It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Beautiful picture of The Aurora Borealis and the Aurora Australis from space.

page: 1
9

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 06:37 AM
link   
This an old but beautifull picture taken by an Astronaut named Donald R. Petty.
Just thought I'd share this rare and breathtaking sight with all of you.





" The Aurora Borealis and the Manicouagan Impact Crater reservoir in Quebec, Canada, are seen in this photo taken by astronaut Donald R. Pettit, Expedition Six NASA ISS science officer, on board the International Space station in January 2003 "


[edit on 06/10/2009 by jinx880101]




posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 06:54 AM
link   
Mother earth is beautiful.



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 07:20 AM
link   
reply to post by A por uvas
 


She is indeed! If you look closely, you can see the definite line of the earths atmosphere. Absolutely stunning. I'm glad I live here.



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 07:31 AM
link   
That is a cool pic indeed.

Quick question, what is the deal with the circular cloud formation? tia



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 07:38 AM
link   
reply to post by earth2
 


Nice vision! I have no idea, yesterday we had three cloud formations here that looked just like tornados in the sky. I didnt have my phone or camera with me coz we were just driving to the 7/11. Darn it, I wish I had pics.



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 07:55 AM
link   
That's the shockwave of a supernova. Soran did it!



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 08:08 AM
link   
reply to post by earth2
 


i too would love to know what the circle is, it must be quite large.

snoopyuk



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 08:09 AM
link   
Isn't that circular formation the crater at which the photo was taken?

"The Aurora Borealis and the Manicouagan Impact Crater reservoir in Quebec, Canada, are seen in this photo taken by astronaut Donald R. Pettit, Expedition Six NASA ISS science officer, on board the International Space station in January 2003 "

I sure hope so. But, images are stunning.



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 08:17 AM
link   
reply to post by havok
 


You are so correct.

Cant believe I didnt read the instructions, lol.

Wow, that impact crater is just as awesome. Must have been a scary scene on Earth that day.



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 08:18 AM
link   
reply to post by havok
 

This is a picture of the said crater. So, I dont know if it could be the same thing. I suppose it is.



The Manicouagan Crater in northern Canada is one of the oldest impact craters known. Formed during a surely tremendous impact about 200 million years ago, the present day terrain supports a 70-kilometer diameter hydroelectric reservoir in the telltale form of an annular lake. The crater itself has been worn away by the passing of glaciers and other erosional processes. Still, the hard rock at the impact site has preserved much of the complex impact structure and so allows scientists a leading case to help understand large impact features on Earth and other Solar System bodies. Also visible above is the vertical fin of the Space Shuttle Columbia from which the picture was taken in 1983.




[edit on 06/10/2009 by jinx880101]



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 08:21 AM
link   
The photo is amazing, thank you for sharing.


In this video you can hear Science Officer Don Pettit describe his observation of the Aurora Borealis:



And this is a beautiful time lapse video of Aurora Borealis captured from the ISS. (One image taken every 15 seconds and played back at 5 frames per image.)




posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 09:36 AM
link   
reply to post by ziggystar60
 


The second timelaps vid is amazing, thank you so much for posting it here!The change in color is magnificent, way better than the first pic posted. Star! Love the avatar be the way. Its awsome that we have the privlidge to be living in a time where we have the technology to capture such amazing visuals!

[edit on 06/10/2009 by jinx880101]



posted on Aug, 26 2009 @ 05:54 PM
link   

Originally posted by jinx880101
reply to post by havok
 

This is a picture of the said crater. So, I dont know if it could be the same thing. I suppose it is.



The Manicouagan Crater in northern Canada is one of the oldest impact craters known. Formed during a surely tremendous impact about 200 million years ago, the present day terrain supports a 70-kilometer diameter hydroelectric reservoir in the telltale form of an annular lake. The crater itself has been worn away by the passing of glaciers and other erosional processes. Still, the hard rock at the impact site has preserved much of the complex impact structure and so allows scientists a leading case to help understand large impact features on Earth and other Solar System bodies. Also visible above is the vertical fin of the Space Shuttle Columbia from which the picture was taken in 1983.




[edit on 06/10/2009 by jinx880101]


I hope a photo expert can tell us how they got the depth of field so in focus. The fin of the shuttle is in perfect focus and the earth is also in focus. This is the kind of thing Ansel Adams was good at. I could never quite get everything to line up. Beautiful pics though. I spent some time in northern Minnesota and was able to see the northern lights in person. It really makes you feel closer to God. I will never forget it.



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 08:31 AM
link   
This is truly amaizing never seen it before . Thank you !



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 08:47 AM
link   
My dad is from minnessota and my favorite thing he used to talk about was Aurora Borealis, Hence my oldest daughters name Aurora.



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 08:51 AM
link   

Originally posted by network dude
I hope a photo expert can tell us how they got the depth of field so in focus. The fin of the shuttle is in perfect focus and the earth is also in focus.


It's easy. You get a lot of depth with small aperture in your lens. This follows from optics -- the principle is similar to pinhole camera.



new topics

top topics



 
9

log in

join