It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

looking for vegetables that grow yearly

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 6 2009 @ 12:48 AM
link   
I have a piece of land in northern Idaho that I plan on retiring and building a home on eventually.

as of now Ive prepped the land for survival mode. Ive planted several cherry trees over the past few years. I chose cherry over other fruits because cherry is high in protein.

I also have several huckleberry bushes growing wild on the property. They come back every year as do the cherry trees.

It only rains maybe 8 inches a yr plus another 20 inches of snow.

There is a yr-round creek that runs through the property.

Lots of deer and bear in the surrounding area. bear especially love huckleberries and are always feeding on them. Bear doesnt taste all that great but it is a supply of meat and hide if i need it.

The one thing I lack is vegetables. Considering I cant visit the property daily to water anything or replant, I need a vegetable plant that grows back every yr, doesnt mind the cold, doesnt need very much rain, and can handle higher elevations (4000 ft)

I know next to nothing about growing vegetables. I buy a small tomato plant every yr at the farmer's market and it does well. but gathering seeds, planting, etc no clue.

so is there a vegetable thats hardy that i can plant that comes back every yr ?




posted on Sep, 6 2009 @ 01:03 AM
link   
Vines

* Grape, River or Frost, Vitis riparia
* Grape, Table or Wine, Vitis sp.
* Kiwi, Actinidia sp.

Shrubs and Berries

* American elderberry, Sambucus canadensis
* American highbush crannberry, Viburnum trilobatum
* Black berry, Rubus allegheniensis
* Black raspberries, Rubus occidentalis
* Blueberry, Vaccinium angustifolium, V. corybosium
* Cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon
* Elderberry, Sambucus nigra
* Golden currants, Ribes aureum
* Golden raspberries, Rubus sp.
* Gooseberries, Ribes spp.
* Hobblebush, Viburnum alnifolium
* Honeyberry, Lonicera caerule
* Huckberry, Vaccinium sp.
* Huckle berry, Gaylussacia baccata
* Lingonberry, Vaccinium vitis-idaea
* Nannyberry, Viburnum lentago
* Red raspberries, Rubus idaeus
* Regent Serviceberry Amelanchier alnifolia 'Regent'
* Sea berry, Hippophae rhamnoides
* Silverbuffalo berry, Sheperdia argentea
* Smooth sumac, Rhus glabra
* Staghorn sumac, Rhus typhina
* Strawberry, alpine, Fragaria vesca
* Strawberry, Fragaria virginiana
* Thimbleberry, Rubus parviflorus
* Wild rose, Rosa blanda or sp.

Perennial Herbs

* Anise hyssop, Agastache foeniculum
* Basil, Ocimum basilicum
* Catnip, Nepeta cataria
* Chives, Allium schoenoprasum
* Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare
* Feverfew, Chrysanthemum parthenium
* French tarragon, Artemisia dranunculus
* Garlic chives, Allium tuberosum
* Lavender, Lavandula angustifolia
* Lovage, Levisticum officinale
* Mint, Mentha sp.
* Oregano, Origanum vulgare
* Parsley, Petroselinum crispum
* Rosemary, Rosemarinus officinalis
* Sage, Salvia
* Shiso, Japanese Red Mint, Perilla frutescens
* Thyme, Thymus vulgaris

Perennial Vegetables and Greens

* Arrowhead, Sagittaria sagittifolia
* Arugula, rocket, Diplotaxis erucoides
* Asparagus, Asparagus officinalis
* Chicory, Cichorium sp.
* Comfrey, Symphytum sp.
* Earth Pea, Lathyrus tuberosa
* Elephant Garlic, Allium ampeloprasum
* Galangal, Thai ginger, Alpinia galangal
* Garlic, Allium sativum
* Ginger, Zingiber officinale
* Globe artichoke, Cynara scolymus
* Golden shallots, Allium cepa var. aggregatum
* Ground nut, Agrios americana
* Horseradish, Amoracia sp.
* Jerusalem artichokes, sunchoke, Helianthus tuberosus
* New Zealand Spinach, Tetragonia
* Oca, New Zealand yam, Oxalis tuberosa
* Peruvian parsnip, Arracacia xanthorrhiza
* Rhubarb, Rhuem rhabarbarum
* Sea beet, Beta vulgaris ssp.maritima
* Sea kale, Crambe maritima
* Sorrel, Rumex acetosa
* Sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas
* Taro, Colocasia esculenta
* Turmeric, Indian saffron, Curcuma domestica
* Waterchestnuts, Eleocharis dulcis
* Welsh onion, Allium sp.
* Yacon, Smallanthus sonchifolius
* Yam, Dioscorea batata

I hope this helps, I don't know how well any of them would do in your zone.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 06:11 PM
link   
i have a summer home in donnelly, ID, between cascade and McCall....about an hour drive north of Boise...for your intents and purposes, i would suggest finding indigenous plants to grow...i know raspberries do well at our property, but idk what the elevation/conditions are where you're at...rhubarb grows also, as does various other flowering plants...but with the variation in seasons year to year, some years being wet and cool vs coming earlier, melting snow too soon, and it is a longer, hotter summer, etc....

maybe ask some of the local farmers in the area?



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 08:32 PM
link   

Originally posted by patrickhatch
i have a summer home in donnelly, ID, between cascade and McCall....about an hour drive north of Boise...for your intents and purposes, i would suggest finding indigenous plants to grow...i know raspberries do well at our property, but idk what the elevation/conditions are where you're at...rhubarb grows also, as does various other flowering plants...but with the variation in seasons year to year, some years being wet and cool vs coming earlier, melting snow too soon, and it is a longer, hotter summer, etc....

maybe ask some of the local farmers in the area?


the local farmers suggested rhubarb. Honestly though im intimidated by vegetables im not familiar with.

tomatoes for example, easy to pick and recognize when theyre ready to eat. rhubarb and other exotic vegetables im lost. they dont have an obvious thing hanging from a branch to pick. some look like roots, others you have to dig for, etc.

I wouldnt know what part of the plant was the rhubarb exactly.

I also looked at the asparagus. that one from what i read, it sounds like the edible part springs from the ground near the bush like a root only above ground (I think, not sure).

Near McCall eh ? I camp up at warm lake every yr. huckleberries grow like crazy up there. i transplanted a few from there to my property near sandpoint.

i worry though if things go bad. there really is only highway 55 to drive if i want to bug out from Nampa.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 09:19 PM
link   
[edit on 7-9-2009 by Takka]



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 10:53 PM
link   
There are some cold hardey nut trees like the white walnut and almosd tree. Those are nice to have around.

[edit on 7-9-2009 by Darkice19]



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:15 PM
link   
Any vegetation can grow yearly with the right conditions. If you can manage to fulfill the water, light, O2 and CO2, fertilizer, and mediums, as well as, ventilation you can grow anything at anytime of year. In any area of the world.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:27 PM
link   
reply to post by admriker444
 


Heres a map of the hardness zones of the US.
This will help you to find out what you can grow.
Hardness zones for Idaho

You should also get a soil PH tester so you can find out where things will grow best.
PH test strips with instructions

Then all you need is to find out what type of soil the plants like best.

[edit on 7-9-2009 by The Utopian Penguin]



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 05:48 AM
link   
Not sure if the "zero mile diet" seed packages have been mentioned on this site before but it is a balanced set of heirloom seed (seeds can be used year after year) that grows well.

Zero Mile Diet Seed Kit

If you're going to grow vegetables, grow things your family loves and will eat. We grow corn, squash, tomatoes, peppers (hot and reg), onions, cucumbers, green beans, watermelon and cantelope. Nothing goes to waste because everyone like these things (tend to give alot away too).

Tried beets, turnips and parsnips too which grew well but went to waste since it's not something we particularly love.



new topics

top topics



 
4

log in

join