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Where does Toothpaste go?

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posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 11:30 PM
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I shall reiterate a prior reply somewhere else.
If it smells like bleach and tastes like bleach, it must be bleach.
In reference to tap water.

Spring water is best.
Distilled water is OK.

Pediatric water, "WITH ADDED FLUORIDE" is F^ and poison.
Nothing like poisoning the children right out of the womb.




posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 11:46 PM
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Originally posted by Scooby Doo
reply to post by HunkaHunka
 


Yes, It is my understanding that it is removed via the processing stage. However, I don't particularly trust tap water, so I stick to bottled waters.


Enjoy your corporate, polluting, overpriced tap water that you already get for nearly free.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 11:52 PM
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Originally posted by brownflyer
reply to post by angrysniper
 


Reverse Osmosis does remove flouride, however it kills your water. It removes most beneficial nutrients as well.

No it doesn't. This is complete wrong.

Remember, "reverse osmosis" is just pressure filtration.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 01:54 AM
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Originally posted by Johnmike
No it doesn't. This is complete wrong.

Remember, "reverse osmosis" is just pressure filtration.



Please read here:

www.pwgazette.com...


It’s true that RO units remove minerals—about 95% of the mineral content anyway—but he isn’t really telling you the whole story. The mineral issue is probably the most controversial question in drinking water purification. Experts on both sides of the issue speak convincingly. My own view, after reading much of the expert opinion, is that the mineral content of water—either high or low—isn’t nearly as important as they would have you believe. That is, minerals in water are inorganic and hard for your body to use. You get most of your minerals from food, which provides organic, easily assimilated minerals. The human body is a sophisticated instrument capable of adapting to a wide range of circumstances and capable of thriving in areas having water of high or low mineral content. As long as water is palatable, it’s within the body’s acceptable range. The main issue with water is chemicals, not minerals. Whether water contains 30 or 3 parts per million calcium isn’t really significant, but the difference between 0.5 and 5 parts per million chloroform is of life or death importance.


answers.yahoo.com...

I also own a high quality TDS Meter and believe me, RO removes most minerals. However as noted above, you can take a good quality suplement or as long as you eat healthy your body can replenish them.



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 01:58 AM
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reply to post by brownflyer
 


I meant about removing fluoride. Sorry for being vague.

[edit on 30-8-2009 by Johnmike]




 
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