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Mystical and Benign Religions

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posted on Sep, 5 2009 @ 12:20 PM
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Good stuff Cadbury.

I figured theres a difference between serious practioners and those who were just born etc.

Reading about them I like their philosophy. Dont like the fact that they are not allowed to cut their hair.




posted on Sep, 5 2009 @ 12:28 PM
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Here's something I've just re-dug.



The Battle of Saragarhi was fought during the Tirah Campaign on 12 September 1897 between twenty-one Sikhs of the 4th Battalion (then 36th Sikhs) of the Sikh Regiment of British India, defending an army post, and 10,000 Afghan and Orakzai tribesmen in a last stand. The battle occurred in the North-West Frontier Province, now a part of Pakistan, which then formed part of British India.

The contingent of the twenty-one Sikhs from the 36th Sikhs was led by Havildar Ishar Singh. They all chose to fight to the death. Sikh military personnel and Sikh civilians commemorate the battle every year on 12 September, as Saragarhi Day.


(Emphasis added)



posted on Sep, 5 2009 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by Cadbury
 


They have this thing where they`d rather die than be enslaved or something. Its common in a few eastern traditions.



posted on Sep, 5 2009 @ 03:53 PM
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Sufism Under Attack In Iran


Some conservative clerics have called the Sufis a danger to Islam. Ayatollah Hossein Nuri Hamedani, a high-ranking cleric in Qom, said in 2006 that by not interfering in politics, Sufis weaken Islam.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 08:53 AM
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Nice thread Skyfloating, although there is no religion higher than the truth.

I have always enjoyed hearing and reading about the The Bahá'í Faith. Inside their buildings, place of worship etc, (don't know the correct term), they have a book of every major religion hung up, all at the exact same height and distance to show no bias, each one is deemed equal. Everyone is welcome, which is such a refreshing mindset compared to other religions.

While i am not a member of the Bahá'í Faith, i admire and follow their morals of, equality, tolerance, unity, peace and their sense of embracing diversity. Some view points which we would all benefit from if people followed, which makes it a very benign religion imo


Peace



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 10:36 AM
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reply to post by ziggystar60
 


I agree, ziggystar60, Wicca should have been mentioned, but as usual Wicca is not seen as a religion, and I don't really see it as that myself either, do you? Wicca is more of a core value of knowledge, and connecting to Nature and the Feminine Power in all of us. Even men. We do not try to "convert," if you are not, or you are tied down by Dogma, we don't want you anyway. Thanks for saying that. Love and Light.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 11:36 AM
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Originally posted by Skyfloating
reply to post by metamagic
 


Nice additions. Are you familiar with any of them?


Yes, very. And they have all a profound influence in shaping my current beliefs.

I am very familiar with the beliefs, doctrines, practices and conventions of the mainstream religions (since I have participated in most due to family obligations in a very culturally diverse extended family). I was very disappointed in those experiences.



[edit on 7-9-2009 by metamagic]



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by metamagic
 


The main problem of mainstream Religions is the "I am exslusively right, you are totally wrong" stance. Once this childish position is done away with, there is a chance for renewal rather than continued decay.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 12:06 PM
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Originally posted by autowrench
I agree, ziggystar60, Wicca should have been mentioned, but as usual Wicca is not seen as a religion, and I don't really see it as that myself either, do you? Wicca is more of a core value of knowledge, and connecting to Nature and the Feminine Power in all of us. Even men. We do not try to "convert," if you are not, or you are tied down by Dogma, we don't want you anyway. Thanks for saying that. Love and Light.



I did not include Wicca in the OP because its already quite known around here and there are all ready too many pro-and-anti stances connected to it (similar to atheism vs. christianity etc.).

But I think its a valid addition to the thread nevertheless.



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 05:20 PM
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1. I tried Sufi spinning a few times and I nearly threw up but then I lay down and had a bunch of insights. In fact, I think spinning is one of the most powerful meditations out there. Very good at stopping the internal dialogue, which is the key element to all meditations.

2.

So...what do you know about Sikh people? Because I know nothing of them or of any of the other religions mentioned.


The minorities get a lot of stick in England. In my personal experience, Sikhs are a lot more peaceful and centred than other minority faiths. I think it comes from the fact that they are literally and physically reminded of their commitment to 'God' every day. From what I've ssen they practice what they preach.

3. Gnosticism is a good one. Not all of Jesus' techings made it into the Bible. A researcher called Steve Gamble has done a great job of piecing the Nag Hammadi together in his 'Shopping for Spirit' articles.

'Thunder, Perfect Mind' is a seminal gnostic poem, I think it deals with the collapse of opposites in one:

Thunder, Perfect Mind




[edit on 19f20094amThu, 10 Sep 2009 04:56:53 -050053 by HiAliens]



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 09:44 PM
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reply to post by Skyfloating
 


Religions are like ladders to a great roof. Each of us chooses our ladder, but once we're at the top we have no need for them anymore. And of course, to stretch the analogy just a little further, not everyone needs a religion, some do scale the wall free hand.

Many paths, one destination.



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 10:28 AM
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I am a baptised sikh, and have found this discussion extremely interesting, what has been said about sikhism is mostly correct, though I must say that ALL baptised sikhs carry the five k's of which includes a ceremonial dagger called the kirpan. Some of the women also wear a turban but it is not necessary, but the head must be kept covered.

In regards to keeping of hair a Sikh does not cut the hair of his or her children. Hair carries radiant energy which helps one to meditate and be mentally centered. Sikhs wear the hair tied in a bun at the tenth gate (at the top of the head).



posted on Oct, 12 2009 @ 08:46 AM
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Originally posted by HiAliens
1. I tried Sufi spinning a few times and I nearly threw up but then I lay down and had a bunch of insights. In fact, I think spinning is one of the most powerful meditations out there. Very good at stopping the internal dialogue, which is the key element to all meditations.


Ive tried it too. I think its a real-deal Meditation.



posted on Oct, 12 2009 @ 08:48 AM
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reply to post by Jumbo
 


Are there no exceptions to hair-cutting and sword-wearing?



posted on Oct, 12 2009 @ 10:10 AM
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Pagans like other organized religions admit there is a greater force or diety which mankind owes reverence to...


ziggystar60...
"When one defines oneself as Pagan, it means she or he follows an earth or nature religion, one that sees the divine manifest in all creation. The cycles of nature are our holy days, the earth is our temple, its plants and creatures our partners and teachers. We worship a deity that is both male and female, a mother Goddess and father God, who together created all that is, was, or will be. We respect life, cherish the free will of sentient beings, and accept the sacredness of all creation."
Edain McCoy





whereas the Shamanic system is not a 'belief' or 'faith' system as religion is.
A Shamanic way of life would equate with VooDoo on a spectrum of spiritual living/ ideology / practice of 'arts' rather than a religion or belief-system...



...metamagic
-3. Shamanism: (Wiki blah blah) comprises a range of traditional beliefs and practices concerned with communication with the spirit world. A practitioner of shamanism is known as a shaman, pronounced /ˈʃɑːmən/, /ˈʃeɪmən/, (|ˈshämən; ˈshā-|) noun (pl. -man(s)). There are many variations of shamanism throughout the world, but several common beliefs are shared by all forms of shamanism.
Shamans are intermediaries between the human and spirit worlds. According to believers, they can treat illness and are capable of entering supernatural realms to obtain answers to the problems of their community.


being Pagan & Shamanistic, i see that the major organized religions over the ages, added a whole lot of embellishments to Pagan & Shamanic traditions, rites, spiritual journeys to the upper and the lowers worlds...
~ i would suggest that primal mankind was 'closer' & 'awakened' to the spiritual self with these 2 precursers to 'religion' than the many saved or self righteous souls of modern men during the last 4,000 years



but that's just this persons view...



posted on Oct, 14 2009 @ 09:15 AM
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reply to post by St Udio
 


COME ON NOW....i think i doused the dialogue


well...i will try to make up for that & possibly restart the thread interest,
i found this page which might be interesting, if not just whacky,
about smaller-tiny-mystical?-benign?
Today's followings which may blossom into full fledged religions sometime in our 2012 future ??


www.weirdworm.com...

title: "Top 5 Most Bizarre And Absurd Registered Religions"



[edit on 14-10-2009 by St Udio]



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