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West Coast Salmon vanish - again.

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posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 09:25 PM
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Greetings all,

I've been following the recent breaking news on the BC Salmon and thought I'd share the story with you guys.

Salmon vanish - Experts can't explain

It seems as though, the BC Salmon industry could be facing an unprecedented recession of its own.

It has no fish... roughly 10 % of what was expected to come up river...

This is staggering news, and frightening to say the least.

Upon searching to find if anything was posted about this, I managed to find an old thread on here from 2008.... stating the same scenario, only in California!!!

Sacramento River Salmon Thread - circa 2008

"The Chinook salmon that swim upstream to spawn in the fall, the most robust run in the Sacramento River, have disappeared. The almost complete collapse of the richest and most dependable source of Chinook salmon south of Alaska left gloomy fisheries experts struggling for reliable explanations — and coming up dry."


I'm wondering how the population of salmon in the Sacramento is doing now, a year later....

Rare and Royal Salmon Vanish Again

"six-hour trolls without a bite; little coho salmon; kings only available to fishermen with the gear to fish deep. " - John Driscoll - Times Standard

What is happening to these fish?





posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 09:42 PM
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I recently went fishing on Vancouver Island near Port Hardy. while I didnt catch anything except garbage Bullheads, I saw many people pull nice Pinks and Coho out. I saw salmon schooling by the thousands. While I can't explain why they aren't making it upstream I can say that I saw many many salmon. From what I saw in my time there It looked like the salmon were faring well. I did not however see any chinooks.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 09:44 PM
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Awesome Red..

That's good news to hear...

At least they're still lurking nearby



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 09:47 PM
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reply to post by GioTheGreek
 

I also think that the journey up river often depends on rain if there isn't enough water in the waterways for the salmon to make it they simply won't. I have heard that it has been a dry BC summer so this may be the explanation.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 09:58 PM
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I wonder how the weather has been in Northern California for the last couple of years... hot as well? Dry? Not enough water in the river?

You'd think that these marine biologists wouldn't overlook something as simple as the dry weather affecting the river depth, but they may have!

You could be onto something red...



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 09:58 PM
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There's plenty of salmon, it's just the one sockeye fishery that collapsed. Not to imply that it's not an issue, it is.

It's a bit startling, this was supposed to have been a large run and there's a lot of people who will be facing some lean times without it. There's been some confrontations on the river between First Nation fishermen and sports fishermen as they beat each other up in a race to catch the very last fish and drive the run into total collapse.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 10:00 PM
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Ah okay... thanks for clarifiying Super Mod


Chinook and Sockeye are the same thing no? Or am I way off...

All I know is Atlantic Salmon here in New Brunswick



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 10:07 PM
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reply to post by GioTheGreek
 


Oh not being a supermod here, just a member. It's a topic I have a personal stake in.


Chinook and sockeye are different species of salmon. Sockeye is worth considerably more money than any other kind, which is why this will hurt people who have licences for that area. Chinook (the largest) are the salmon of choice for sports fishermen and sockeye is what commercial fishermen want.

The idea about water levels is a good one, but these fish were supposed to come from the ocean at the end of their four year cycle to spawn and they haven't shown up. They never reached the areas of the Fraser where water level would be an issue.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 10:13 PM
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Chinook have been in decline due to the ice cold bottom lake waters exiting the base of Shasta Dam. Salmon don't like that ice cold water, and it has been reducing their numbers on the winter run. Dams are great for flood control, but bad for salmon spawning.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 10:56 PM
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"The west coast salmon fishery supports some 52,000 jobs. "

That's staggering...

That means the majority of these people will be out of work this year?

90 % or so?




posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:07 PM
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reply to post by GioTheGreek
 


I dunno about percentages but I talked to a few fisherman while I was on the Island and they seemed pretty busy.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:14 PM
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reply to post by Duzey
 


Should also note that in oregon.. there's been battles between sea lions and the fishermen. (With one instance where a fishermen shot a sea lion in the head when it stole the one salmon he had caught that day.

Also very unfortunate because some of the indian populations once did well because of the salmon they could catch, which is no longer the case.

I also probably won't be catching any this year either



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:18 PM
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Dead zones are one thing to watch out for. This will happen where rivers run into the ocean and carry agricultural run off. They might not be making it into the mouth of the river.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:31 PM
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reply to post by GioTheGreek
 


I don't think they'll all be out of work. The average person working in the industry that isn't a fisherman will be fine.

It's the gillnetters that are going to hurt the most, money wise. They are small operators that don't generally have the support of a large company behind them, which means that the biggest asset they own and have everything mortgaged against, their Area C salmon licence, isn't worth the money it cost to print the tabs and they don't have someone giving them an Area D licence to use instead. I'm sure the govt will get a lot of applications for the buyback this year, but again - who knows if they'll get what back what they paid for them.

It really hurts the bands who live on the river because it's a subsistence fishery for them which means they now have to find money to buy food.

reply to post by Miraj
 


That makes me sad. I know many fishermen think sea lions/seals are horrible rodents but it isn't their fault the fish aren't around. I say save the nastiness for the poachers with their factory ships and the countries that support them.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:38 PM
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I live in BC and there are salmon running galore right now. My buddy caught 14 himself in one day on the island last weekend and everyone fishing here near me is catching them left right and center. right now it is an odd year so the Pinks are running like mad but also Chinook and Coho are plenty.


[edit on 7-9-2009 by Wormwood Squirm]



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:47 PM
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There is a huge resurgence off Vancouver Island this year. Looks like some of those hatchery programs on the island paid off.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:58 PM
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reply to post by Duzey
 


Yeah the island has tons this year. I am in Squamish near Vancouver on Howe Sound and there are tons of fisherman out right now going berserk but ever since the caustic soda spill a few years back daily limits are no keep (0) in this area.



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 12:08 AM
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reply to post by Duzey
 


to the hatchery programs.

to the salmon farms.



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 12:24 AM
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The hatchery programs raise the salmon fry in a controlled environment until their large enough to release into the wild. This gives them a head start out of the gates to go out into the pacific and feed. Eventually they come back and are recovered by a seiner, gillnetter, or troller and sold on the market. We sport fisherman even get a whack at them.

Farmed fish are raised in huge pens until they are sold on the market. They are fed fish meal that contains a red dye to color the flesh so they look like a salmon are supposed to. This inferior product in my opinion is one of the reasons the market is so low on salmon right now. A flooded market of farmed fish, and huge frozen inventories are also to blame.

Another angle is that the Canadians are raising Atlantic salmon in some of these pens. There was a mass breakout a while back at one of the farms and the Atlantic Salmon were freed into the pacific. To my knowledge there has been no longitudinal study on the effects of this foreign species to the pacific ecosystem. Data's still out I'm sure.

Point is, people are messing around with the pacific food cycle and they shouldn't be. I'm all for laying off the Species for a year and letting some recovery take place.

[edit on 8-9-2009 by The Undertaker]

[edit on 8-9-2009 by The Undertaker]



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 10:20 PM
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I place the blame of the disappearance of the Sockeye Salmon run this year squarely on the shoulders of our BC provincial government.

They have been too wrapped up in the immoral 2010 Vancouver Olympics and with trying to find money to fund them to care about the environment.

Case in point...They have been plotting in secret to ram through a revenue generating scheme that involves an untested technology that they want to place upstream from Vancouver. Yes folks! They are trying to push a huge Incinerator that will burn creosote railway ties from all over N. America in a small city north of here called Kamloops.

Railways have been doing away with using wood ties because of the toxicity of creosote that they are soaked in. Now the BC Liberals (Liberal is a misnomer here) plans to burn this stuff up. This will spew toxins into the air and water and right into the spawning grounds of said fish.

Even while the good men and women of the Kamloops city council with the backing of hundreds of Kamloops residents have rejected this proposal....the BC government can still move it forward. The BC government owns our air and can do what they want with it!
Go here for more info:
savekamloops.ca...
www.thepetitionsite.com...




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