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Very unusual holes/openings/entrances found in Antartica

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posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 01:40 AM
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God... just look it up actually, there is another one just to the east of it, it is obsiously just a hole with ice on it. Just because it looks strange doesn't mean its anything special, there are hundreds of those there was bound to be one that looks manmade




posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 09:15 AM
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Check out these cordinates, just noticed that there seems to be another whole with something in it. It's blurry on my computer (not great graphics card) but the rocks around it are not so blury? Why is this? Can anyone get a better pic? I can't figure out how to take a pic and upload it? Maybe someone with better graphics card can upload it.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 09:25 AM
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Found another wierd thing. Looks sort of like a frozen lake. Rotate it and it looks out of place with surrounding. I wonder what the topography is like. Is it on side of mountain or flat ground. hmmmm. well, the cordinates are:
66°33'59.84"S
99°49'44.19"E

Maybe someone with good graphics card can upload pic.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 09:27 AM
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Originally posted by likeabull
Check out these cordinates, just noticed that there seems to be another whole with something in it. It's blurry on my computer (not great graphics card) but the rocks around it are not so blury? Why is this? Can anyone get a better pic? I can't figure out how to take a pic and upload it? Maybe someone with better graphics card can upload it.


I'll take a look but will need the coordinates, please !



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 09:33 AM
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Found another Hole with same trail leaving it; like the ice had melted and then became frozen again. Might want to rotate on this one too, a little hard to see.
66°33'53.22"S
99°49'51.92"E



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 11:02 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by VitriolAndAngst
 

I didn't flatten anything out. I used the horizon tilt feature of Google Earth.
If you look at the whole picture I posted ( right click>view image), you'll see that the source of the shadow is a low curved hill (snow drift)? To the right of the pond.

This is not a glacier. Glaciers do not occur in the middle of a rocky area (well, I guess a very small one could). The holes in glaciers which are created by water, do not extend into the rock beneath the glacier. This entire area is on a gentle slope.

Please view the location in Google Earth, you'll get a much better idea of what you are looking at.


[edit on 8/26/2009 by Phage]


Seriously?

When you tilt on google maps -- all it does if flatten things out with perspective -- just like photoshop. YOU DON'T LOOK at a different angle. So, you are corroborating my point that you flipped and flattened the photo. If we had a few more perspectives to view it -- then we COULD create a 3D image. However, Google Maps just stamps a satellite photo from a survey and uses a flat global mapping routine to make it look dimensional. In some places, they do show perspective -- but that's only when someone uploaded some geometry for a building. No elevation data is present as far as I know on Google maps -- certainly not for structures that are 90 feet.

If it's a snow drift, then it would have a lighter side to the mound that angled towards the sun.

I do graphics work all day long -- it looks like a hole to me.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 11:04 AM
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All of you folks -- STOP rotating google maps.

It doesn't have any topography -- it has the illusion of 3D, but it's just a photo taken from the sky. The shadows and everything else are frozen from the last photo.

You MIGHT want to grab some earlier image -- sometimes you can extrapolate from the shadows in two pictures.

But most of you have the wrong idea about this mapping data. Sheesh.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 11:12 AM
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reply to post by VitriolAndAngst
 


Very true!!!!
Google Earth has no intrinsic Elevation Data.
We need to see if there is a DEM (Digital Elevation Map) for these areas, and then, only then, will we see if there is any elevation.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 11:43 AM
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Here are the cordinates of the things I found:
The first one I think I forgot to post cordinates. Looks like something inside the hole.

66°33'41.99"S
99°50'34.07"E

66°33'59.84"S
99°49'44.19"E

66°33'53.70"S
99°49'50.23"E



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 12:00 PM
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ok let me start by saying this...if the U.S. govn. was going to launch any sort of secret miltary operation..where is the place where nobody lives, next to no satellites see, and is completely obscured by inclimate weather. better yet, if any sort of alien race was to try and live on the planet, wouldnt they try to remain obscure and unnoticed? this are only 2 obvious situations..but if you look at the picture with the metallic shelfing over it how can you remotely say its natural? its blatantly there this was built.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 12:02 PM
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i think its pretty obvious that there is a metallic shelf over one of the pictures, almost like a dome over the opening? can nobody else see this is completely man-made?



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 12:11 PM
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Disclaimer: As elsewhere!


Explanation: RE: Tilting in GE shows no elevation!

Then please explain these screen captures from GE with titlted horizons clearly showing elevation!








Personal Disclosure: I agree that Tilted GE only shows an approximation of elevation but its pronounced enough to get a rough idea/estimate especially when also utilizing the elevation meter that I mentioned previously!
The addition of an independantly sourced Antarctic DEM would help, but only if its map was resolved to a high level of accuracy! [say each elevation pixel represented visually is 1mtr^2 of real mapped terrain!]



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 12:11 PM
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Actually; In Direct3D mode Google Earth does have some elevation data, it's no illusion. Just look at the Appalachian and Rocky Mountains.


[edit on 8/28/2009 by eNumbra]



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by VitriolAndAngst
 

Google Earth does incorporate DEM (digital elevation model) data in it's "terrain" mode. But the resolution of the model does vary according to the available data. The data for this area shows only a steady slope upward the east, indicating that the data may not be very high resolution. In a way, my point in showing the "tilted" view was to demonstrate exactly what you are saying. (I misunderstood when you said I applied perspective). From an overhead image it is impossible to judge elevation without additional data. The dark area could be a hole or it could be a flat surface.



We have other clues though. We have descriptions of the terrain of the Bunger Hills (about 30km away) as typically;

an area of rocky hills not covered by snow or ice, about 20 km across.
questacon.typepad.com...

Images of Bunger Hills taken at ground level seem to be very similar to the satellite images of this region.

We also know that:

The Bunger Hills are marked by numerous melt ponds
en.wikipedia.org...
We can see these melt ponds in Google Earth and we can see that they bear a strong resemblance to the feature in question.

You mention shadows. Indeed eastern side of the snow drift to the east of the pool is lighter than the western side.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 12:20 PM
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Originally posted by likeabull
Found another wierd thing. Looks sort of like a frozen lake. Rotate it and it looks out of place with surrounding. I wonder what the topography is like. Is it on side of mountain or flat ground. hmmmm. well, the cordinates are:
66°33'59.84"S
99°49'44.19"E

Maybe someone with good graphics card can upload pic.


Have looked at those areas, found this:

66°33'59.84"S, 99°49'44.19"E


66°33'53.22"S, 99°49'51.92"E



These what you are talking about?



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 12:44 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Interesting!!!



In order to incorporate your DEM terrain data with the imagery and vector data displayed in Google Earth you'll need to have the Enterprise version. To learn more check out:


Google Earth Enterprise Version

So Google Earth only uses Imagery and vector data



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 12:57 PM
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Dont forget to check this one out. looks kinda of like to objects in a hole. Perhaps you can post it. You can see alot more with your computer. You must have high octane computer.

66°33'41.99"S
99°50'34.07"E



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 01:13 PM
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reply to post by likeabull
 


Your other site: 66°33'41.99"S, 99°50'34.07"E



A closer view:



As we can see, it is intentionally blurred out!!!



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 01:25 PM
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Do you guys realise that there are virtually hundreds of scientific teams from all over the world out there?
They have been there for quite sometime! Now imagine that you have a solid structure; this sturcture has been in place for lets say five years at a minimum. Now factor in the weather and snow fall. WHAT are you going to see other than a door? A road way of sorts leading to it? and guess what else? NO building can now be seen because the whole thing is covered in ice/snow.
Look around to some of the sites of known and available pictures of scientific outposts you will see the same thing at the ones that have been in place for at least a few years. They LOOK like holes in the ice or snow layers.
Another thing to consider is that some of the people out there are VERY secritive of what they are studying.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 01:31 PM
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Originally posted by starwarp2000

So Google Earth only uses Imagery and vector data


Why didn't you post the question that was being answered (or provide a link to your source)?

I have my own 3D DTM/DEM files.
IS IT POSSIBLE TO DO THIS PROCESS OR NOT.

groups.google.com...


That is talking about applying your own DEM. You cannot do that with the free version but you can with the Enterprise version.

The free version of Google Earth includes publicly available (some may be commercial) DEMs.

What does this mean? This means when you tilt your view in Google Earth while looking at the new data (using your middle mouse button, the slider in the top right, or your SpaceNavigator), you are seeing terrain features which more closely resemble reality. Also, since the terrain is more accurate, the satellite/aerial photos taken from above stretches over the terrain more accurately. This means the scenery looks much better.

www.gearthblog.com...

[edit on 8/28/2009 by Phage]



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