The Mozart Effect

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posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 05:55 PM
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reply to post by Next_Heap_With
 


In other words, when you`re watching a movie and classical music comes on, do you feel you are being "forced" to listen to it?




posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 06:01 PM
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reply to post by NW111
 


Gotta love the symbolism in the set. Looks loosley Kabbalistic. The doors look like they refer to the three pillars of the tree of life but the left and right look reversed (Vernunft-Reason, Weisheit-Wisdom, Natur-Nature). There's a tau cross back there just below the pyramid. Hmmm.

Heck, there's even Obama's campaign logo.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 06:03 PM
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Originally posted by Skyfloating
reply to post by Next_Heap_With
 


In other words, when you`re watching a movie and classical music comes on, do you feel you are being "forced" to listen to it?


I choose to watch the movie..and i know movies (most of them) have music scores..sooo...no i don't feel force..



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 06:08 PM
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reply to post by Next_Heap_With
 


You`re right. If it were forced everywhere, it would become annoying rather than enjoyable.

I dont have a problem with experimental research on it though.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 06:13 PM
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Originally posted by Skyfloating
reply to post by Next_Heap_With
 


You`re right. If it were forced everywhere, it would become annoying rather than enjoyable.

I dont have a problem with experimental research on it though.


Yeah, it can become annoying..

listening to music is a very nice experience..i want to have that experience in my terms not in their terms...



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 06:30 PM
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Anyone out there who has any experimental/research experiences with different types of music?



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 06:32 PM
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Originally posted by Skyfloating
Anyone out there who has any experimental/research experiences with different types of music?


Any music can change your state of mind..it depends in your taste...

Some people relax with heavy metal..some get anxiety attacks with heavy metal.. it all depends on YOU the listener...



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 06:33 PM
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I forgot to mention, where I used to love there was a lovely book shop that was once a church, they used to play classical in there at a moderate volume and it was a really nice relaxing place to be... of course it isn't there any more.

I think music can be really intrusive - especially kids with super-loud mobile phones on public transport and supermarkets drive me insane with that horrible piped-in junk, but I'd really welcome classical on public transport, in schools, libraries, even hospitals.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 06:36 PM
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Originally posted by Next_Heap_With
Any music can change your state of mind..it depends in your taste...

Some people relax with heavy metal..some get anxiety attacks with heavy metal.. it all depends on YOU the listener...


Its not all placebo. Just as various drugs have specific effects independent of ME, various music has specific effects independent of ME.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 06:38 PM
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Originally posted by jokei
I forgot to mention, where I used to love there was a lovely book shop that was once a church, they used to play classical in there at a moderate volume and it was a really nice relaxing place to be... of course it isn't there any more.

I think music can be really intrusive - especially kids with super-loud mobile phones on public transport and supermarkets drive me insane with that horrible piped-in junk, but I'd really welcome classical on public transport, in schools, libraries, even hospitals.


SMS-ringtones is probably the worst music humanity has ever produced.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 06:45 PM
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Originally posted by Skyfloating
One thing that surprised me in reading up on this subject is that classical music seems to have a more beneficial effect than contemporary "relaxing music" or modern music that was specifically designed to have a beneficial effect. Why that might be, I dont know.


Maybe something like this.



So what makes Mozart special? No-one knows for sure but there are a number of theories. There does seem to be a correlation between the rhythmic qualities of Mozart's compositions and some of the rhythmic cycling of our own brain waves, that a Mozart sonata is in fact 'mimicking' the pattern of electrical firing of neurons within our brain.

SOURCE


I always wondered that maybe artists with special inspiration tune in on these internal patterns.

Like mentioned in this thread for example.
Hearing Music Before you fall Asleep.
Where i made the following post.


Originally posted by jaamaan

Originally posted by The time lord
Sometimes the music is really creative, tunes I never heard before occur and its random, so for me to make music up with an intelligent melody in the space of a few seconds means I have to be either really smart or something else goes on that I do not know. If the mind can produce music or solve problems in your sleep it’s a shame we cannot remember the solution or be able to express it, in terms of the music, I can't write music and in terms of remembering it clearly it’s almost impossible.


i know what you mean and i can hear the music from time to time.
My personal conclusionis that the(my) brain can recal or make this up completely in realtime lets say.
Songs that i know can come by when i fall a sleep whit every detail in it, bass, drumms, vocals etc.
At rare occasions by brain seems to make up complete classical symphonies right out of nothingness.
I allways joke to myselfs that if i could record this somehow i would be publishing some.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 06:46 PM
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reply to post by Skyfloating
 


And that reiterates my point on how we choose to interpret music.

Personality definitely reflects our taste of music.

So as I stated, more than likely, people with a higher intelligence listen to Mozart. Those same people sees one of their purposes in life to become smarter. In conclusion, they choose classical music and "interpret" it in a "intelligent" manner.

If there is some party person who wants to get pumped up, they might choose some aggressive music, because their brain interprets it in a way that puts them in a certain mood.

I will say it again. The MUSIC doesn't make you smarter. It is the person and how they interpret/analyze the music they listen to.

Smarter people may benefit more from it, but like I said, the music itself does not give out IQ points.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 07:12 PM
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I have to add more.



The Secret Life of Plants explores some of these creative byproducts that are even now under development around the world. Remarkably enough, one such seems to have been anticipated in its conception, if not in actual use, a few thousand years ago. According to Pythagoras, all things including celestial bodies (which he considered animate, sentient organisms) move in fundamentally harmonic, vibratory relationships with each other, producing a majestic symphony of life -- the Music of the Spheres. Plato, developing an aspect of this idea, highly recommended the study and performance of music in education. Moreover, he felt that only certain modes of music should be played, according to the temperament of the individual, in an effort to refine and bring forth the higher nature of the soul.

Modern research is now indicating that music, of the proper 'mode,' does bring forth the better nature of plants -- in increased and improved quality of production. (Cf. Sunrise, April 1973, "Threads of Coincidence," for accounts of Hindu and Hopi Indian knowledge of music's effect on plant growth.) Besides this potential boon to agriculture, there is another facet of observation which plants may be revealing: the effect of various types of music on the quality of growth of our own souls. Tompkins and Bird describe in some detail the work done by Dorothy Retallack, whose efforts were recorded by CBS-TV news cameras and broadcast on October 16, 1970.

Required to devise an experiment for a college biology class, Mrs. Retallack, having heard about the positive effects of Bach and Beethoven on wheat fields in Canada, sought to determine how music would affect growth patterns in plants. In sum, the plants placed in a controlled environment reacted favorably, growing faster and more abundantly, to the harmonic strains of the classical composers -- in some cases actually growing in the direction of the music. Highly percussive sounds, especially the 'hard Rock' of Jimi Hendrix and the like, stunted them in their growth and they often leaned away from the hi-fi speaker. The most appealing music, on the other hand, was not Western, but rather the quarter-tone slitherings of Ravi Shankar's sitar, a type of Indian lute capable of producing the most refined and subtle tonal modulations. In some cases the plants inclined an unprecedented sixty degrees to the horizontal in an effort to merge with the musical source. Despite the inferences which could be very easily drawn, it is only fair to point out that these are the recorded reactions of plants, not people.

SOURCE


So it shows here that it is not only classical music that can create these effects.
But effects are clearly measured on living things like humans and plants.
The effects are widely studied, you just have to find the right angles in i think.
The study of plants and music is one i found in this book years ago:
Secret Life of Plants



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by Skyfloating
 


As a subscriber of New Scientist for nearly twenty years I've come across this effect a number of times. When at uni and pulling an all nighter to meet a deadline I always ended up with classical on my headphones. It made me calmer, helped me think more clearly and analytically as well enabling me to drown myself in the job at hand without distraction. I've also been subjected to classical music many times over the years in retail situations where tempers can get frayed, such as in queues. Even so this was still a slap forehead moment as soon as I saw the thread.

I consider myself amongst the ranks of the 'awaken', but it just goes to show that we should always be on guard, and prepared to challenge our perceptions (so my therapist says).

Thanks a lot Sky! Another avenue for me to research!


To any naysayers out there there is a lot of peer reviewed research on this one so don't be so quick to label this bunkum. Something else people forget is that much of this classical music was the pop music of the day and it's only been since the 20th century that people have begun to categorize it as boring and not for the masses.

[edit on 30-8-2009 by sharps]



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by NW111
 


Just quick info, Mozart was a 32 degree and this song "the magic flute" is an homage to Masonry



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 07:56 PM
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Originally posted by FritosBBQTwist
Personality definitely reflects our taste of music.

So as I stated, more than likely, people with a higher intelligence listen to Mozart. Those same people sees one of their purposes in life to become smarter. In conclusion, they choose classical music and "interpret" it in a "intelligent" manner.

I will say it again. The MUSIC doesn't make you smarter. It is the person and how they interpret/analyze the music they listen to.

Smarter people may benefit more from it, but like I said, the music itself does not give out IQ points.


i think there's a stigma associated with classical music in our culture. almost every time there's classical music in a movie it's when a psychopath kills someone or sets up some mass destruction device. too bad actually.

i've been in love with vivaldi since i was a kid and used to go to a catholic church to listen to their concerts during college. luckily there are a few classical radio stations in my area so i can listen while driving or at work. it's very relaxing and always lifts my spirits up! though most of the time i have no idea what i'm listening to


but maybe i'm just too old for today's music which mostly copies stuff that was already created up to the 1980s



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 08:51 PM
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Yes i beleive music can do that to some people.I listen to country,blues and rock music all the time.Uufortunatly i am one who does not like classical music.I think classical music is for snobs.I think the italian classical music is the best of the lot anyway.Hearing classical music in italian i could listen to some songs.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 09:51 PM
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reply to post by Skyfloating
 


There is even a Mozart effect on plants.
The vibrations in the air.
A professor conducted tests.
Same soil. Same seeds.
10 different greenhouses.
One greenhouse Mozart. --Very Positive Effect--
One greenhouse nothing at all.---------Base Line ----------
One greenhouse just the spoken words of Charlie Rose.--Very Positive--
One greenhouse loud Metalica Hard Rock music. --Negative Effect--




posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 09:57 PM
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for your continued reflection and introspection...

The Four Seasons...

Spring...
www.bing.com...

Summer...
www.bing.com...

Fall...
www.bing.com...

Winter...
www.bing.com...



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 09:59 PM
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And to close the night...


J.S. Bach...

Toccata and Fugue in D Minor...

www.bing.com...





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