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Bee genome gives killer clue to colony collapse disorder

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posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 11:07 AM
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Bee genome gives killer clue to colony collapse disorder


www.news cientist.com

The team found 65 genes that were distinctly different in CCD bees. They also discovered unusual snippets of genetic material that are typical of infection with the RNA viruses known as picorna-like viruses. They found no evidence to suggest that pesticides or bacterial infection are the primary cause of CCD. Berenbaum thinks picorna-like viruses may be the root cause, making the bees highly vulnerable to other viruses, pesticides and bacteria.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 11:07 AM
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Wow, scary stuff. I had never herd of 'picorna-like viruses' before.

Here is a link to the wiki definition of picornavirus.

en.wikipedia.org...

Basically these bees, or those colonies, have a genetic deficiency that prevents them from being able to deal with viruses effectively.

This is scary because this may be an issue we can not help to resolve, which would be devastating to planetary diversity and health as the honey bee acts as a keystone species.

Hopefully something can be worked out where we are actively replacing these compromised colonies with healthy colonies preventing widespread collapse.

www.news cientist.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 11:40 AM
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Looking at the link to the picornavirus you supplied, I was surprised to see that the rhinovirus (common cold) is classified as a picornavirus as well. We've had a lot of success battling that one


I also noticed something I found extremely interesting, but I would like someone with greater knowledge in the medical/pharmaceutical field to help me with this: In the table listing picornavirii types, under Genus: Enterovirus; Species: Human enterovirus B, I see this description (emphasis mine for clarity):

57 types including enteroviruses, coxsackie B viruses, echoviruses, and swine vesicular disease virus
Source: en.wikipedia.org...

My question: is this swine vesticular disease virus related in any way to the recently-infamous (but decidedly undeadly to date) Swine Flu?

Just curious...

TheRedneck



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 11:45 AM
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It's funny, You just don't see much, if anything about the possible connection between CDC and the heavy increase of GM crops.


Do you think the bees know that the plants they're jumping to and from are genetically modified?... I bet they know something just isn't right.

I'm no scientist, but I can't imagine that having all those GM crops has zero effect on the bees, and the corporations not giving a rats a@@.



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 11:57 AM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
Looking at the link to the picornavirus you supplied, I was surprised to see that the rhinovirus (common cold) is classified as a picornavirus as well. We've had a lot of success battling that one



actually the common cold is CAUSED by the picornavirus it is not the actual picornavirus itself.



Picornaviruses are separated into nine distinct genera and include many important pathogens of humans and animals.[1] The diseases they cause are varied, ranging from acute "common-cold"-like illnesses, to poliomyelitis, to chronic infections in livestock. Two main categories are enteroviruses and rhinoviruses.


The statement was not well written so I can see where confusion would easily arise.




I also noticed something I found extremely interesting, but I would like someone with greater knowledge in the medical/pharmaceutical field to help me with this: In the table listing picornavirii types, under Genus: Enterovirus; Species: Human enterovirus B, I see this description (emphasis mine for clarity):

57 types including enteroviruses, coxsackie B viruses, echoviruses, and swine vesicular disease virus
Source: en.wikipedia.org...

My question: is this swine vesticular disease virus related in any way to the recently-infamous (but decidedly undeadly to date) Swine Flu?

Just curious...

TheRedneck


Wow very good observation and question! I hope someone can supply the answer. Perhaps we are going the way of the bees soon too!



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 12:18 PM
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Interesting... it sounds like a version of AIDs



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by Animal

actually the common cold is CAUSED by the picornavirus it is not the actual picornavirus itself.

OK, that clears things up some... not....


I'll bow to your knowledge, though. As I have stated many times, my extent of medical science training is barely more than quite a few chemistry courses, a lot of reading, and some personal observations. I'm more comfortable working with machinery. Blood is messier than oil, IMHO.


Thank you for a great thread! I have been hearing about the problem with the bees (although I must admit, they are still going strong here), and wondering what could be causing the problem. That little tidbit about swine vesticular disease caught my eye, as everything I have read about this swine flu leads me to wonder if it wasn't manufactured somewhere. (No, I have no 'proof' of that as of yet, just a hunch.) But if it were manufactured, wouldn't it make sense that the final product is the result of at least a few mistakes? What did they do with these mistakes?

OK, I'm getting a bit too paranoid on this. I'll just shut up on the swine flu thing and wait for an informed answer like a good little redneck.


TheRedneck



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 10:35 PM
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"bump"

I'd really like an answer to my question...

Anyone...?

TheRedneck



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 10:54 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


I don't know swine flu, but I do know bees. Back when I made my thread (Honeybees, HIV, and You) a few people asked me whether they thought whatever was causing the honeybee decline was manmade. I said no. Because the decline of bees, while creating more hand pollination and pollination machine invention jobs, could seriously threaten our supply of important things like food. And cotton.

I also thought back when I made that thread that the problem stemmed from an immune issue linked to a virus, not a specific fungus or issue with vibrations as suggested. I think that, and Animal you can correct me, that this alteration of the genome by this virus is almost exactly what I predicted in my thread.

I'm a tad proud. A tad.



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 10:58 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 





My question: is this swine vesticular disease virus related in any way to the recently-infamous (but decidedly undeadly to date) Swine Flu?


Hi Redneck,

The swine vesticular disease in an Enterovirus which is not related to the Swine Flu H1N1 which is an Influenza A and influenza A virus is a genus of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses. Influenza A H1N1 sort of made the jump from a bird virus as I recall.

Hope that helps.



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 10:59 PM
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reply to post by ravenshadow13

I'm a tad proud. A tad.

It would seem that congratulations and condolences are both in order.

Tell me, do you still believe the cause is not man-made, in light of this new information? And do you know if the swine vesticular disease virus mentioned in the Wiki link above is related to the infamous swine flu virus?

TheRedneck



posted on Aug, 27 2009 @ 01:25 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Redneck:

Swine vesicular disease

Virus Family Picornaviridae
Genus Enterovirus

link

› Viruses
› ssRNA viruses
› ssRNA positive-strand viruses, no DNA stage
› Picornavirales
› Picornaviridae
› Enterovirus
› Human enterovirus B
› Swine vesicular disease virus
link



Swine Flu H1N1

Virus Family Orthomyxoviridae
Genus Influenzavirus A

link

link

› Viruses
› ssRNA viruses
› ssRNA negative-strand viruses
› Orthomyxoviridae
› Influenzavirus A
› Influenza A virus
› H1N1 subtype
link

So to answer your question, no. Based on taxonomic organization they diverge from one another early on. While all viruses are of the same class they diverge rapidly and diversely from this point on.


[edit on 27-8-2009 by Animal]



posted on Aug, 27 2009 @ 01:42 PM
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Animal and plumranch:

Thank you, that does indeed answer my question and place my mind at ease a bit. They say a little knowledge can be a dangerous thing, and in this case, it could have put me on a wild goose chase.

I have one thing to say in defense of my jumping to conclusions: it's not really paranoia if they're really out to get you!


Thanks again!

TheRedneck



posted on Aug, 27 2009 @ 02:12 PM
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Originally posted by Animal

Bee genome gives killer clue to colony collapse disorder


www.news cientist.com

The team found 65 genes that were distinctly different in CCD bees. They also discovered unusual snippets of genetic material that are typical of infection with the RNA viruses known as picorna-like viruses. They found no evidence to suggest that pesticides or bacterial infection are the primary cause of CCD. Berenbaum thinks picorna-like viruses may be the root cause, making the bees highly vulnerable to other viruses, pesticides and bacteria.
(visit the link for the full news article)



Someone mentioned to me that it partly is the cell phone frequencies causing the bees to lose their way, and not be able to tell the rest of the hive where the pollen sources were. Now that would be a bit of a crimp in people's lives, if true. That means WE are killing the bees with our constant blabbing, eh? I don't have a reference for it though, but it does seem plausible enough, to me.


[edit on 27-8-2009 by DragonriderGal]



posted on Aug, 27 2009 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by Animal
 





he team found 65 genes that were distinctly different in CCD bees. They also discovered unusual snippets of genetic material that are typical of infection with the RNA viruses known as picorna-like viruses. They found no evidence to suggest that pesticides or bacterial infection are the primary cause of CCD. Berenbaum thinks picorna-like viruses may be the root cause, making the bees highly vulnerable to other viruses, pesticides and bacteria.


Just wanted to repeat what the scientists found.

Affected bees had their genetic material changed and there was evidence suggesting RNA viruses were involved.

This is only the smoking gun. They have a lot more research to do before nailing the diagnosis so to speak.

All the other causes of bee death have not panned out like cell phones, radiation, climate change and on and on.

The wild colony of bees on my ranch died out this year, I'm sad about that but I still see tons of bees around to pollinate so that's the good news.

I assume that since there are still bees around the survivors will develope resistance and bees will make a comeback. I just hope they are nice bees when they do and not the mean variety!


BTW, bee diseases have been around as long as there have been bees. This is simply an new disease involving their immune systems, apparently.



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