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Homemade Groceries & Supplies

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posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 09:15 AM
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reply to post by mamabeth
 


Jellies are an easy and tasty way to preserve fruits. I guess I didn't spend enough time perusing that site; all I saw was the laundry soap recipe. Will have to revisit and see what else is on there.

How to make your own Corn Syrup:
6 ears sweet corn (=2C. raw pulp)
1t. salt
1/8t. white pepper
1t. sugar
2C. heated milk or cream
1T. butter
1t. flour
Grate the corn. Cover the cobs with cold water and boil for 30 minutes then strain. To a pint of this corn liquid, add the raw corn pulp and cook for 15 minutes. Add seasoning and hot milk. Heat the butter, add flour and gradually add corn mixture. Cook for 5 minutes more. Cool. Bottle.

Homemade Onion Soup Mix:
1/3C. bouillion (granules or a cube grated)
4T. onion powder (can dehydrate and powder your own onions)
1/4t. sugar
1/4t. crushed celery seed
Combine everything in a blender or coffee grinder until ground to a fine powder. Add 3/4C. minced onion. Store. 5T.=1 of the 1oz. packages.

[edit on 7-9-2009 by whitewave]




posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 09:44 AM
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Homemade Ketchup:
1-1/2t. whole cloves
1-1/2 cinnamon stick
1t. celery seed
1C. white vinegar
8 pounds ripe tomatoes (@25 medium)
1T. chopped onion
1/4t. red pepper
1C. sugar
4t. salt
Put vinegar and spices in saucepan; cover and heat to boiling. Remove, then prepare the tomato mixture. Place peeled, mashed tomatoes in kettle; add onion and pepper. Heat to boiling for 15 minutes, stirring constantly. Sieve tomatoes, add sugar, heat to boiling then simmer about 45-60 minutes or until only 1/2 the amount remains. Strain vinegar and spice (via cheesecloth or muslin) into tomato mix. Discard spices. Add salt. Simmer entire concoction until it's ketchup consistency. Fill into 2 pint size jars. Seal.

Ice Water Without Ice:
Surround the water vessel with one or more folds of coarse cotton kept constantly wet. The evaporation of the water will carry off the heat from the inside and reduce it to a near freezing point.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 10:22 AM
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To quickly answer the Soap Question = almost any 'fat' can be used to make soap. The type of fat will determine the hardness of the end product. Example - lard makes a hard bar and olive oil makes a soft(er) bar.

Combo's of fat also work well and will produce variations in the end result.

Important note - ALWAYS add the Lye to the water NEVER the other way around!

The lye water will get very hot. Wait until it cools a little before combining the fat.

There are basically two (2) ways to make soap - Hot Process and Cold Process. I use the Cold Process. This involves no 'cooking'.

I use a Stick Blender and blend the lye water (warm) to melted fat and mix with the blender until it is the consistancy of thick pancake batter. Then pour into your molds. You can also add color and/or fragrance.

Also the amount of lye to the amount of fat is important. Too much lye and you end up with "lye-heavy" soap that is harsh.

The best way I can describe the Laundry Soap 'gel' is snot
it is a kind of slimy, gooy mixture - but it does work well.

Thanks for the Lye info - I feel 'blonde'
as I have soap sites I use for my supplies and just never even thought to look for lye (think it is because I think of it as a semi-dangerous product for shipping??).

I do know about the process of making lye from charcoal - and read that the way you can tell if it is ready is float an egg. If it has about 1/4 to 1/3 above the water it is ready.

I will post a couple of soap recipes later - tomorrow when hubby goes back to work
Same for the mineral makeup.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 10:22 AM
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I forgot to add last night that we substitute Ivory soap for the Fels Naptha. We couldn't find the Fels anywhere (grocery stores or Wal-Mart).

Lots of good links on here. With fall around the corner, it's a good time to try these out.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:02 AM
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reply to post by whitewave
 


Whitewave, I don't think you ever answered my question on the Lard tip.


1. Can I mix different types of animal fats or should I "keep 'em separated"?
2. What type of animal fat is best to use?



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:14 AM
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reply to post by whitewave
 


I make all my jelly now,no more store bought.I had several jars of
jelly from the store.I remade the jelly and added juice to it.

2-2lb jars(any flavor) jelly
1-12oz can frozen juice to match the flavor(thawed)
1 can of water mixed into juice
1-box of sure-gel pectin(pink box only)
2-cups of sugar,set aside in bowl

Have your waterbath canner on the stove boiling.I use pint-sized jars
and have washed them in hot,soapy water.After I wash them,I leave
them in the rinse sink to keep hot.
Now,I am ready to remake store bought jelly.

Pour the jelly into a large pot,add the juice andmix this and add the pectin and stir.
Have the stove on medium-high,bring the mixture to a hard boil.
Remove from burner,stir in sugar,put back on burner and bring
to a hard boil.
I didn't time this,so,I can't give exact time.
The mixture will start to gel a little on your spoon handle.
Have a clean towel next to your stove along with a laddle and funnel.
After I put the sugar in and the pot is on the stove.I start bringing my
jars over and put them on the towel(have to be quick) 2 at a time,stir
and go back for 2 more.
When I think the jelly is ready,I remove it off the burner.I use the funnel,
on top of the jar,and laddle in the mixture.Wipe the rims off with a
clean cloth, put your lid on then the screw cap and tighten.Place the jars
in the canner and cover,when the canner is boiling,boil the jars for
10 minutes.Remove with tongs and place the jars on a towel,let them
set for 24 hours.
Check the lids ,the next day, to see if they sealed(you should hear
popping sounds after removing from canner)if popped,put into fridge.
This makes about 6pints.On a candy thermometer about 225 degrees.
I almost forgot,some jelly has a lot of foam on the top,skim this off before
putting into your jars.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by HunkaHunka
 

My response to your question was on page 2 about 3 posts after your post. Also, mappam (this page) seemed to indicate that you could mix different fats in the soap. Clarification needed?

Thanks mamabeth for the recipe. I hadn't considered using frozen fruit juice. Nice addition.

Rose Hip Jam:
Don't gather until after first frost and use same day as picked. Boil 4C. berries with 2-1/2C. water until soft. Sieve to remove seeds. Add 1C. sugar to 2C. pulp. Mix well and simmer for 10 minutes. Bottle. A layer of sugar on top helps improve the flavor.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:31 AM
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Originally posted by whitewave
reply to post by undo
 


Before this thread turns into the cooking show, I've got recipes for wild edibles on another thread. If you're interested in cooking with roses, I've got an entire cookbook of old recipes for roses. Apparently, they were widely used in the kitchens of our ancestors.



Rose water/oil


Place a heavy glass ramekin into a deep stockpot. Fill the ramekin 3/4 full with water to weigh it down. Place rose petals or herbs around the exterior of the ramekin in the bottom of the pot and cover with water halfway up the side of the ramekin. Place a shallow soup bowl on top of the ramekin. Bring the water and rose petals to a boil. Lower heat to simmer.

Place a stainless steel bowl on top of the stockpot. It should be large enough to seal the pot, but shallow enough so that its bottom is above the top level of the soup bowl. Fill the top bowl with ice.

Simmer the mixture 3 to 4 hours, depending on the amount. As the mixture boils, the heat rises and hits the cold bowl, causing it to condense and drip down into the inner bowl. Replace ice as needed as it melts.

When done, the small bowl will contain the rose water (or herb water). It will have a layer of rose oil (or herb oil) that is the essential oil or extract. The oil may be separated from the water.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:40 AM
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reply to post by prof-rabbit
 

Thanks for the recipe. The ones I've got are similar. What do you use your rose oil/water for? Do you use it in cooking or for making toiletries? I use mine for cooking but it's nice to know of other uses for the same thing.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by whitewave
 


Sorry I missed that!

Thanks!



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:43 AM
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to the OP, awesome post. I love anything that promotes natural products and shows people an easy way to make them.

Great job.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:44 AM
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Here's a recipe for a healing ointment. For little cuts and scratches and also works as a barrier against moisture.

Makes 6 1/2 tbsp
6 tbsp. white petroleum jelly
1/2 tsp paraffin wax
1/4 tsp anhydrous lanolin
10 drops essential oil (lemon, tea tree or lavendar)

Place the petroleum jelly, paraffin wax and lanolin in a double boiler and melt slowly over low heat, stirring constantly. Once melted, remove from the heat and continue stirring the mixture as it cools and thickens. Stir in the essential oil and store in a china or dark glass container.

I prefer tea tree as it is an antiseptic.

This recipe comes from a book I have called "The Country Store" by Stephanie Donaldson. It has resources for suppliers of essential oils, medicinal and culinary herbs, dried flowers, candle making materials etc.

Lots of recipes from anything to working in the kitchen to toiletries.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:47 AM
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4 oz. Coconut Oil
4 oz. Olive Oil
8 oz. Lard
6 oz. Water
2.25 oz Lye (sodium hydroxide)

Easy soap recipe using a mixture of oils/fat



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:54 AM
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reply to post by calihan_12
 

I agree!
As a firm believer in self sufficiency, I am glad for this thread!
Maybe more people will realize it IS do-able, and maybe they
will give up their mcmansions and a lifestyle of excess and
stop funding this system of greed! Now THAT is true freedom!
We're paying for the screwing we're getting!

S & F!



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:59 AM
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reply to post by soldiermom
 

Yeah! More books. Last time I was in Barnes & Noble the guy ringing up my purchases called me by my first name and asked where the rest of the family was. LOL. I told him that as often as I'm in there and as much money as I spend there, I should have my own commemorative plaque. He said "we're working on it."


How does that lotion feel? Can you open doors after applying it to your hands or is it greasy? One of the earlier posters mentioned making their own toiletries but didn't post any of them up. If you have a whole book of such....please share. Thanks in advance.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 12:01 PM
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reply to post by mappam
 

Excellent! That is much easier than mine. I like to keep things as simple as possible so this is a great help. Must try soon.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by whitewave
reply to post by prof-rabbit
 

Thanks for the recipe. The ones I've got are similar. What do you use your rose oil/water for? Do you use it in cooking or for making toiletries? I use mine for cooking but it's nice to know of other uses for the same thing.


Add 1 part rose oil to 4 parts apricot kernel oil for a great massage oil, (apricot kernel oil is cheap) really good for ageing skin.

Rose water is used in cooking particularly Mediterranean dishes, also great for boiled sweets and toffees.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 12:09 PM
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Paste/Glue:
Unboiled Paste:
A handful of flour. Add water a little at a time until gooey (it should be thick) and a pinch of salt. Store in airtight container.

Boiled Paste:
1/2C. flour
Add cold water until it is as thick as cream. Simmer and stire for 5 minutes. Store in airtight container in the cold when not in use. Boiled paste lasts longer than unboiled. (Neither are for eating)

Paint:
Mix flour and salt with a little water and add plant dyes. (See thread entitled "Plant Dyes" for list of colors).

Playdough:
1C. salt
1-1/2C. flour
1/2C. water
2T. oil
few drops of food coloring (or plant dyes) for color if desired.
Mix all together. Lasts for weeks if kept in cool place in airtight container.

Homemade Modeling Clay:
1C. flour
1C. salt
Enough water to make a stiff dough. Can be painted. Very brittle when dry.

[edit on 7-9-2009 to link to plant dyes but no joy with that.]

[edit on 7-9-2009 by whitewave]



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 12:30 PM
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Originally posted by whitewave
reply to post by soldiermom
 

Yeah! More books. Last time I was in Barnes & Noble the guy ringing up my purchases called me by my first name and asked where the rest of the family was. LOL. I told him that as often as I'm in there and as much money as I spend there, I should have my own commemorative plaque. He said "we're working on it."


How does that lotion feel? Can you open doors after applying it to your hands or is it greasy? One of the earlier posters mentioned making their own toiletries but didn't post any of them up. If you have a whole book of such....please share. Thanks in advance.


Same here about Barnes & Noble. If I had the money, I'd be in there every day.

I'll have to work on compiling a list of the books I have along these lines and post them up later.

The cream is not too greasy after it absorbs. Feels like a coating of vaseline with a little tingly feeling from the tea tree oil.

Here's a recipe for rosemary hair rinse:
Makes 5 cups
2 oz. rosemary sprigs
1/4 cups cider vinegar
10 drops rosemary oil

Pour 3 3/4 cups boiling water over the rosemary sprigs, cover and leave to infuse overnight. Strain the liquid, add the vinegar and the essential oil, then pour into a bottle with a stopper.


Under the natural remedies and medicines:
Honey and lemon for sore throats
mix the juice of a large lemon with 1 tbsp clear honey (or more, according to taste) and dilute with boiling water to make a wonderfully soothing hot drink.

Witch hazel dabbed on to bites and stings will relieve the pain.

Garlic taken regularly in food, purifies the blood and lowers cholesterol. Antiseptic qualities.

Cleansing vinegars:
Malt vinegar is an extremely versatile and effective household cleaner, especially in areas where lime deposits from hard water are a problem. At it's simplest, vinegar can be used undiluted to give a brilliant clarity to windows and mirrors. Wipe over the window or mirror with a cloth or sponge dipped in vinegar and then polish dry with a crumpled-up piece of newspaper - this is an old but reliable way of achieving sparkling windows. Keep a spray bottle of vinegar in the bathroom and use it to keep shower doors free of watermarks and to prevent the build up of lime on tiles, baths and sinks.

All of the recipes above came from the book I mentioned in my previous post.

I love threads like these!

[edit on 9/7/2009 by soldiermom]



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 12:49 PM
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Nice contribution on the toiletries. We may some day have to be in survival mode but I hope we don't lose the memory of what it was like to be civilized, coiffed, clean and smelling good.


Ant Traps:
Wet a large sponge and squeeze dry (opens the cells wide). Sprinkle sponge with white sugar. When ants collect on it, dip sponge in scaling water. Repeat as necessary.

Firestarters:
2 parts dryer link with 1 part Vaseline. Mix well. Take 10 parts mixture to 1 part melted wax and mix well. Stuff lightly into toilet paper rolls leaving 1/4 inch at top. Plug the top and bottom with plain lint and a little melted wax. You can paint the toilet paper rolls to make them waterproof. Remove plug to use for a quick firestarter.



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