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Police Creating Crime in Tigard, Oregon

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posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 07:13 PM
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(Note to mods-I know that we are very touchy about drug related topics around here these days, however, I implore you to look at the entire situation before deciding to delete this thread. I feel it is a VERY blatant example of our law enforcement abusing power.)


In the spring, summer and fall of 2008, the Tigard police department, in Tigard, Oregon, in conjunction with the Washington County Sheriff participated in an 8 month string of complex yet oh so simple stings using craigslist and other networking sites as their tool.

Adds were posted on craigslist, as young women, asking for marijuana in exchange for sex. Most of things postings stated something along the lines of "my boyfriend is out of town, I'm broke and need something to smoke, in exchange I'm willing to give up this ass."

When responded to, the poster of the ad would then attempt to turn the exchange as explicit as possible, luring the responder into his own grave.

Facebook and myspace accounts, pictures, personas.

There are 3 officers that posted the majority of the ads:
Oddis Rollins
Thomas Hahn Jr.
Thomas Clarson
and it is known that superior officers
Lt. Rob Harburg
Sgt Neil Charlton
Sgt Tom Duncan

were aware of some, if not all, of the practices being used by the officers.

At this point the activities have been stopped, as the Washington County D.A. office started refusing to prosecute. However, 24 men were convicted in all, all of felony charges, most carrying less than an arrestable amount of pot.

The tigard police department still denies any wrong doing.

The situations raises many questions:
Isn't this entrapment? No, Oregon has all but eliminated entrapment laws.

Isn't this identity impersination by the officers? Absolutely. They have admitted that they randomly copied a picture online. They created personas for these pictures. They pretended to be someone else.

Is it legal for a cop to create crime so that he can arrest someone? It remains to be seen. One add that Rollins posted was titled "420 chick for a d*ick". What's to say these people didn't go commit the crime of buying pot only because they were prompted to by a police officer?

Aren't Oregon lawmakers doing anything about it? No. Although many prominent politicians, most notably Kevin Mannix, have spoken out about it, no action has yet been taken.

My research shows me that Officer Oddis Rollins had a less than exemplary record as a cop, and is now believed to be working security for Trimet Transportation. As far as is know, all others involved are still active on duty.

A great article about this situation can be found here:
wweek.com...

I urge each of you, if you do not agree with this type of backwards justice, to write the Tigar Mayor Craig E. Dirksen here:
craigd@tigard-or.gov
and DEMAND action be taken. This is an absolute infringement of the rights of citizens. We cannot let this stand!




posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 07:32 PM
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Ever watch "To Catch A Predator"? Sounds like the same thing. Basically just a sting.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 07:40 PM
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Originally posted by Mekanic
Ever watch "To Catch A Predator"? Sounds like the same thing. Basically just a sting.


That's fantastic. The article I referenced in my OP is called "To Catch a Stoner". One person interviewed in the article compares these officers directly to child predators.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 07:43 PM
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reply to post by cautiouslypessimistic
 


It's not illegal. It's called a sting operation. Police do it alot. Like they have a police officer that will pose as a prostitute and have them come over and try to buy services.

Or they go to a drug dealer and buy pot from them, then use it as evidence to convict them.

It's lawful because they get the evidence that the accused intended to buy services from a prostitute, or that the drug dealer intended to sell marijuana or any other drug.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 07:47 PM
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Originally posted by Miraj
reply to post by cautiouslypessimistic
 


It's not illegal. It's called a sting operation. Police do it alot. Like they have a police officer that will pose as a prostitute and have them come over and try to buy services.

Or they go to a drug dealer and buy pot from them, then use it as evidence to convict them.

It's lawful because they get the evidence that the accused intended to buy services from a prostitute, or that the drug dealer intended to sell marijuana or any other drug.


Here's the couple of kickers, though.

#1, they violated Craigslist terms of service by knowingly posting false information and posing as another person.

#2, they requested the crime be commited. They didnt stand on a street corner and wait for a john, they openly asked people to get marijuana for them, and then trade it for sex.

#3, They used pictures of real girls, and set up profiles of fake people, on myspace and facebook to back their stories. This, my friend, is identity theft.


The DA even decided these were not lawful arrests.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 07:57 PM
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Originally posted by cautiouslypessimistic
The DA even decided these were not lawful arrests.


Well then, that's the part that confuses me.

If the DA thought they were not lawful arrests then why did the DA Office prosecute these cases?

The part many people don't realize is that the Police can arrest you anytime they want, however they want, wherever they want. It is not a crime to arrest you.

It is a crime however to be held without an arraignment (charge) for longer than 24 hours (72 hours if you were unfortunate enough to get arrested late Friday morning).

Although the police are charged with upholding the law, most LEO do not have legal backgrounds. That is what the District Attorney's Office is for!

It is common for the Police to make an arrest and the DA to decide not to press charges. It is even more common for them to press charges but then drop them before they go to trial.

Being arrested and then not charged, or having the charges dropped is the best kind of exoneration out there. If it goes to trial and you are found "NOT GUILTY" that doesn't mean you are innocent. Having the DA not press charges before it goes to trial does mean you are innocent.

In a perfect world the Police wouldn't make unlawful arrests, however since this isn't a perfect world, our Justice System is designed to handle unlawful arrests either by the DA whose office has the responsibility of trying criminal cases against those who are charged, and by the Judge who must hear the case if the DA pursues it that far.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 07:57 PM
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I have read your thread, I have also read the article linked in the thread and here is my comments. Although I do not agree with entrapment wheather on the books or not I feel that the cops were able to seal convictions on people who should have been taken off the streats and this is why:

I personally do not use Craiglist but let's say I did or any other type which some I do use, if I answer to adds or requests or IM's regarding sex, drugs or anything illegal then it's my lack of self control and I deserve what I get. I don't personally reply to emails I don't know who from, I don't click on links from websites I don't know or trust and I don't go looking for sex, drugs or anything from people, places or things I don't know personally. I just don't do it.

Again, I do not like entrapment of any kind like a cop sitting behind a sign thinking I'm speeding, pulls me over because he knows we will pay the ticket most of the time period. But people who answer ads for sex, drugs or anything illegal are ripe for the picking. Sorry.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by cautiouslypessimistic
 


#2 is all that counts.

But that is true. They should have known better. The men arrested should also be let go.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 08:09 PM
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when a person breaks a law to catch a criminal, what have they become themselves?

there are only so many times the lines can be blurred before there are no lines left and only a giant smudge remains.

but i suppose in many ways we are already at that sad state. what can truly be considered justice? what, if anything, is truly right and wrong? we've been struggling with that for a very, very long time and unfortunately, i don't see the answer popping up any time soon.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 08:09 PM
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reply to post by fraterormus
 


The DA got 24 guilty pleas, then started throwing the cases out. The sad part is that that many lawyers rolled over on their clients in such a shaky case.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 08:10 PM
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Originally posted by Miraj
reply to post by cautiouslypessimistic
 


#2 is all that counts.

But that is true. They should have known better. The men arrested should also be let go.


Not true whatsoever. Just because you're a police officer does not give you free pass for identity theft, which, btw, is now a crime that falls under the umbrella of homeland security.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 08:15 PM
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Wow, this is absolutely ridiculous. Now, I'm no drug dealer, but I gurantee that if some hot chick like that practically begging me for marijuana in exchange to let me have sex.. I would be able to find some w/ no problem at all, its not that hard.. And 3.5 grams? Ha! I can't help but laugh at police as of late. It's like a bunch of george bush's runnin around w/ a badge. Who comes up w/ this shi+?



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 08:16 PM
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And btw, I know you can't use the entrapment excuse anymore but how about fraud? Can cops be tried for that? Seems like a clear cut case of it to me..



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 08:38 PM
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reply to post by Miraj
 


I am so glad you agree with waisting our tax money on bogus charges.... i hope those cops die a very slow and painful death..



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 08:46 PM
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my personal opionion is if the cops have this much time on there hands they should be like the rest of the country and be laid the hell OFF. like another poster said. where is the line between right and wrong. where is the line between good and evil persay. humans have needs and wants, and if the cops are now using psyche to entrap tax paying adults into jail, well my friends you better stay at home. christ


[edit on 1-9-2009 by tatersalad]



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 09:13 PM
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reply to post by cautiouslypessimistic
 


#3, They used pictures of real girls, and set up profiles of fake people, on myspace and facebook to back their stories. This, my friend, is identity theft.

That's not identity theft. That's misuse of someone's picture.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 09:15 PM
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Originally posted by Miraj
reply to post by cautiouslypessimistic
 


#3, They used pictures of real girls, and set up profiles of fake people, on myspace and facebook to back their stories. This, my friend, is identity theft.

That's not identity theft. That's misuse of someone's picture.

Using someone's picture falsely and without permission is absolutely identity theft. Furthermore, creating a false identity with intent to defraud someone is also identity theft. Finally, using someones picture without their consent and claiming it is you absolutely falls under identity theft laws.



posted on Sep, 2 2009 @ 12:11 AM
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Anyone else have any thoughts on this? Or are we okay with abuse of power nowadays?



posted on Sep, 2 2009 @ 12:12 PM
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As of today, no new action has been taken.



posted on Sep, 2 2009 @ 06:06 PM
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reply to post by cautiouslypessimistic
 


So you're saying that when and undercover cop creates an identity to get inside a drug ring (intent to defraud), that is illegal? Yea right. If he uses the name Bill Smith, and there's another Bill Smith in the world, that identity has been stolen?

Also, violating the TOA of Craigslist, is not breaking the law, it's violating the usage agreement, and Craigslist can then ban you, if they so choose.



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