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Jaycee Lee Dugard girls were like 'brainwashed zombies'

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posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 04:45 PM
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Jaycee Lee Dugard girls were like 'brainwashed zombies'


www.dailymail.co.uk

Police have admitted said a neighbour made an emergency call in 2006 to say that her captor was a 'psychotic' with a sex addiction and had children living in tents in his back garden in Antioch, California.

Officers went to the house but did not ask to see the garden. Instead they told Garrido, who had served a jail sentence for kidnap and rape, that local housing rules meant children could not camp out there.

Her secret prison was a 10ft by 10ft shed, with a door that could only be opened from the outside, another shed and two tents.

Garrido was a registered sex offender after ser
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.mirror.co.uk
www.examiner.com
www.truecrimereport.com




posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 04:45 PM
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This guy should have never gotten out of prison in the first place. He had kidnapped a woman, and imprisoned her in a storage facility, and apparently did all kinds of things to this woman. He should have stayed in prison until 2026.

It is almost as if nutcases like this are freed to prey upon the public in order to keep people paranoid. This clearly was a situation that was completely avoidable in the first place.

Stories like this clearly reverberate through the public's psyche. You can almost feel the energy sucked out of people.



www.dailymail.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 04:54 PM
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That really makes my skin scrawl. I mean I am very happy for that family for find their little girl, but things will never be the same.

Those children will never be able to live normal lives after the trauma they have endured. It simply breaks my heart to hear of human beings treating others this way.

I agree with you, this man should have been in prison and stayed there. Odds are if he goes back the other prisoners will take care of him. They aren't too keen on diddlers in the slammer.

At least this story had a somewhat happy ending.

Love and Hope to those involved.

~Keeper



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 04:56 PM
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Here is additional story line.

www.truecrimereport.com...


Garrido was 25 and working as a musician in Reno when he abducted the 25-year-old victim, who was a casino worker. A November 1976 account of the crime in the Nevada State Journal told of Garrido knocking on the window of the victim's car, claiming his own vehicle was disabled. He asked for a ride.

They had only driven a short distance when the woman said Garrido grabbed her. He slapped on handcuffs and taped her mouth. They drove to Reno and the storage unit where Garrido assaulted her.

It appeared to investigating officers that Garrido had turned the unit into a residence, even though his address was elsewhere in the city. Detectives found a regular 70s-era sexual predator's bachelor pad - rugs on the floors and walls, porno mags, a projector, "marital aids," wine, hot water and oddly, a spotlight.

Chillingly, another woman in the area reported after Garrido's arrest that he had tried to kidnap her before he succeeded with the casino worker.


Considering that this guy is clearly a nutcase, how was he ever set free?

It almost seems intentional that this guy was set loose. You would think that this guy would be someone closely watched. You would also think that large property he occupied would be searched.

I would think that they would have searched this guys property when the girl was first kidnapped, and everytime some woman or girl disappears. How many other nutcases like this are out there being ignored by the police.



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by poet1b
 


One word for you friend.

Overcrowding.

They've been releasing offenders who are clearly crazy for decades simply because the prison system does not have anywhere to put them and taxpayers are tired of footing the bill.

~Keeper



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by poet1b
 



How many other nutcases like this are out there being ignored by the police.



These are questions we try not to ask ourselves as we're falling asleep at night and when we read or see these cases in the media

We try not to ask, for good reason. Because we know, deep down, that there are nowhere enough police or sufficient checks and balances and never will be, never have been.

The authorities know it too. As they say, they're stretched to full capacity just trying to keep the lid on the can.



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 


Yeah, and from my understanding they are letting out these types of nutcases, while keeping non-violent drug offenders in prison.

Who are we going to let out, this whacked out kidnapper/rapist, or this guy we caught dealing coke out of his suburban home to subsidize his income?

Well, the kidnapper/rapist is sure to stir up more business, let's go with him.

It sure isn't anything like CSI.



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 05:11 PM
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reply to post by St Vaast
 


The problem isn't a lack of police, or checks, the problem is lack of competent police and federal agents. They all look like geniuses on night time TV shows, but in the news, they come like the Keystone cops.

Come on, some young girl is grabbed in broad daylight in a very bold manner.

Hmm, let's check the rap sheets. Well, we have this guy paroled a few years ago who grabbed a woman in her car, and held her captive not too far from here. Apparently he is now living on this large fenced in property. Maybe we should pay him a visit.

How did this not happen?



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 05:22 PM
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Everytime a female disappears, they should have had the dogs sniffing around this guys property. His backyard should be full of police dog dodo, and every tree, bush and shrub well marked.

They searched his house, but not that huge backyard?

Seriously, where is the outrage?

How could this level of incompetence be overlooked?



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 05:25 PM
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Originally posted by poet1b
reply to post by St Vaast
 


The problem isn't a lack of police, or checks, the problem is lack of competent police and federal agents. They all look like geniuses on night time TV shows, but in the news, they come like the Keystone cops.

Come on, some young girl is grabbed in broad daylight in a very bold manner.

Hmm, let's check the rap sheets. Well, we have this guy paroled a few years ago who grabbed a woman in her car, and held her captive not too far from here. Apparently he is now living on this large fenced in property. Maybe we should pay him a visit.

How did this not happen?




Have you ever worked in the retail industry, for example ?

We owned three businesses simultaneously. Highly competitive field. Every single day, every employee was required to keep a book on enquiries, complaints, follow-up, substandard-product, returned items, etc.

Every evening, we ran these through. Naturally, with three businesses and umpteen full and part-time employees, we were compelled to rely on employee disclosure. Some were great, others not.

Problems fell through the net, no matter how hard we tried. And we only discovered these when they emerged. For example, someone might phone and we (employers) might answer that one phone-call by chance .. to learn that a complain tendered six weeks ago had not been resolved by the employee in question.

So, we'd speak with the employee: ' Why didn't you follow through with Mr. So and So's complaint/faulty item ? '. And invariably (and truthfully) the employee would reply that he'd meant to .. had meant to the following day and the next. But it had been pushed from the front by subsequent problems, complaints, faulty item .. plus all the other matters to be attended to several times a day.

Was Mr. So and So's complaint valid ? Sure it was.

Had the employee meant to resolve it ? Sure he had. But the issue had slipped to the back, then further back, then forgotten.

Employees come and go. Police and investigators likewise.

Big bubble of media attention when a child is taken/goes missing.
But then another child is taken/goes missing.

Investigating officers retire, die, are transferred, are put on other cases, etc.

There's always too much to do, too few to do it and even less who'll do it thoroughly.

Creeps like the offenders in the Jacee Lee Dugard case are everywhere. They're like rats ... for every one you see, there are forty who're there but which you haven't seen.

We're all walking across the ice, all the time. The creeps are there, hidden, waiting. The ice could break at any time. The police know it. We do too. But we manage to ignore it and keep crossing that ice, until a case like this breaks the news. Then we realise our vulnerability .. and realise the flaws in what in reality can only be a less than perfect system.

As you say, tv and movies portray a dedication and conscientiousness on the part of law-enforcement and the legal-system which differs substantially from reality



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 05:38 PM
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For example, several times in the past year or so, the media has detailed a murder/attempted murder by their spouse or someone contracted by the spouse.

In the several instances to which I've referred, the media has stated that the murder was investigated or prevented because the murderous-spouse attempted to arrange the contract with 'an undercover officer'

Think of the odds. How many undercover officers are there at any one time (in our country here, of just 21 million) ?

What are the odds of a murderous-spouse 'striking out' as it were, and attempting to employ an undercover-officer to commit murder ? The odds must be several thousand or more to one

Which compels us to consider all those who successfully arrange with friends, friends of friends and 'underworld contacts' to kill their spouses.

People die every day from a variety of causes. Many seem to be 'natural', such as traffic-accidents, drownings, heart-attacks, 'intruders', etc. Yet many of these are probably murders. The money is paid. The victims are buried. People grieve. Life goes on .. for the murderous spouse, society and law-enforcement



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 05:38 PM
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Just my humble opinion, of course, but what is the cost of a .38 calliber round these days?

All you'd need is one.

If that's too expensive, I have some rope. . . . .



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 05:40 PM
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I think headlines should be screaming about what really was a colossal failure on the part of police authorities.

How could a sex offender, who was sentenced for fifty years because of the seriousness of his crime, released due to overcrowding, keep a kidnapped girl on his property for 18 years?

Seriously, it makes no sense. It seems beyond incompetence on the part of the police.

It is not like this girl was buried in some secret underground bunker. She was living in his backyard. Clearly this nutjob was no mastermind.

This guy had even been arrested a couple of time while this young girl was being held captive. They also are suspicious of some bodies of hookers dumped near a place where he used to work.

A what point do people start to question the competence of the authorities who over looked this guy for so long.



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by poet1b
 


I know. I agree

They're out there booking people for traffic infringements and searching vehicles for two grains of dope

Have to keep that revenue rolling in



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 06:08 PM
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reply to post by St Vaast
 


I did work in retail in high school.

Most people who work in retail don't make much money, so they don't care a great deal. It makes people harder to manage, especially if they are part time, looking for something more. Retail is a tough business to survive in.

These investigators are paid good money, with good retirement plans, and the kidnapping of a young girl should be a top priority. TOP PRIORITY

As far as nutjobs go, this kidnapper rapist stood out from the crowd, like a huge swollen thumb.

Considernig this guy had only been out on parol for 3 years, the nature of his crime, his location, and the property he was living on, he should have been at the top of the list of suspects.



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 06:12 PM
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reply to post by St Vaast
 


It is sad to say, but it seems if there is no money in it for them, they aren't interested.

Drug crime is profitable, murder and rape are not.



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 06:18 PM
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No comment on the case, but, having been a law enforcement officer AND at one time, a county commissioner, when tax receipts are spent on stupid stuff and police, fire and social work budgets are cut, people are either fired or not hired....so, population grows, but law enforcement doesn't......it is a matter of how many are on the street, how thin are they spread........If you want your tax money spent differently or would pay more taxes for more officers, GET VOCAL, CONTACT YOUR LOCAL LEGISLATORS!!!

don't blame the officer, who probably has to be very careful what he looks at, due to miranda and search and seizure laws........



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 06:21 PM
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90% of all crimes solved by the police are from leads provided to them through informants. The perfect crime in many ways is one that you commit alone, and tell not one living soul you committed said crime and chances are no matter what the crime is, if it was just you, and nobody but you who knows you did it, the police will never catch you.

It's a big world and the same rights that protect us from police harassment are the same rights that protect criminals from police harassment too.

Cases like this are the downside of those rights but who here wants to have an open door policy to any police officer any time of the day and night and to allow them to search all or part of your home any time of the day and night?

It's great to get outraged, to be angry, to want to hate someone and blame someone, but the reality is there are no gaurantees in life.

Want someone to blame?

Lets blame the Powers that Be for not paying the Step Father a living wage and the girl's mother had to work full time as a result too creating a latch key child easier to snatch.

Lets blame Harley Davidson for making the motor cycle that the perpetrator had an accident on and suffered permanent brain damage as a young adult turning him into a permanent nut case.

Lets blame the CIA for their '___' experiments that the perpetrator was addicted to before, during and after his motorcycle accident.

There is always some one to blame...

Me I would complain...but it does no good!



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 06:35 PM
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reply to post by habu71
 


Not from what I have seen, and I have family in law enforcement and friends.

Where I live, if you decide to plead not guilty to a traffic ticket, and miss your court date, they arrest you, even if you have made another appointment for a court appearance. If the police are that busy, then they shouldn't be arresting people for traffic tickets. It is a con.

It shouldn't be that hard to get a warrant to search someone's home when the guy is a convicted sex offender on parole, and someone has been kidnapped.



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


A guy who should still have been in jail for committing a horrendous crime and is on parole not have the same rights as everyone else.

The police shouldn't be able to search everyone's home on a whim, and that wouldn't have been the case here.

By the way, they already allow police to search if they see probably cause, so your rights to privacy were taken away a long time ago.

It is always the same excuses.




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