It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Connections among solar cycle, stratosphere and ocean discovered

page: 1
16
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 01:56 PM
link   
Now I am far from an expert in this field... However, was browsing the web today and stumbled upon this. Very interesting find, nonetheless...

Connections among solar cycle, stratosphere and ocean discovered


Subtle connections between the 11-year-solar cycle, the stratosphere and the tropical Pacific Ocean work in sync to generate periodic weather patterns that affect much of the globe, according to research results appearing this week in the journal Science.

The findings will help scientists get an edge on predicting the intensity of certain climate phenomena, such as the Indian monsoon and tropical Pacific rainfall, years in advance.

"It's been long known that weather patterns are well-correlated to very small variations in total solar energy reaching our planet during 11-year solar cycles," says Jay Fein, program director in the National Science Foundation (NSF)'s Division of Atmospheric Sciences, which funded the research. "What's been an equally long mystery, however, is how they are physically connected. This remarkable study is beginning to unravel that mystery."


Newly discovered interactions between the Sun and the Earth affect our climate.



Similar Links
Science Daily: Small Fluctuations In Solar Activity, Large Influence On Climate
Scientific America: Sunspots Stir Oceans
Space.com: Sun's Cycle Alters Earth's Climate

[edit on 28-8-2009 by tmayhew01]




posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 02:10 PM
link   
Another example of how complex the engines that drive climate are. A slight increase in solar energy (.1%) could trigger a series of changes that may result in lower sea surface temperatures in the eastern Pacific.

[edit on 8/28/2009 by Phage]



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 02:21 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


I'm a bit confused by what you are alluding to. In other threads regarding solar energy you tote the line of current science without speculating possibilities. However, when a new piece of science is discovered you readily accept it. Are you just a walking science fact person, and if not can you acknowledge others opinions of possibility rather than debunk speculation by using currently known scientific facts in the future?

This is more a rhetorical question...as I've noticed you have a lot of hard data to back your claims but rarely I've never seen you speculate possibilities.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 02:35 PM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
Another example of how complex the engines that drive climate are. A slight increase in solar energy (.1%) could trigger a series of changes that may result in lower sea surface temperatures in the eastern Pacific.

[edit on 8/28/2009 by Phage]


More interested in what a slight decrease would effect. Higher pacific temperatures? Seems kind of backwards. But perhaps with the lower solar activity it could explain all this anomolous weather?



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 02:58 PM
link   
reply to post by ExPostFacto
 

Maybe you misunderstood me. I have not "accepted" this. To me it's an interesting theory.

One thing that catches my interest is that this is not merely speculation about what might happen and it is not blindly saying that because some correlations have been observed between weather and solar cycles that there is a cause and effect relationship. It is providing a possible mechanism for the correlation. Another thing is that the theory is testable; if it is correct then el nino events which occur during solar max will be less intense than those which occur at solar minimum. Indeed, the models have produced results close to actual observations. I also enjoy the irony of increased solar radiation causing regional cooling.

A mechanism for an observed correlation and a verifiable model. It is these things that make this, and other theories, different from simple speculation. I have nothing against speculation if it is taken for what it is, filler used when there are insufficient facts. When facts, and genuine theories appear, it is time to leave the speculation behind...until something else comes along.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 03:06 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


I give you a star for answering my question without hostility. I've noticed a lot of scientific "theories" have exceptions to them. To me an exception to a theory is an indicator that a new theory needs to be made, which involves again speculating at possibilities.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 03:51 PM
link   
This really shows how lucky we are to have life on this planet and goes to show how fragile and touchy our existence really is. S&F!



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 06:57 PM
link   
A S&F to you.

It's rather interesting reading the article - it didn't mention Global Warming once...of course, I like the phrase "Global Climate Change" better - that way, no matter which way the temperature goes, they're right!

Thanks for the post. Most interesting.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 07:14 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


I'm curious what your specific credentials are? Please don't spin the answer.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 07:34 PM
link   
reply to post by DieterDengler
 

I like science and I read a lot. Done both since for as long as I can remember.
I have no credentials.


[edit on 8/28/2009 by Phage]



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 07:41 PM
link   

Originally posted by ExPostFacto
reply to post by Phage
 


I give you a star for answering my question without hostility. I've noticed a lot of scientific "theories" have exceptions to them. To me an exception to a theory is an indicator that a new theory needs to be made, which involves again speculating at possibilities.


That's what makes a theory... a theory. Hypothesis - the same thing. If a theory doesn't have the possibility of an exception to it, it's not a theory, but I know what you mean.


I agree that speculation holds a very important place in science. Imagine if nobody ever speculated about gravity...



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 07:44 PM
link   
Interesting indeed. I believe most weather, especially in the pacific is cyclical. Living in California I can remember years of terrible storms and years of droughts. Right now we are in a drought...el nino is back which can bring more rain every several years...so maybe will get more rains soon.

The only difference today is that ppl have little memory of such events. If we have a drought, people cry global warming...even though theres been several droughts over the past few decades....when there are floods people again cry man made global climate change...they don't seem to remember the floods of 86' here in northern california...nor do they remember the floods since then...
Every year is worse than the last and nothing like [current weather] has ever happened before, according to them...



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 07:56 PM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
Another example of how complex the engines that drive climate are. A slight increase in solar energy (.1%) could trigger a series of changes that may result in lower sea surface temperatures in the eastern Pacific.


While causing an increase in temperatures in other parts of the world.

Also note how they state, which some people don't seem to understand, and i quote:

At the same time, the increased sunlight at solar maximum causes a slight warming of ocean surface waters, especially across the subtropical Pacific, where Sun-blocking clouds are normally scarce.

That small amount of extra heat leads to more evaporation, producing additional water vapor.
.............
Earths response to the solar cycle continues over the year or two following peak sunspot activity. The La Niña-like pattern triggered by the solar maximum tends to evolve into a pattern similar to El Niño, as slow-moving currents replace the cool water over the eastern tropical Pacific with warmer water.

www.eurekalert.org...



[edit on 28-8-2009 by ElectricUniverse]



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 08:19 PM
link   

Originally posted by Iamonlyhuman

Originally posted by ExPostFacto
reply to post by Phage
 


I agree that speculation holds a very important place in science. Imagine if nobody ever speculated about gravity...


Sometimes it appears on these forums that we jump to conclusions based on known scientific theories, and that shuts the conversation off from speculation. I've noticed the Occam's razor theory used a lot with UFO sightings, and I can't help but get frustrated that we limit speculation based on the simplest explanation for something. It can be assumed that just because the simplest explanation explains something doesn't necessarily make it the only explanation. Why would we assume then that the simple answer is the correct answer when we haven't eliminated the other answers that are more complex?

I agree speculation and exploration of theory is very much a part of science.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 08:30 PM
link   
reply to post by ElectricUniverse
 


It does make me somewhat curious as to how it plays in with other maritime factors that have come into play this year. Namely the lower oxygen zone bringing Humboldt Squids toward the coastline, and the cause& effect role it plays with the other side of the world in the Atlantic ocean. On atlantic side the water has been unusually warm from Virginia up through cape cod, and actually a tad lower in the southern coastal states.

Almost want to e-mail that author and see if it can be applied or tied into their theory.

It may be the effect of El Nino or La Nina weather conditions but the Northeast I have been noticing new wildlife moving in that I have never seen in the area, and I have lived here for 16 years now. Stag beetles, Cicadas (they do occur here normally but they do not appear often, and when they do they always swarm. There have been no swarms but I keep finding single ones pupating, emerging and dying off in the same day!) are appearing all over here, not to mention some rare fungi. I actually found some morals growing on the edge of the lawn near a pine tree, which made for a tasty omelette!



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 08:37 PM
link   
This is a very interesting thread OP


Its interesting to see what everyone is coming up with here. For a long time Ive believed the ENSO has been greatly affrecting the weather across the globe. People were claiming that man made effets had been making the earths weather go haywire, while neglecting to study the effects of the La Nina and El Nino weather patterns, which can greatly increase severity and intensity of certain weather patterns.

Did a thread on it a while back but didnt generate much interest.

Good find



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 11:37 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


Always appreciate the thought and intellect that you put into your replies... Definitely gets my mind thinking for the better...

Interesting how many large scale scientific discovers are occurring lately. Consequently, I've heard our intelligence and technology is increasing at an exponential rate. It will be very exciting to see what the future holds!



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 04:39 AM
link   
Devastated. A while ago whilst researching my Electrical weather thread, I came across an article that discuss' fluctuations in our ionosphere could be what causes the 'currents' in the oceans and rivers, essentially driving the planet. I CANT FIND IT FOR THE LIFE OF ME!

Here's were it was, if your interested in this stuff, check out the links at the bottom of this page, loads of interesting correlations.

www.populartechnology.net...

I did find something interesting though, which is very tenuously linked! lol

An artificial ion cloud that was created as an experiment actually fell in sync with the ionosphere apparently, very interesting.


Abstract

Simultaneous wave processes in the ionosphere and in the artificial ion cloud (AIC) after AIC formation are considered which were recorded by an ionosonde and a multi-frequency Doppler equipment, including a transmitter and receiver. For the first time wave structures in the ionosphere and in the AIC were observed simultaneously. Possible mechanisms of plasma oscillations in the ionosphere and in the AIC are briefly discussed.


Cool!

I'm going to find that link!

EMM

Edit to add: Here is a pdf suggesting that the oceans effect the Ionosphere, I personally think they have their cause and effect mixed up, but hey, each to his own.

www.earth-prints.org...

On a private conspiritorial note, my Electrical Weather thread is nigh on impossible to find on here! doesn't appear on the seacrh! There onto me...



EMM

[edit on 29-8-2009 by ElectroMagnetic Multivers]

[edit on 29-8-2009 by ElectroMagnetic Multivers]

[edit on 29-8-2009 by ElectroMagnetic Multivers]



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 04:56 AM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 29 2009 @ 05:23 AM
link   
Very interestinf thread so far, I will be back to check on it later. Retiring to bed for now.



new topics

top topics



 
16
<<   2 >>

log in

join