"Study Says World's Stocks Controlled by Select Few"

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posted on Sep, 3 2009 @ 06:22 PM
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reply to post by open_eyeballs
 

They get the exclusive schooling that does exactly what you said...teaches them ways to preserve their wealth and how to manipulate policies to limit the competition..if you will...
Then we hear about facade style politics that do nothing but distract the general public...n. korea. iran...
hal these pricks kids go to the same schools in switzerland as the elite of the U.K. and the United States!
Weyhey! We survived the blather & made it back on topic!
Yeah, limiting competition is what the real PTB are all about. That is exactly how they keep their wealth insulated from the market, by fostering the illusion of "the free market". In reality, there is no such thing, regardless of whether people get together in some boardroom, or smokey chamber, to fix prices, the large corporations are a de facto cartel. The very richest win on matter what the economic conditions: stocks go up, they're in profit; stocks go down, their hedgefund is in profit; market crashes, they buy up everything with potential cheap, then are in profit when the market recovers - meantime the competition has folded.
Still, many of them do know each other personally too. This thread by symmetricAvenger traces a lot of the relationships between American PTB:
www.abovetopsecret.com...
He gets hung up on the whole jewish conspiracy angle, but the research into the people is pretty good.
See, thats another distraction: the jews are taking over... run for your foreskin! Like it matters what religion modern westerners are when they've got that kind of money!
Re: OP
I hope you'll keep us posted on any names those scientists do release.




posted on Sep, 3 2009 @ 08:30 PM
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It seems that we are pretty much on the same page with most of this stuff.

I wouldn't divide the various groups of the PTB by Bilderberg type stuff. I would divide them by industry. We have the oil conglomerates, media conglomerates, financial conglomerates, and so on. There groups are mainly concerned with controlling and expanding their markets irregardless of the consequences, and squeezing employees as much as possible so that all the money goes to the top, irregardless of how much they contributed.

I am fully supportive of a federal healthcare system. Being that we send all that money to the fed for income taxes, and we aren't getting anything back, I think having government paid health insurance is exactly what we should be getting back for our money.

The middle class shouldn't be expected to pay back the huge debts created to give huge tax cuts to the super rich, nor should the middle class be expected to pay for our ridiculously huge military which mainly operates overseas to protect international business.

Tax goods and services that cross state and national borders, because that is where the money should come from to pay the huge national debt and the cost of being the worlds only super power.

Oh, and creating a nationalized health care system would be a great way to stick it to the crooked insurance companies who greedily prey upon those who get sick. Good riddance to them.

The states can add to the federal system if they so desire.



posted on Sep, 4 2009 @ 10:48 AM
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reply to post by poet1b
 
Well, I wouldn't completely dismiss the Bilderberg Group, but it seems to me that most of them aren't the actual PTB, but more like the wannabes & favourite lackeys. I'd be suprised if there aren't schemes hatched amongst them tho.
Whether or not there is or isn't an actual formal get-together-to-plot conspiracy amongst the worlds richest hardly matters tho. By each doing whats best for themselves, which necessitates not rocking the boat too much, they are doing whats best for all of them, ie maintaining the status quo - the rich get richer; the poor get... the barest minimum the PTB can get away with before social disorder threatens their position.
An example: we can be rich too!
Buy your house, on a mortgage. Eventually you'll own it: you'll have equity - cool! Pay into your pension scheme too. Eventually, you'll have an income on top of the wealth from your house.
In the meantime all of your money gets invested, much of it in the very companies which create this system, & you have very little disposable income. By the time you are "rich" you're too old to do much with it anyway. Oh, but pass it on to your kids, right? Except have you noticed how the market keeps booming & busting? There's a good chance that you'll be caught out of synch with it. So that you invested when the market was rising & pass it on when its falling. Hmmm... perhaps thats not accidental? After all, who makes the investments that create job security so that workers feel confident to buy property, & who benefits when that investment turns out to be worth less than forecast? The same people, when your kids have to play the same game all over again.



posted on Sep, 7 2009 @ 12:33 PM
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reply to post by Bunken Drum
 


Yep, that is pretty much how they are trying to play the game.

This type of system has only been going on for a little over a century now. Basically, about five generations. Less for most of the U.S. population who were on farms up until around the fifties.

From the fifties til the eighties, most people in the U.S. lived and worked in what you could call factory towns, where most dads worked at the factory, and made enough money to buy a house, while mom stayed home to take care of the kids. It was a good life and the middle class grew steadily. At the beginning of the eighties, income distribution was as even as it has ever been in the U.S.. Then things began to fall apart.

There were numerous factors that contributed to the changes that have reshaped the U.S. economy over the last three decades.

First there was the energy crisis, the most likely was created on purpose to stir up problems. The U.S. was in love with their big automobiles, and they were all gas guzzlers. When the energy crisis hit, it gave Japan, with its smaller far more efficient vehicles to gain a hold on the U.S. auto market.

Also, around that time, U.S. manufacturers began moving jobs overseas, where they could pay far less for workers. This began the breaking of the unions which had created the good wages and the growing middle class.

The existence of the boomer generation created an over abundance of highly skilled workers which also pushed down wages. At the same time, the large numbers of the boomers also pushed up the price of housing, which ramped up home values at an unprecedented state, that simply can not be sustained.

During he eighties, the Reagan admin put most of the countries money into the military industrial complex, which concentrated workers in suburbs, creating long commutes, which added to the rise of home prices even more, as people were forced to move to the areas where there were jobs in the Military industrial complex.

The boomers also have pushed up the market. By investing their retirements in the stock market, the large numbers of people putting money into the stock market has pushed it to new heights as well.

Now that the boomers are starting to retire, they will be now pulling money out in unprecedented numbers. It will be interesting to see how the market takes this strain.

Those at the beginning of the baby boom have had it made. If you were established before 1980, life has been very good. Those who have followed the boomers, however, have had to deal with a system that seeks to squeeze ever more out of them, while closing off opportunity where ever possible.

What is clear is that working for a corporation has turned into a lousy deal for all too many these days. All workers are expendable to the corporate entity. You are far better off building your own wealth through your own business. However, people have been fooled into supporting people who have greatly stacked the odds in favor of corporations.

The next step would be to find a way to throw off the yoke of corporate power.





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