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Foraging for Food

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posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 11:34 PM
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Very interesting, I too have noticed a far fewer amount of dandelion plants this year, both in south england and north sweden. Which is very curious seeing a how nutritious dandelions are, and how widespread the areas are. Not only can you use the petals (and flower) and the root but the leaf is also nutritious as a salad leaf, even if slightly bitter. I quite like them tho.




posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 11:38 PM
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Sometimes there is just no getting around the necessity of foraging for food.

I recommend the dumpsters behind 4 and 5 Star French Restaurants for this! The early wee hours of the morning are best for this. Some of my favorites are the unsold pastries especially those with fresh fruit and chocolate sauce! Other delicacies to look for is the Chocolate Soufflé with Best Sauce, but of course it pays to look for those prized Tornadeus of Beef braised in a Cognac Demi-Glaze Sauce with some baby asparagus and New Potato A Gratin. Avoid the Steak Tartars if you possible can and anything that looks like it has raw eggs added to it.

I can’t stress how important it is to bring your own clean doilies and of course an appropriate wine!

Tie is optional!


[edit on 30/8/09 by ProtoplasmicTraveler]



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 09:53 AM
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reply to post by Clockwork Heart
 


This is true.
You know, most people consider the dandelion to be like a weed. But you can actually use the whole plant.
When you go to a restaurant often times raviolli is stuffed with, what amounts to be, dandelion leaves and stems.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 09:56 AM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 





I don't think I'll be foraging behind dumpsters anytime soon.
The economy hasn't gotten quite that bad.

But I do like picking wild food while I'm out hiking.

Last spring I netted some serious cash picking morels.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 10:07 AM
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reply to post by maus80
 


I've never eaten a mayapple.
I keep hearing they are really good, though. Any time I find the plant it either has no fruit on it or the fruit isn't ripe.

A couple more: Red Sumac, Sassafrass and Polk.
All of the above require homework before you pick them, however.

All of these can be dangerous if you don't know what you're looking at, or pick it at the wrong time of the year. The sumac must be the red variety. The white is dangerous.
Sassafrass and Polk must be picked early in the season, as they turn poisonous later.
But, the sumac leaves are very tasty (a black bear's favorite) and make a good wine. Sassafrass makes a nutritious tea and polk makes a salad that will blow spinach out of the water.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 10:44 AM
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Here's a couple of easy pickings here in VA and probably the southeastern US -

Stinging nettle - young leaves are really tasty as boilded greens.

Plantain (plantago major, plantago minor) - Common yard weed. Young leaves are stringy, but good. Tick repellant and anit-microbial. good for burns parboiled and mashed.

Kudzu - The root can be crushed and filtered to extract the starch, dry and make flour. Chinese medicine has many uses for kudzu. Grows along railroads but be careful as they spray herbicides/defoliants.

Greenbriars - Young leaves and tendrils are excellent.

Sassafras - young leaves are great and make great flavoring for stews.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 10:52 AM
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Originally posted by JayinAR
reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 





I don't think I'll be foraging behind dumpsters anytime soon.
The economy hasn't gotten quite that bad.

But I do like picking wild food while I'm out hiking.

Last spring I netted some serious cash picking morels.


Hey Jay that sounds like serious fun and a great way to make some extra cash.

I do believe the only thing you would scrounge up here in Miami Beach is discarded edible bikini bottoms!

Of course the oceans and canals are full of fish though.

You know what they say...give a man a fish and he can eat...teach a man to fish and he has an excuse to drink beer!



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 10:54 AM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 


Damn the briars.

I hate the things. This is why reluctant to even put blackberries on the list.

Nah, not really.
I have never heard of eating leaves of the greenbriar. I'm going to try it. Thanks.

Here is another one. Thistle.
If you carefully take all of the spines off of the stalk, you can chew on the stalk. Lots of water and nutrients.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 10:56 AM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


Hey, edible bikini bottoms!
(puts that on his list of things to look for)

But yeah, picking morels is fun. Especially when you find a patch of them. To me I kinda envision a little section that is going into the frying pan and the rest have dollar signs hanging over them!



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 11:05 AM
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Here is one I have always eaten but never knew the actual name for it untill today.
Mallow



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 11:08 AM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 


South Florida would actually be a great place to be dirt poor and homeless with a little ambition. Coconuts, bananas, avacados, mangos, passion fruits, cashews, oranges, grapefruits, lemons, limes, and persimons litterally grow everywhere often on trees on private propery where the owners litterally let them fall right off the branches right on to public walkways and roads.

There are times of the year when walking outside you actually have to be careful about what might fall off a tree and hit you on the head!



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 11:11 AM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


Oh, this is very true.
I've often thought that I could always just go back to Hawaii and live as a beach bum.
Tons of food stuffs to be found in the world's tropical places.

Avacadoes are one of my favorites.
Not to mention all the fish.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 


Pine,Spruce,Sweet Birch,Slippery Elm these are just a few. Also, sugar maple trees can be tapped in winter and the sap eaten...it has beneficial nutrients.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 02:27 PM
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totally dependent hawaii would be a deathtrap when tshtf,at least for oahu.
the most isolated land mass on earth that is totally dependent on tourism,military welfare,ships and planes that rely on oil to bring in over- priced gallons of milk and wilted lettuce,etc.
lived in honolulu for a year a few years ago and my stuff is still in storage there,but feel the pacific nw/western canada would be better suited for long term survival.
after the looting and rioting and die off,overpopulated oahu would quickly revert back to the age old traditions of the spiritual native hawaiians - cannibalism.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 03:52 PM
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reply to post by nowayjose
 


There is no need for cannibalism when you are smack-dab in the middle of one of the world's largest fisheries.
Milk is expensive?
Drink coconut milk.

Fruit abounds the Islands wild.

I think you are just upset with the prices of stuff over there. I'm not talking about buying anything.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 03:53 PM
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reply to post by Greenize
 


Thanks for the reply, but I was more wondering about which types of Pine trees it is easy to get the pine nut from.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 


I was actually reading up on this last night and if I understand correctly, any pine cone producing tree that has reached at least 8 years of maturity. I will research more this evening and post my findings....



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 05:56 PM
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reply to post by Greenize
 


Cool.
I appreciate it. It is a question I have often seen asked. I would like to know as I will start collecting pinenuts.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 09:12 PM
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Originally posted by calstorm
Here is one I have always eaten but never knew the actual name for it untill today.
Mallow


Thats malva neglecta or cheese mallow - the fruits are good raw, boiled or fried like okra.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 09:29 PM
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Originally posted by JayinAR
reply to post by Greenize
 


Thanks for the reply, but I was more wondering about which types of Pine trees it is easy to get the pine nut from.



Pinon pine which grows in the mountains of SW US is where the big , yummy ones come from that you get in the store. I've tried many species
but the nuts are ridiculously small. It takes literally dozens to make a tiny palmful, not sure they're worth the effort.

Forgot to mention that sassafrass is edible at all stages, It isn't like Pokeweed which is only edible when very young or the berries ONLY WHEN DRIED. All other plant parts are very poisonous.

[edit on 30-8-2009 by Asktheanimals]



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