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Can anyone teach me about axes?

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CX

posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 04:58 PM
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I know absoloutely nothing about axes, have only ever used one in the garden to cut crappy little logs for the fire, and that axe was a cheapy one that was rubbish.

So i look to you guys and gals to educate me in what to look for in a good axe if you would be so kind.


Ideally i would be after something that could go in a BOB, or strapped to the side.

Age old question, does size really matter? Does big mean better? Or will that Gerber sport effort happily hack down a tree with the best of them?

Thanks for any info on this, it really is a subject i know very little about. I have a recently bought Cold Steel Kukhri Machete, which seems very hardy and with a little playing about with the edge, could take down smaller trees after a while.

I'm just not sure whether i actualy need an axe if i have a machete? I'd imagine the axe is more robust yes?

Opinions most appreciated.

Thanks,

CX.

[edit on 1/9/09 by CX]




posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 05:03 PM
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For camping, A solid 10 dollar wooden handled camp axe from a hardware store will take care of your needs for small logs, splitting kindling and the like.

Machetes are excellent but not for splitting. You can drive a machete or long knife through a small log with another log but they usually are more pricey than a simple camp axe and can break.

If you can spare the room and carry the weight, they are simple and effective.

----------------------------------------

For the home, light splitting can be done with a single blade general purpose axe.

Heavy splitting is done with a maul or wedges and a sledge maul.

Double bit axes are for loggers and not likely to be needed unless you chop logs on a regular basis.

Go to the hardware store and look at them. Pick them up and see what feels right to you. Don't worry about fancy ones; simple, solid and reasonably priced will take care of business for you.



[edit on 053030p://f09Tuesday by badgerprints]


CX

posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 05:16 PM
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Thanks for that info.


To be honest at a push i was thinking of getting a smaller axe for small trees, but i suddenly had a thought the other day when i made the thread about longer lasting dwellings like log cabins.

It's all well and good building a cabin, but what have i gotthat can chop decent thickness logs?

All i have is a machete, a Bahco Woodlander folding saw, and thats it.

So i figured an axe will be next on the shopping list.

Thanks again, i'll go have a look at them next time i'm in the hardware shop.

CX.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 05:21 PM
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use w/e works efficiently. a big axe might not be good for people that cant control it easily. its all about control.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 05:24 PM
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reply to post by CX
 

There's sure-enough axes, and then you have shorter camp axes.

The full size axes, for example by Plumb, are usually single bit or double bit.

The backside of the single bit can be used for driving posts, rods, or more aggressive interrogations. (That was a joke.)

The longer the handle, the greater the velocity, the greater energy imparted.

But they're also not very light weight.

A camp axe in a survival situation can be a fair compromise. You'll have to stick to moderate logs and will have to do more work, but you don't have to carry as much.

Think about including a folding saw. Light weight and aggressive against logs.

I have a six foot cross cut saw from the 1920's and I'm leaving that big SOB behind.

Weight. You'll be amazed at what you'll cast off because it's too heavy for practical carry/end use.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 06:05 PM
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i gotta say that when i was younger, from around 11 to 18, i could work all day with an axe splitting and cutting down trees approx 12" or less in diameter...it's all about rythm and technique...strength really isn't a factor unless you're swinging a piano for an axe...my shoulders are shot from wrestling and baseball, so i can't go all day but i'm still pretty handy with one...only takes about an hour to find my rythm again, sometimes less depending on energy levels and such

but for me, a small camp axe would do the trick, you could always find a way to modify a longer handle to get more leverage if you needed....maybe consider making a stone axe for larger jobs once established in a survlval situation?

i see nobody has brought up benefits of saw vs. axe since they've both been discussed in this topic, anyone care to chime in? i'd love to hear it



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 06:07 PM
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I agree with dooper, a saw will take down trees easier, and quieter than an axe. Look at a bowsaw, they are light, can be had in different sizes and spare blades are readily carried.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 08:48 PM
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reply to post by CX
 


Just tell me if I'm starting to haunt you CX. lol Basically there are 2 types of acxes with variants of each - felling axes for chopping down trees, and limbing axes for cutting off the branches. Unless you plan on cutting down a lot of trees an axe may not be your best choice in tools. Bowsaws are far easier for felling trees but I stilll preffered ny limbing axe for the cleanup. If you plan on carrying it I would definitely say no - way too heavy and bulky. It would be pretty badass in a gunless fight though. A great book on the subject is called Bushcraft by Mors Kochansky. He tells you everything you need to know about using axes and knives as well as sharpening and tool care. Hope that helps ya.


[edit on 1-9-2009 by Asktheanimals]



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 08:52 PM
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careful with that axe Eugene

2nd line



posted on Sep, 2 2009 @ 03:45 AM
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I carry a hand forged 18th century tomahawk. Great for cutting, can use the back or side to hammer tent spikes or smash stuff, could technically use it as a flint striker for fires. Can use it to chop bones or chop up a carcass to cook. It's also made for throwing, which can be useful for self defense, hunting, and just plain ol fun.
It's 19" long and weighs only about 1 3/4 lbs, the blade also has a notch to help keep it in place on your belt...it's also referred to as a "belt axe"

Part of my revolutionary war reenacting stuff...


CX

posted on Sep, 2 2009 @ 04:31 AM
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Originally posted by Asktheanimals
reply to post by CX
 


Just tell me if I'm starting to haunt you CX. lol


Lol not at all, i appreciate the advice. Saves me wasting money and possibly injuring myself with the wrong gear.


Mors is a legend in the bushcraft community, so i'll definately check out that book, thank you for that.

Thanks everyone for the your very imformative replies, a lot to think about.


I have this saw, the Bahco Laplander, and as yet it's never struggled with anything. I like the advice about splitting logs with the saw on this vid, i never knew that one.



It cuts both ways so it goes through wood like butter. The only thing you'd need is replacement blades, as i'm not sure if you can sharpen these out in the woods?

CX.



posted on Sep, 2 2009 @ 04:43 AM
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Buy yourself two full sized axes on for splitting wood the other for field work .. the one for splitting should be heavy with a wedge head... as to that second one you'll want to cut down the handle to make it easier to swing when working odd angles or around obstacles how much to cut the handle is the length from your elbow to the tips of your fingers... cut your sledge hammer handles that way too makes them so much easier to work with...use friction tape to give you a better grip... Buy yourself a rasp and good wet stone too you want to keep those axes sharp...



posted on Sep, 2 2009 @ 06:33 AM
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Originally posted by CX

Originally posted by Asktheanimals
reply to post by CX
 


Just tell me if I'm starting to haunt you CX. lol


Lol not at all, i appreciate the advice. Saves me wasting money and possibly injuring myself with the wrong gear.


Mors is a legend in the bushcraft community, so i'll definately check out that book, thank you for that.

Thanks everyone for the your very imformative replies, a lot to think about.


I have this saw, the Bahco Laplander, and as yet it's never struggled with anything. I like the advice about splitting logs with the saw on this vid, i never knew that one.

It cuts both ways so it goes through wood like butter. The only thing you'd need is replacement blades, as i'm not sure if you can sharpen these out in the woods?

CX.



Great trick! I've never tried that one before, not so sure it would on anything other than very, very dry (or in ray mears case, rotted) wood.
nonetheless, good stuff. Ill have to get one of those laplanders and compare it to my gerber. thanks for the info cx!


CX

posted on Sep, 2 2009 @ 06:45 AM
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Originally posted by Asktheanimals

Great trick! I've never tried that one before, not so sure it would on anything other than very, very dry (or in ray mears case, rotted) wood.
nonetheless, good stuff.


Lol i just noticed that, good point.


Anything but extremely dry or rotted wood, and i'd probably break my hand withthe shock of smacking it on the log.


Cheers.

CX.



posted on Sep, 2 2009 @ 07:16 AM
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I don't use an axe much these days. But, I have owned the little pack axe from gerber for quite some time. It is good for limbing and splitting kindling and it will certainly take down saplings. It holds a nice edge and is light and compact. It comes in other sizes as well.

Best of all, it easily fits in an exterior pouch on a backpack and the price is right.

www.gerberstore.com...



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