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Nobel Peace Prize for climate change, not saving lives or being a hero

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posted on Aug, 27 2009 @ 08:05 PM
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Hey I don't know if this is the right board or not but was wondering how many of yall knew about this. My mom sent it to me recently and I was shocked and dismayed. I couldn't believe this woman who saved sooooooooo many lives wasn't reconized but instead climate change was.



When the Nazis occupying Poland began rounding up Jews in 1940 and sending them to the Warsaw ghetto, Sendler plunged in. With daring and ingenuity, she saved the lives of more than 2,500 Jews, most of them children, a feat that went largely unrecognized until the last years of her life.
She cooperated with the Children's Section of the Municipal Administration, linked with the RGO (Central Welfare Council), a Polish relief organization that was tolerated under German supervision. She organized the smuggling of Jewish children out of the Ghetto, carrying them out in boxes, suitcases and trolleys.[2] Under the pretext of conducting inspections of sanitary conditions during a typhoid outbreak, Sendler visited the Ghetto and smuggled out babies and small children in ambulances and trams, sometimes disguising them as packages.[6] She also used the old courthouse at the edge of the Warsaw Ghetto (still standing) as one of the main routes for smuggling out children.
She buried jars containing their real and assumed names in the garden, so that they could be one day learn the names of their biological families after the war.
In 1943 Sendler was arrested by the Gestapo, severely tortured, and sentenced to death. Żegota saved her by bribing German guards on the way to her execution. She was left in the woods, unconscious and with broken arms and legs.[2] She was listed on public bulletin boards as among those executed. For the remainder of the war, she lived in hiding, but continued her work for the Jewish children. After the war, she dug up the jars containing the children's identities and attempted to find the children and return them to their parents. However, almost all of their parents had been killed at the Treblinka extermination camp or had gone missing otherwise.




For her efforts, Irena Sendler was nominated to the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007. Her nomination was supported by the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW), Polish President Lech Kaczynski and Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert. It might have been the first time a Nobel Prize would be awarded in connection to the Holocaust. However, that didn’t happen.

Instead, the Peace Prize for 2007 went to Al Gore and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

“For their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change.”


www.theclimatescam.com...
www.snopes.com...
en.wikipedia.org...

I am sickened by the world we live in.

[edit on 8/27/2009 by concerned190]

[edit on 8/27/2009 by concerned190]




posted on Aug, 27 2009 @ 08:16 PM
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"The one question every parent asked me was 'Can you guarantee they will live?' We had to admit honestly that we could not, as we did not even know if we would succeed in leaving the ghetto that day. The only guarantee," she said, "was that the children would most likely die if they stayed." Most of the children who left with Sendler's group were taken into Roman Catholic convents, orphanages and homes and given non-Jewish aliases. Sendler recorded their true names on thin rolls of paper in the hope that she could reunite them with their families later. She preserved the precious scraps in jars and buried them in a friend's garden. In 1943, she was captured by the Nazis and tortured but refused to tell her captors who her co-conspirators were or where the bottles were buried.
She also resisted in other ways. According to Felt, when Sendler worked in the prison laundry, she and her co-workers made holes in the German soldiers' underwear. When the officers discovered what they had done, they lined up all the women and shot every other one. It was just one of many close calls for Sendler. During one particularly brutal torture session, her captors broke her feet and legs, and she passed out. When she awoke, a Gestapo officer told her he had accepted a bribe from her comrades in the resistance to help her escape. The officer added her name to a list of executed prisoners. Sendler went into hiding but continued her rescue efforts.

Felt said that Sendler had begun her rescue operation before she joined the organized resistance and helped a number of adults escape, including the man she later married. "We think she saved about 500 people before she joined Zegota," Felt said, which would mean that Sendler ultimately helped rescue about 3,000 Polish Jews.

When the war ended, Sendler unearthed the jars and began trying to return the children to their families. For the vast majority, there was no family left. Many of the children were adopted by Polish families; others were sent to Israel . In 1965, she was recognized by Yad Vashem , Israel 's Holocaust authority, as a Righteous Gentile, an honor given to non-Jews who risked their lives to save Jews during the Nazi reign. In her own country, however, she was unsung.


www.holocaustforgotten.com...



posted on Aug, 27 2009 @ 08:16 PM
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Personally I believe that research should be rewarded by Nobel Prizes in lieu of kind actions, unfortunately. Although that woman saved many lives and showed great bravery, it did not impact many people in every part of the world. It impacted 3,000 people and their families in a tragedy that murdered over 7 million from many different religions, races, and creeds. My grandmother is a Holocaust survivor, she was a teen when she was in multiple ghettos and concentration camps. I think many people are, to this day, afraid to accept the Holocaust as fact and that may have played a part in this decision. However, at this point in 2009, I would feel cheated if that women was awarded a Nobel Prize. She's not the only one who saved lives, and it's possible that there were individuals which saved over 3,000. Therefore, unless she was granted the Prize as a symbol, it would be somewhat... skewed.

But I must remind you that responsible use of resources should be a habit humans have, regardless of climate change. Do I believe we need to be more responsible in many ways to ensure a stable future for our planet, instead of one that is in danger because of something we MAY have done? Yes. But I accept that others do not feel that way.

Yet sustainable agriculture, new technology, carbon reduction, halting a dangerous addiction to a fuel that is not renewable, a stop to deforestation... these are things we need to be doing ANYWAY.

[edit on 8/27/2009 by ravenshadow13]



posted on Aug, 27 2009 @ 08:30 PM
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reply to post by ravenshadow13
 



I agree that we should be more responsible with our actions and what we take from this earth and also what we put back into it. We are too greedy and want it all so we take it all and then all our waste is all we give back. Its crap. And I would be for someone who does auctual research in this area to be awarded a prize but, Al Gore doesn't do research, The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change doesnt either. All they do is publish reports, Well, I can publish reports on how bad we rip the earth of it natural beauty and resources, you could too. We wouldn't get a nobel prize.




The panel was established in 1988 by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), two organizations of the United Nations. The IPCC shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with former Vice President of the United States Al Gore.[3]The panel was established in 1988 by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), two organizations of the United Nations. The IPCC shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with former Vice President of the United States Al Gore.[3]

The IPCC does not carry out research, nor does it monitor climate or related phenomena. A main activity of the IPCC is publishing special reports on topics relevant to the implementation of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 08:49 AM
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Originally posted by ravenshadow13
But I must remind you that responsible use of resources should be a habit humans have, regardless of climate change.
...
Yet sustainable agriculture, new technology, carbon reduction, halting a dangerous addiction to a fuel that is not renewable, a stop to deforestation... these are things we need to be doing ANYWAY.


Too bad that Greenpeace sees stopping deforestation, and re-forestation efforts as threats to its income stream:

"Greenpeace opposes forest preservation"
www.abovetopsecret.com....



posted on Aug, 30 2009 @ 08:57 AM
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reply to post by concerned190
 


Peter Foster of Canada's "National Post" agrees with you, and explains why at great length:

Peter Foster: The man who doubted Al Gore


www.abovetopsecret.com...

network.nationalpost.com...

I agree that actual good works should be recognized over political self-aggrandizement. But, which gets better press and more money flowing? That's the real key to recognition.

jw



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