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Judge blocks solo sailing trip of 13-year-old

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posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 09:45 AM
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Judge blocks solo sailing trip of 13-year-old


www.rnw.nl

The parents of 13-year-old Laura Dekker who want to allow their daughter to go on a solo sailing trip around the world have been partially stripped of their parental authority.

A judge in Utrecht granted a request by the Child Protection Agency to make the girl a ward of court, effectively blocking Laura's record-breaking attempt. According to the agency it was "irresponsible for such a young girl to make a two-year solo trip around the world".
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 09:45 AM
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This story is causing a lot of debate in te Netherlands. Mostly about whether a trip like this is dangerous for te development of 'a 13-year-old girl'. And without knowing this girl, everybody seems has something to say about this. Most people seem to think of a 13-year-old as a very dependant human being. But this girl is not just a 13-year-old that wakes up one day with a crazy idea:


The 13-year-old is an experienced sailor, like her parents. She has already made solo crossings of the North Sea, to the dismay of the authorities in the English port of Lowestoft, who briefly detained Laura when her father refused to come over and escort her back across the sea on board her yacht, Guppy. Laura takes after her father Dick Dekker, who as a boy aged 12 set sail from IJmuiden harbour, alone in a sailing boat on the North Sea.


For me the debate should be more about whether the goverment is in it's right to intervene. How free are parents when raising their children and deciding what is good for them.

www.rnw.nl
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 10:35 AM
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reply to post by FreezeM
 

I think in this day and age people without a high school education are greatly disadvantaged. If she's graduated from high school I wouldn't have much problem with it, really, but at 13 I doubt she has, so the 2 year duration is a pretty big chunk out of her education.

I would like to see her finish high school or at least get a GED then let her do it.

Apparently the Dutch authorities have similar opinions expressed in their regulations (from OP link):


The case was brought to the attention of the Dutch Youth Care Bureau by a schools inspector, who observed that Laura would be missing school for two years. All Dutch children are obliged by law to attend school until they are 16 years of age. Their parents are required to ensure they are enrolled in school and actually attend classes.


The only problem I have with that is if someone finished high school at 15 then they shouldn't have to worry about going to school until they are 16, but that's probably rare enough to not be much of an issue. Otherwise I agree with that regulation, 2 years is too long.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 10:41 AM
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Well this is really a blow against the theory of population control.


You mean to tell me they actually WANT to keep someone who can spit out more humans?



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 10:54 AM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


Indeed and that seems to be the crux of the issue, the fact she would be missing two years of schooling which is mandatory under law. Also, if the authorities allowed her to miss two years of school to go sailing, then they set a dangerous precendent for anyone else wanting to skip school to do their hobbies, which is essentially what it is.

If the parents want her to go sailing round the world, they should go with her. The authoprities could do little to stop them in that case. I certainly would not be comfortable letting my teenage daughter go sailing AROUND THE WORLD on her own, no matter how competent a sailor she was.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 11:23 AM
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I can really see both sides of the issue here. Part of me wants to side with the girl because it's a dream of hers. I think everyone here would be disppointed if their dreams were... for lack of a better term "close yet far", but at the same time the courts of law find this girl too young to persue it. I hope it gets resolved somehow.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 11:24 AM
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as the parent of a 14 year old girl, i must agree with the judge. even though my daughter is very mature for her age, i still do not even allow her out late at night by herself. honestly, what are these parents thinking? this is a time when a teen needs her parents the most! do not even include the threat of piracy in certain areas of the world. what sort of chance would a young teen have against armed men? too many things could go wrong out on the high seas for one so young.

as to the op. parents do have the right and priviledge to raise children as they see fit. to a point! one must admit that many times, parents do make some very loony decisions that courts have to step in for what is best for the kid. being a parent does not give you a blank check to do what ever you want. this is a case, that i would say would fall under child endangerment.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 11:53 AM
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Wow... The parents and the girl consent, who the #@% hell is the GOVERNMENT to say what's best for people?

Disgusting abuse of Government power ..

While I personally think 13 IS to young to be going sailing around the world alone, I believe the parents and child understand the consequences and are perfectly in their right to make their own decisions.

I can imagine how this is causing some debate in the Netherlands..



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 11:58 AM
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She should go sail away anyway. Once she is in international waters, there's not much that judge can do about it.

Just my 2-cents



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 01:23 PM
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She is not dropping out of school to sail for two years without interruption. She sail part of the trip, then stay in port to study for a while, and then continue her journey. The route she is taking to sail around the world is considered easy by sailing experts.

But rather then going back and forth about arguments proving it is save or dangerous. Let's assume it is dangerous. More dangerous than riding her bike to school on a busy street, for those of you who now Dutch traffic. Even if it is dangerous. Does the government have a right to take parental control away from the parents and 'secure' her to prevent she sails away?



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