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Airplane view of Mars

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posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 02:20 AM
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I knew what I was going to say till I saw pluckey's avatar.


Anyways, nice pics on this thread.

Will have to bookmark the link that isn't working.




posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 02:54 AM
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Originally posted by mopusvindictus
They have it now labeled as geysers, which is current theory... Really interesting though, actual geysers? implies internal heat, melting atmospheric discharge from within the planet...



HiRise has been around for some time... we have several threads using HiRise images...

As to the Geysers....

Mars has CO₂ Ice... underneath it is a black sand...

When the sun heats the ice it sublimates from the bottom up. actually levitating the ice flow...

When holes start to form to the surface, the pressure release blows out the gas and takes black sand with it...

The effect looks like THIS


Caption
Sand-laden jets shoot into the polar sky in this view by noted space artist Ron Miller. It shows the Martian south polar icecap as southern spring begins.



Geysers spewing sand and dust hundreds of feet into the "air" have been discovered on Mars, scientists say. Images from a camera orbiting Mars have shown the 100 mph jets of carbon dioxide erupt through ice at the planet's south pole, Arizona State University says.

The orbiting camera, called the Thermal Emission Imaging System (Themis), is on the Mars Odyssey probe.The geyser debris leaves dark spots, fan-like markings and spider-shaped features on the ice cap.

The scientists said geysers erupted when sunlight warming the ice turned frozen carbon dioxide underground into high-pressure gas.

"If you were there, you'd be standing on a slab of carbon dioxide ice," said the university's Dr Phil Christensen."All around you, roaring jets of CO2 gas are throwing sand and dust a couple of hundred feet into the air."

Dr Christensen said the process was "unlike anything that occurs on Earth".

His team discovered the jets through examining more than 200 Themis visible and infrared images. The findings were published in the latest edition of the journal Nature.


Sunday, 20 August 2006
news.bbc.co.uk...







posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 03:00 AM
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Originally posted by mopusvindictus
Funny it took so long for them to admit / confirm the existence of water and now it's simply unloaded... Huge numbers of these images labeled "gullied"


It's because no one pays attention


Just do a search on ATS for 'water on Mars' and see how many times it's been shown






posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 07:15 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Oh yeah they have been talking about them and they have taken a few...

But there is one in ten maybe of these 1500 from what i was seeing, it's not a trickle of proof it's a waterfall (no pun intended)



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 07:20 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Those are some great images....

What do you think of this nonsense though Zorg?

They release 1500 new images and the site goes down and has yet to come up again?

This is either highly unprofessional preparation for people coming to the server or for some reason they decided to retract these at least on a temporary basis.

Disappointing in terms of a nice little thread of new images at the least, I was really looking forward to spending some time over the holiday while I can pouring over these and talking about them with some of the more informed members...



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 07:36 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Let me know btw.. Zorg, if this was just an example of CNN semi misconstruing things or not.

i'm curious if these images are accumulated over the last few months and CNN just posted the link now or if there was a new batch in here as in brand new at all or not

The geysers are simply amazing... fascinating, when did those first come out?

I am normally an avid follower of anything Mars, I of course knew of water and gullies etc... But admittedly been out of the loop these months due to personal issues and been preoccupied around flag and sedona lately having just moved here... regardless if I am johnny come lately these really are amazing images.

please feel free to post other links or send me via u2u



[edit on 7-9-2009 by mopusvindictus]



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 07:54 AM
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reply to post by mopusvindictus
 

The images have been published every week since November 2006 (if my memory is correct), and from time to time they have a large update with the images that were published on the Planetary Data System.

I have all the images published on those weekly releases (last week was release 134), and all the images from the first PDS release in June 2007.

And it's not unusual for their site to stop working of to be extremely slow, at least when accessed from Portugal.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 10:08 AM
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Site is dead.

And if water on mars is a news to someone, he must be living in a cave. We know this since first telescopes were made hundreds of years ago. NASA missions just confirm the observations.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 10:21 AM
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reply to post by rocksolidbrain
 

It depends on what you mean by "water on Mars".

If you are talking about liquid water, as far as I know nobody has ever seen that on Mars, but if you are talking about marks of water from ancient times then yes, there are many of those on Mats.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Yes, I'm talking about the discovery that liquid water once flowed abundantly on Mars. Now nothing remains of it , of course.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by rocksolidbrain
 

OK, I just wanted to know exactly what you meant, I hate misunderstandings.

And the site is working again.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 03:03 PM
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Originally posted by mopusvindictus
What do you think of this nonsense though Zorg?

They release 1500 new images and the site goes down and has yet to come up again?


The images on HiRise are huge... they also have the zoom effect available on hundreds of images.

Now add to that (not counting the science users) all the people worldwide downloading or viewing. HUGE amounts of bandwidth needed

You make one post at ATS and what maybe a 1000 people (the silent viewers) hit the site at the same time?

That has already caused directories and files to be moved in the past and is the reason I won't post a direct link to some sites in the .mil category.

And it is a University computer after all. The ASU computer is also handling all the LRO images (also huge) plus the color Clementine (.cub files of several gigabytes), the Lunar Orbiter and Apollo image revitalization... and more...

And that is only the public stuff

So it is no surprise to me that they would have down times, especially on Holiday weekends



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 03:13 PM
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Originally posted by mopusvindictus
The geysers are simply amazing... fascinating, when did those first come out?


Well not sure exactly without going back but the second image I posted is M07-01830

That is (was) the Mars Global Surveyor and M07 is from 1999...

M07 through M12
September 1999 - February 2000
www.msss.com...

Here is the full size image

M0701830.gif



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 03:35 PM
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Originally posted by rocksolidbrain
Yes, I'm talking about the discovery that liquid water once flowed abundantly on Mars. Now nothing remains of it , of course.


Of course
We all know THAT



Well except the ESA team using Mars Express... seems they have a different story than NASA



August 2, 2005

Life on Mars? Who knows? Ice on Mars? Most definitely—and now we've got more cold, hard evidence.

On Thursday the European Space Agency released a rare photo of a Martian ice lake in the far northern reaches of the planet. Capping a swirl of dunes at the bottom of a 23-mile-wide (35-kilometer-wide) crater, the frozen lake is thought to exist year-round. The modest temperature and pressure changes in this latitude would not be enough to allow the ice to melt or evaporate.

Water, a key ingredient for life, is believed to have once flowed on Mars, etching the gorges that crisscross the red planet. Today water ice is abundant underground, cakes the poles, and may even form frozen, buried seas (see photo). But it is unusual to find lonely patches of ice away from the poles.

The new image, taken by the agency's Mars Express probe, shows largely true colors. But the depth of the crater's ice-fringed, 1.2-mile-deep (2-kilometer-deep) ridges is exaggerated by a factor of three.

—Ted Chamberlain


news.nationalgeographic.com...


Photograph courtesy ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G.Neukum)

Now since we know that surface temperature DOES get above frezzing on Mars for short periods (81 F recorded) then it follows that at some point this ice lake would have liquid water


Water ice in crater at Martian north pole

28 July 2005



These images, taken by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA’s Mars Express spacecraft, show a patch of water ice sitting on the floor of an unnamed crater near the Martian north pole.

The HRSC obtained these images during orbit 1343 with a ground resolution of approximately 15 metres per pixel. The unnamed impact crater is located on Vastitas Borealis, a broad plain that covers much of Mars's far northern latitudes, at approximately 70.5° North and 103° East.


www.esa.int...


But heck... what do those silly Europeans know?


River Delta

Distributory Fan Near Holden Crater
PIA04869




photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov...


Giant Pool of Water Ice at Mars' South Pole
www.space.com...

Frozen Lakes on Mars



Mars Global Surveyor
MOC narrow-angle image R07-01100
Defrosting south polar terrain

Full Image R0701100

One of the frozen lakes on Mars... we just thought it looked better with a little color





Martian River Valleys
www.windows.ucar.edu...=/mars/interior/Martian_valley_networks.html

Pack Ice Spotted Near the Mars Equator



Plates of apparent fractured pack ice spotted near the Mars equator (left) compared to ice in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica.

Space.com


Water on Mars Collection

[edit on 7-9-2009 by zorgon]



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 03:57 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon
Now since we know that surface temperature DOES get above frezzing on Mars for short periods (81 F recorded) then it follows that at some point this ice lake would have liquid water
I doubt that the ice was "born" there like that, so I guess there was liquid water there, but for it to become liquid again the pressure also needs to be in the right range, right?



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 05:07 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaPbut for it to become liquid again the pressure also needs to be in the right range, right?


Well that is NASA's 'story' yes... the 'pressure'
Surely you don't believe EVERYTHING they tell you?


I wonder how they plan to get this thing running up there?





Heck I want to know how they are going to get it up there


I wrote the Humvee people but they refused to answer my questions

I asked them how they kept the engine from freezing on Mars; how the astronauts get in and out with their space suits; what fuel does it use; and how will they get it there; and who will do the repairs...

No answer so far





[edit on 7-9-2009 by zorgon]



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 08:14 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Or for that matter, how do they have the current rovers running on what? 5x their life expectancy on the planet if the "pressure" isn't right?

When I see those frozen lake pics, I think of a dried up pond.
Frozen water?
What complex life could remain?

Mmmm... something like an amphibious scorpion.
You can freeze those suckers solid and as soon as they thaw, they are up and running again.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 08:35 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 

Pressure, meaning atmospheric pressure. The rovers were designed to operate under low (or no) atmospheric pressure.

Low atmospheric pressure means that liquid water would not exist long on the surface without boiling into water vapor. Ice sublimates directly to water vapor, it doesn't melt. No lakes.

Note that this says nothing about liquid water which may be sealed under the surface.

[edit on 9/7/2009 by Phage]



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 08:58 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Man, I see what you're saying, but that photo that Zorgon posted sure looks like a lake.
2nd line



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 09:04 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 

It isn't.
Fun with colors.



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