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I'm Making Medicine with Lemon Balm & 80 Proof Brandy

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posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 11:44 AM
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Based on Books I read recently on the remedial uses for many plants, I'm making a Lemon Balm (Melissa Ofincinalis)Tincture.

A tincture is the most recommended method when long-term storage is wanted. A tincture requires alcohol (a 75% grade) which can be safely ingested.

The process I am following is 4 cups of freshly chopped lemon balm in approximately 1 quart of 80 proof Brandy mixed in a blue tinted canning jar, fingertip sealed. Everyday for the next 2 weeks, I'll shake (or swirl) the jar to loosen the lemon balm mass then replace it the cupboard safely out of the light. Once the saturation period is over, I'll double strain the lemon balm leaves from the liquid.

The brandied lemon balm is now ready for self-experimentation. I have faith so I'm not overly worried about any harmful side effects. If there are any, I'll update this post on the event I live through it.


My intention is to discover for myself whether or not the books I've read are sharing real, valuable, true information that can be safely put to practical use.

I intend to take 1 teaspoon per day for up to 3 days to document its effects on my body. If, after 3 days, I notice any change in my body's responses, I will proceed from those results.

It has been said that Lemon Balm has been used successfully for a very long time. Uses have included the treatment of chest congestion, coughs, mild cases of the influenza as it induces perspiration...excellent for mild fevers. It once had the reputation as a mild stimulant for cardiac conditions.

I started the tincture on August 15, 2009.

I'm excited because if the results I achieve are anywhere near the mark, I may never buy tylenol or cough medicine again.
And not relying on strangers to care for my welfare is who I truly am as a person. I don't trust big-pharma. Natural remedies that I make myself are guaranteed to be effective, pure and safe with no additives or preservatives that cant be pronounced by the common person.

Not only that, but I'll have developed the confidence I need to experiment further with other herbs and flowers. Marigolds are next. There may be a good reason why gold is in its name.




posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 11:55 AM
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Tell me if you come up with something for headaches I'm a frequent sufferer. Also I shake for lack of a better word sometimes and it bothers me alot.

[edit on 10-04-08 by Beach Bum]



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 12:02 PM
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Originally posted by Beach Bum
Tell me if you come up with something for headaches I'm a frequent sufferer.


I've had some really bad headaches and would only get worse with aspirin. About 6 months ago, I was also having heartburn and took about a half teaspoon of baking soda in a coffee cup and about 20 mintutes later, the headache was gone. Do a search on all of your symptoms, which might be related to molds etc.

[edit on 26-8-2009 by aleon1018]

Also look into salicylate sensitivity

salicylatesensitivity.com...

.........And celiac disease

www.csaceliacs.org...

[edit on 26-8-2009 by aleon1018]



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 12:10 PM
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I've never brewed my own but Melissa O is real medicine.

It's very good for cold sores, probably better than anything topical but you'd have to figure out how to make a cream. Taken internally it mellows me out and I use it combined with a few other herbs to help sleep sometimes so be careful at first. Maybe take it in the evening. Individual effects and mileage vary.

Lastly good luck! Nature has provided many gifts that big pharma doesn't want you to know about.



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by Hazelnut
 


I've been taking 1000 mg of ester C for about a month and have noticed an improvement. I've read how oils can be more benefical as well. I wonder if housewives who've used lemon products such as Lemon Pledge had any benefits? I've bought tinctures before, but didn't use them very long.



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 12:35 PM
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Why not use PGA? It's cheaper, and it is the base for a great many cough meds that contain alcohol. It can also be used on wounds, if necessary, and it would be a shame to waste good brandy or whiskey by pouring it on a wound.



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by Hazelnut
 


Wow Hazel, we are on exactly the same page on the same day!

I just left my house, instructing my wife and mother to collect some local honey (Tupelo) and some Natural Cinnamon, so I could prepare a medicine this evening. I will be using Bacardi 151 (or Moonshine if I can find it), along with Honey, Cinnamon, and Mint!

Great Thread! I look forward to reading through it.

PS. 80 Proof is only 40% alcohol. I don't know if the 75% was a hard requirement for your recipe, but you will need at least 150 proof to have 75% alcohol.

Edit to add: Thumbs up for the Marigolds!
We are using these around our garden to repel pests, and they have many other uses!

[edit on 26-8-2009 by getreadyalready]



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 01:26 PM
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Originally posted by kettlebellysmith
Why not use PGA? It's cheaper, and it is the base for a great many cough meds that contain alcohol. It can also be used on wounds, if necessary, and it would be a shame to waste good brandy or whiskey by pouring it on a wound.


What is PGA? I've never heard of it.

I'm new at this and still learning.



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 01:29 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by Hazelnut
 


Wow Hazel, we are on exactly the same page on the same day!

I just left my house, instructing my wife and mother to collect some local honey (Tupelo) and some Natural Cinnamon, so I could prepare a medicine this evening. I will be using Bacardi 151 (or Moonshine if I can find it), along with Honey, Cinnamon, and Mint!

Great Thread! I look forward to reading through it.

PS. 80 Proof is only 40% alcohol. I don't know if the 75% was a hard requirement for your recipe, but you will need at least 150 proof to have 75% alcohol.

Edit to add: Thumbs up for the Marigolds!
We are using these around our garden to repel pests, and they have many other uses!

[edit on 26-8-2009 by getreadyalready]


That's amazing. I knew there would be people who could add knowledge to this thread. Thank you. What are you making with the cinnamon, honey and mint? A cold remedy?

And thanks for the info on the alcohol. I guess I didn't do it right. Oh well, I can always try again. Do you think the one I started should be discarded since the alcohol content is much lower than the recommendation?



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 02:54 PM
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reply to post by Hazelnut
 


I think the 80 proof will be just fine for ingesting. Anything above 30 proof will resist bacterial growth and remain stable and sterile for a very long time. Of course, the higher the better, and if you are applying this to an open wound, I would probably go ahead and get the 75% (150 proof) or higher to be certain no sugars remain to harbor bacteria.

The one I am making is for a daily maintenance dose during the upcoming flu fiasco! A shot with each meal. It is a personal recipe compiled from my Mother and Grandmother's advice over the years and a lot of research on Honey and Cinnamon. My entire extended family has agreed to forego the vaccinations and Tamiflu regimen as long as I can keep them healthy holistically.

The Honey and Alcohol have anti-bacterial properties. The Cinnamon has many properties, including some digestive help and stomach settling. The mint also helps to calm a nervous stomach, and it cuts the bite of the alcohol a little!


To treat the flu, if any of us get it, I ordered some Sublingual Germanium, Liquid Colloidal Silver, MMS, Vitamin D, and Vitamin C. I have also advised them all to get as much sun as possible here in the late summer to build up their body's reserve of Vitamin D.



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 03:07 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Good. Then I'll keep working on the one I started. But for open wounds, I have a supply of sage growing in the garden and hopefully I'll be able to transplant some indoors for the winter.



The versatile sage can be used for bringing in quick relief from a variety of ailments, both minor and major. For example, to gain immediate relief from itching and swelling accompanying insect bites, a few fresh sage leaves can be plucked, and then crushed or even chewed. When mixed with a little saliva, the sage leaves can make an excellent poultice, albeit crude and wet. This can then be applied to the affected area, and secured in place with the help of common adhesive tape.


I love learning about the medicinal properties of common herbs, flowers and weeds. It makes me feel like I'm being let in on some huge secret. LOL



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 05:07 PM
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I picked up a copy of Jethro Kloss' Back to Eden 20 years ago or so and it's what got me started with natural remedies and I haven't looked back. You have to take some of it with a grain of salt (yuk) but it's an interesting read on top of be informational. If you want to learn more it will get you thinking.

www.living-foods.com...



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 05:13 PM
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reply to post by beezwaxes
 


I am grateful for the link you gave. I'll probably buy the original, unedited version of his book, Back to Eden just because I'd like to see for myself what his take was before the edits.



Kloss was an integral part of some of the major nutritional advances in US governmental food regulations in the 1930's, ie, requiring that depleted processed breads and flours be enriched and fortified.



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 08:28 PM
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No problem. When I bought mine I sent my dad a copy too and he wasn't the type to be interested in things like that. I was trying to give him a hint (he wasn't the kind to listen to advice either). Anyway he told me he thought it was a joke at first but read it and really liked it.

JK & co. seem to have done some miraculous things. I for one believe them for the most part. Not because I feel the herbs ect. performed miracles but because they helped and Kloss basically told the patients it was possible and ok to heal. The body is an amazing piece of work.



posted on Aug, 27 2009 @ 11:36 AM
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reply to post by Hazelnut
 
PGA=pure grain acohol. It's as close to 100% drinking alcohol as you can get. You can buy it at any liquor store.
PGA is a staple of a great many college parties. Dump a pint in a gallon or two of punch and party all night.



posted on Aug, 27 2009 @ 11:39 AM
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reply to post by kettlebellysmith
 


Lordy I can be so dumb. LOL

PGA, all I could think of was the golf thingy but I knew you didn't mean that.


My husband has some moonshine but he wouldn't let me use it.


Besides, I want the medicine to be palatable. PGA is nastay.



posted on Aug, 27 2009 @ 11:55 AM
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reply to post by Beach Bum
 


Try focusing on the right side of your brain and tell me how you feel, just the right hemisphere put your attention their and tell me what happens.,



posted on Aug, 27 2009 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by kettlebellysmith
Why not use PGA? It's cheaper, and it is the base for a great many cough meds that contain alcohol. It can also be used on wounds, if necessary, and it would be a shame to waste good brandy or whiskey by pouring it on a wound.


Actually, one should research the herb that they're making into a tincture before going through with it. Some herbs require a certain amount of alcohol to bring out desired properties. I usually use PGA because it's easy to dilute if too much alcohol would kill off the effects I'm going after or would give me another aspect of the plant's usefulness (I'd give an example, but I'm not at home, so I don't have my herbal handy.) There are yet others that can be obtained through the same process but with either water (like a sun tea, only very, very strong) or distilled (white) vinegar. In any case, it's pretty well acceptable to use a brandy, vodka, or whiskey if you want the tincture to not taste quite so much like medicine. Though, I must admit, I'm more partial to tea/tisane/decoctions - there's something comforting in drinking tea for wellness rather than measuring out medicine.


I've been involved with herbal medicine since I was a teen (my grandma was an herbalist.) I'm about to start school soon so that I can practice naturopathy (including herbalist and homeopathic medicine), since I've already got a firm grounding in it. I can give fairly good recommendations for just about anything, at this point!



posted on Aug, 27 2009 @ 12:10 PM
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Originally posted by Hazelnut
reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Good. Then I'll keep working on the one I started. But for open wounds, I have a supply of sage growing in the garden and hopefully I'll be able to transplant some indoors for the winter.

I love learning about the medicinal properties of common herbs, flowers and weeds. It makes me feel like I'm being let in on some huge secret. LOL


Keep some honey on hand, too! It's great both as a natural sweetener for your medicines as well as being antiseptic and antifungal all on its own! I use it where most folks would use neosporine, and I've never gotten a scar (and I've wounded myself something fierce before!)



posted on Aug, 27 2009 @ 12:27 PM
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reply to post by ladyofapples
 


I didn't know that honey was an antiseptic. Next time I cut myself I'm going to try it. Since I'm a huge clutz, it shouldn't be long.

I make tisanes of rosemary and mint but I'm the only one who drinks them. Also I have a huge supply of dried herbs that I grew in my garden. But I'm hesitant with them because I'm not sure of my methods just yet.

I'm excited for you having the opportunity to pursue your education in the field of Naturopathy. If I could go back to school, that's what I would do.







 
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