It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Man saw the Space Shuttle launch.. in North London

page: 1
5
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 4 2009 @ 08:45 AM
link   

Everything was looking good as America's latest space shuttle blasted off from Florida.

And the view was also pretty spectacular from Don Lyven's veg patch - almost 4,500 miles away in Finchley, North London.

The painter and decorator saw it zoom through the morning sky - and managed to grab this amazing picture.

Just 20 minutes earlier, amateur astronomer Don, 53, had watched on TV as Discovery OV-103 lifted off at Kennedy Space Centre just before 5am on Saturday.


Source

I am ever so jealous of this man!

I am not wondering if there is any chance of me (further uo north) seeing shuttle launches in the future?

My knowledge of these things is limited to say the least, still fascinates me though.

Is this a rare occurence or does it happen a lot?

Thanks.




posted on Sep, 4 2009 @ 09:21 AM
link   
From reading the article, it said,


"Because of its angle of orbit I knew it would cross the UK so I drove to my allotment, where I knew I could see the horizon and there are fewer street lights to spoil the view."


So perhaps next launch check out which way its blasting off, and garner a view if it is heading your way
Also the weather looks mighty clear in that photograph and I think even a few clouds would have distorted the view at that distance.



posted on Sep, 4 2009 @ 09:48 AM
link   

Originally posted by LiveForever8

I am not wondering if there is any chance of me (further uo north) seeing shuttle launches in the future?

My knowledge of these things is limited to say the least, still fascinates me though.

Is this a rare occurence or does it happen a lot?

Thanks.


I am sure ngchunter can answer that question. I would like to know myself! (I live in Norway.)

I have sent him a U2U and alerted him about your thread.



posted on Sep, 4 2009 @ 10:19 AM
link   
Wow I never knew you could see it that far. I live 20 mins from the Space Center and can see the launch pad and NASA buildings from my balcony. What is weird is how small it looks here even though I am close to it and how the size in the area this guy saw it wasnt much bigger or smaller .Very cool : )



posted on Sep, 4 2009 @ 10:20 AM
link   
Wow, it just looks like another plane with a trail.

How did he know?

And I didn't even know you could actually see those things at that distance.

What an awesome pic.

Gonna keep my eyes open from now on.



posted on Sep, 4 2009 @ 11:37 AM
link   
Is that the only pic?

It can only just make out a faint second trail as described in the article - but can't see anything of the orange fuel tank. Is a higher res image posted elsewhere perhaps?



posted on Sep, 4 2009 @ 11:53 AM
link   
reply to post by morgansolutions
 






There ya go, a bit better.

The one in the newspaper was understandably better



posted on Sep, 4 2009 @ 12:11 PM
link   

Just 20 minutes earlier, amateur astronomer Don, 53, had watched on TV as Discovery OV-103 lifted off at Kennedy Space Centre just before 5am on Saturday.

Impossible.

The shuttle takes just 8.5 minutes to reach orbit and shut down it's engines. There are no contrails in space. 20 minutes after launch the shuttle was probably about 100 miles over Russia.

That is a photograph of a contrail from a jet.

Edit:....OK...unlikely.

[edit on 9/4/2009 by Phage]



posted on Sep, 4 2009 @ 12:35 PM
link   
reply to post by LiveForever8
 


Thanks live forever, much better pic.

Still find it hard to believe that's the contrail from the shuttle. If that's viewed from over 4,000 miles away, it must cover a phenomenal distance - I don't think a burn of 8.5 minutes would cover it.

If the distance to space is about 100km (the Kerman line) then, taking the curvature of the earth into account, the furthest this could be seen from sea level on earth is about 770 miles. That's not even a 5th the distance claimed!

If you go with another claim that space starts at about 350km, then it's about 1440 miles - still not even close.

There is still atmosphere at 10,000km, but this is so thin there is no way contrails would form.

Now, if the shuttle first decided to head towards Europe, and perhaps angled itself at a ridiculous gradient (i.e almost flat!), then maybe it's plausible!

For anyone who want's to run these maths over, I used pythagoras theorem of right-angled triangles - SQRT (h+2rh)

Where h is the height above sea level and r is the radius of the earth -about, 4,000 miles.




[edit on 4-9-2009 by morgansolutions]

[edit on 4-9-2009 by morgansolutions]



posted on Sep, 4 2009 @ 12:46 PM
link   
I highly doubt its the space shuttle it is impossible for it to be imo. Space isnt that far away in fact space is no more than 100km up. someone want to do the trigonmetry taking into account the curvature of the earth and as the earth moves in an anti clockwise postion as viewd from the north pole.......



posted on Sep, 4 2009 @ 12:54 PM
link   
The pic looks odd, the pixels of the contrail come to an abrupt stop, then nothing.

Not debunking, just looks odd.



posted on Sep, 5 2009 @ 09:26 PM
link   

Originally posted by butch_uk
The pic looks odd, the pixels of the contrail come to an abrupt stop, then nothing.

Not debunking, just looks odd.

Most likely this is a long exposure photograph; the trail comes to a stop when the exposure stopped. The sky looks brighter than it really was, probably just at or just before sunrise.

To answer ziggystar's question, here's a map of the shuttle launch visibility:
stevespeeves.files.wordpress.com...
This was a rare opportunity where after main engine cutoff, the shuttle and its tank entered sunlight before full daylight was visible to this guy on the ground in Britain. It's always possible to spot the shuttle on the first orbit at some point on the ground, it just may not always be easy to get to that spot. One way to tell where you can see the shuttle just after launch is to look at the orbit path of the space station when it passes right over Cape Canaveral; the shuttle will launch when the northern track of ISS's orbital plane goes right over the cape, so it will follow that path for the first orbit and anyone positioned near that line can see it if the time is right around early morning or evening when it goes overhead (so that the shuttle is in direct sunlight but you on the ground are not). I don't have a way of projecting a 2D map of the track, but here's a 3D projection so you can see where the shuttle would go after main engine cutoff. Anyone within the red circle could see it as it passes over:
i319.photobucket.com...



posted on Sep, 5 2009 @ 09:58 PM
link   
reply to post by ngchunter
 

Time exposure. 5:00 AM. Oops. Well, at least I did add the "unlikely" to soften the "impossible".

I'm surprised that the color of the external tank was discernible from 100+ miles below but it was in full sunlight up there.



posted on Sep, 5 2009 @ 10:16 PM
link   
Maybe it is shuttles fuel tank which was burning up as it re entered the atmosphere. Because, at MECO, generally the shuttle would be near canada, and when it is over england, it could be the empty fuel tank re entering the atmopshere.



posted on Sep, 5 2009 @ 10:16 PM
link   
Double post. Sorry for the disturbance.


[edit on September 5th, 2009 by peacejet]



posted on Sep, 5 2009 @ 10:34 PM
link   
reply to post by peacejet
 

The tank ends up in the Indian Ocean so I think it re-enters after it passes over Europe.



posted on Sep, 5 2009 @ 10:51 PM
link   
I think you guys forget this is a rocket not a jet engine. There is smoke left in its path and a large orange glow from the flames.






link to more photos



posted on Sep, 5 2009 @ 10:53 PM
link   
reply to post by JBA2848
 

The engines were shut down 12 minutes and 3000 miles before it got to England.



posted on Sep, 5 2009 @ 10:56 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


I don't think you can see it from england. You might see the shuttle as a white light the way it looked here in Florida after shut down of the engines.



posted on Sep, 6 2009 @ 04:27 PM
link   
reply to post by JBA2848
 


It would basically look the same way it does during any other "satellite pass" of the shuttle provided the conditions are right, which they were. The only differences would be the fact that the shuttle's external tank is still nearby and hasn't burned up yet, and the shuttle hasn't yet reached apoapsis, so it's still a little bit lower than it would normally be when its orbit is circularized.



new topics

top topics



 
5
<<   2 >>

log in

join