisible with liberty and justice for all.”

1892 to 1923
"I pledge allegiance to my flag and to the republic that he represents: one nation indivisible with liberty and justice for all."

1923 to 1924
"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States and to the republic for which it stands: one nation indivisible with liberty and justice for all."

1924 to 1954
"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands; one nation indivisible with liberty and justice for all."

1954 to Present
"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the republic for which it stands: one nation under God, indivisible with liberty and justice for all.



So, how did we go from a flag, to the flag of the United States, to the flag of the United States of America?

Why was "Under God" added? Are we not suppose to be a nation where the state and religion are separated? Why did Eisenhower allow some Catholic organization to do this?


After starting my researches into controversial topics, I realize how absurd and backward government induced patriotism is and how even the "brightest" people are so damn simple.


Oh yah, I don't pledge an allegiance to a government that does not care about me and even shows even less respect for other countries.

[edit on 9/9/2009 by die_another_day]




posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 03:50 PM
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I must have been lucky. The only times I ever had to say the Pledge of Allegiance was at Sports Games and Boy Scout Meetings. We learned the Pledge in school but I don't recall us ever doing the Pledge of Allegiance in school. (I do understand it is State law for it to be said in Public Classrooms daily, but thankfully not all States have such laws!)

However, I do recall that if you chose not to stand or salute or at least pretend to say the Pledge of Allegiance at sporting events you wouldn't be called "commie" or "traitor" but you would get the tarnation beaten out of you by a couple of angry drunken (but "patriotic") red-necks (probably the reason I stopped taking any interest in Sports whatsoever).

To me the Flag is a symbol. It is not an idol. Worshiping it seems countra-intelligent to me.

To recite a Christian Socialist Pledge to prove your loyalty or allegiance to a Nation seems rather Imperialistic and grossly anachronistic if you ask me.

Now "Equality, Liberty and Justice" ('equality' originally was to be included in the Pledge, but Francis Bellamy knew that the state superintendents of education on his committee were against equality for women and African Americans) all are things that I think the truly Patriot and true Americans should extol on a daily basis. Rather than pledge oneself to a Nation or a Government or a Symbol such as a Flag, I think pledging oneself to the ideals for which those things supposedly stand to be far more important.

(And who told you that you will always remain a foreigner in America because of your race? Whoever said that was clearly not an American in the truest sense of the word, but rather an uneducated, xenophobic racist who thinks you have to be inbred to be American. As far as I am concerned, you already make a fine American for being willing to question the Pledge of Allegiance, learning of it's History, and exercising your unalienable Freedom and Right to not say it!)

[edit on 9-9-2009 by fraterormus]



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 04:02 PM
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Good for you for not pledging! I had long been aware of the "under
God" part being added and refused to do it. But that was back in the
"70's and rebellion wasn't treated so harshly. Sorry to hear that your
classmates were idiotic brutes towards you.
A flag is a symbol, hence NOT the real thing. Plus the flag has
changed many, many times. I would pledge allegiance to our
country, our constitution but never a symbol.
If you research a bit more you will also find that the original "salute"
to the flag looked very much like the "heil hitler" salute - I kid you
not.
We all know real patriotism can't be measured or enforced. It
only becomes known when the need arises and that's usually when
the timid (the people who blindly obey) will run to save their own
butts.
Good thread, S&F. Keep following your conscience, America needs
more people like you!



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 04:39 PM
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Thanks guys, glad to find people that I can have an intelligent conversation with today.



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 07:35 PM
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I remember I used to say it diligently every morning in class, probably up until high school. Around ninth grade I started getting into the details of government, conspiracies and what not, and it ended up being a couple of long years of high school.

Probably about the middle of ninth grade I refused to stand for the pledge for the first time, and my homeroom teacher gave me a few words (she was Civics teacher) and I ended up standing regardless. Over time I became more rebellious and just outright refused until she forced me out of the room every time I didn't do it. I got used to it after awhile, and after the time and she let me back in knowing that I wasn't going to change.

I remember a few times standing for it and reciting my own pledge in its stead:

"I pledge allegiance, to the the flag, of the United States of America, and for the republic - in which it used to stand - one nation, ruled by few, where liberty and justice are flawed."


I was proud when a few like minded people joined me in reciting that in our later years. I'll be damned if I pledge allegiance to a government I don't believe in, and a symbol that they have desecrated for so long. The Constitution is the only thing that gains my allegiance.



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 08:31 PM
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I never was comfortable saying it in school either.

It seemed odd pledging your allegiance(didn't even no what that meant) to the land you were born, or why you needed to.

When I found out later it was written by a Socialist I actually refused to and stopped participating. I would stand but that is it.

No one said a thing.

Thankfully they changed the hand placement during the Pledge.

It used to be this.



Obama will probably have them change it back.



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by calcoastseeker
 


Do you have any proof for that pic?

That is interesting. I had never heard that before.



posted on Sep, 10 2009 @ 09:13 AM
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Thanks for this thread! It's interesting to think of how this will evolve in the future. My imagination and paranoia are running with this concept. I'm not entirely sure, but I'm rather confident that the new pledge will have "United States of America" removed.

Replaced with "The North American Union" or "Trilateral League" I bet. Anyone else have a suggestion of what pessimistic pledge in the future would look like? Perhaps a positive one as well?



posted on Sep, 10 2009 @ 09:23 AM
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What symbolizes our country more, a flag or the Constitution?

I wouldn't give two squirts of piss for our flag. I keep one handy in the bathroom just in case I run low on Toilet Paper.

Our constitution on the other hand, I'll die defending it. Probably sooner than later with the way things are heating up.

So my question is, Why not I pledge Allegiance to the Constitution of the United States Of America and the Ideals contained within.......blahhhh blahhhh blahhhh.....some other stuff........done!?????


[edit on 10-9-2009 by Jesus H Christ]



posted on Sep, 10 2009 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by Jesus H Christ
 


Another thing that I don't get is defamation of a flag.

How would the government know that I have toilet paper with each ply the color and shape of the US flag?

You see people burn US flags in other countries, but when WE do it in the US, it's an act of terrorism. It gets us jailed, fined, and defaced in the media.



posted on Sep, 10 2009 @ 05:49 PM
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Originally posted by die_another_day
Another thing that I don't get is defamation of a flag.

How would the government know that I have toilet paper with each ply the color and shape of the US flag?

You see people burn US flags in other countries, but when WE do it in the US, it's an act of terrorism. It gets us jailed, fined, and defaced in the media.


An Act of Congress made it illegal, however even though it was appealed to the Supreme Court before it went it to effect, it still took 5 years for the Supreme Court to rule that the law was Unconstitutional, and that burning the Flag of the United States is indeed protected under the First Amendment (Texas vs. Johnson 1984 and United States vs. Eichman, 1990).

If someone imprisons you for burning a flag in the United States you'd have the ACLU offering to go to bat for you, along with every ambulance-chaser lawyer in the United States.

However, even if it is your right to do such, you will still probably get the tarnation beaten out of you by the local VFW and any Vets who saw you. To many it is considered a sacred icon and the thought of people burning it is considered one of the greatest of crimes (even if it isn't a crime, but your protected Right).



posted on Sep, 10 2009 @ 05:55 PM
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Originally posted by Lemon.Fresh
Do you have any proof for that pic?

That is interesting. I had never heard that before.


The Bellamy Salute, as shown in the photograph, is indeed true.

The Bellamy Salute (or Flag Salute) was used during the Pledge of Allegience in the United States from October 12th 1897 until F.D.R. instituted the Hand-Over-Heart Salute (and made official when Congress adopted the Flag Code on June 22nd 1942).



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