It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

People along East Coast may see shuttle launch tonight

page: 1
5

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 09:29 PM
link   
www.msnbc.msn.com...

People along East Coast may see shuttle launch
Discovery’s planned liftoff could be final chance see launch at night

People in the eastern United States will get a great opportunity, weather permitting, to see the space shuttle Discovery launched into orbit early Tuesday morning. And it might also be the final opportunity ever to see a nighttime shuttle launch.





posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 09:33 PM
link   
I live about 20 minutes from Cape Canaveral, and I gotta say, the shuttle launch isnt really all that its cracked up to be. Even when you are at the Cape watching it, you are too far away to see anything except a bright light and smoke.

The really cool thing is when it comes back to Earth. The last time it came in, it was strapped to the back of a huge jet, and came RIGHT over my house, so low I swear I could of thrown a baseball and hit it. I heard 2 very loud sonic booms, and thought a bomb had gone off in my backyard...I ran outside and looked around and this gigantic contraption came right over my house and turned north, right to the Cape. Now, that was cool....



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 09:53 PM
link   
AWWWHH MANNNN I LIVE 20 KM FROM VIEW SIGHT!



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 09:57 PM
link   
Cool, I betcha were gonna get alot of UFO sightings tonight



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 10:03 PM
link   
I live in LaBelle, Fl so I will be watching...awesome, night launches are cool.
This will be my second one.

NASA TV



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 10:05 PM
link   
What time is the shuttle supposed to be launched? I live in southwestCT.



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 10:06 PM
link   
reply to post by Pauligirl
 


I'm right on the edge of the limit of visibility for main engine cutoff. I really doubt that I'll be able to see it, but I'll go out and watch, just in case! I'm an avid sky watcher anyway and this would be great to see! Thanks for posting this... I hadn't heard about it.



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 10:06 PM
link   
reply to post by Pauligirl
 


The shuttle was visible after take off , over Ireland last July complete with accompanying orange glow from the detached booster tank. This was something only visible once before over Ireland, in the last 28 years .

Looks like i`m out of luck with this launch.



Edit: Apparently i will be able to witness the " space chase " between Discovery and the ISS.
Any body know off hand , how soon after launch , such a manoeuvre takes place ?


[edit on 24-8-2009 by UmbraSumus]



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 10:10 PM
link   

Originally posted by ziggy1706
What time is the shuttle supposed to be launched? I live in southwestCT.



1:36:05 AM ET if all goes well.



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 10:12 PM
link   
reply to post by ziggy1706
 


1:36 am est

God Speed

oops someone already said...anyway here is some more iupdated info

------------------------------------------------

Mon, 24 Aug 2009 10:22:29 PM EDT

The crew of STS-128 is taking their assigned seats inside the shuttle tonight in preparation for launch at 1:36 a.m. EDT. A team of specialists is helping the astronauts as they climb into place. Commander Rick “C.J.” Sturckow was first inside the orbiter, taking the seat in the front of the flight deck in the left-hand seat. Three more astronauts will join him on the flight deck and the three other members of the crew will sit on the lower level of the shuttle, called the middeck.


[edit on 24-8-2009 by earth2]



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 10:41 PM
link   
www.msnbc.msn.com...


Where to look

* Southeast U.S. coastline: Anywhere north of Cape Canaveral, viewers should initially concentrate on the south-southwest horizon. If you are south of the Cape, look low toward the north-northeast. If you're west of the Cape, look low toward the east-northeast.
* Mid-Atlantic region: Look toward the south about 3 to 6 minutes after launch.
* Northeast: Concentrate your gaze low toward the south-southeast about 6 to 8 minutes after launch.

For most viewers, the shuttle will appear to literally skim the horizon, so be sure there are no buildings or trees to obstruct your view.

Depending upon your distance from the coastline, the shuttle will be relatively low on the horizon (5 to 15 degrees; your fist on an outstretched arm covers about 10 degrees of sky). If you're positioned near the edge of a viewing circle, the shuttle will barely come above the horizon and could be obscured by low clouds or haze.

If the weather is clear, the shuttle should be easy to see. It will appear to move very fast; much faster than an orbiting satellite due to its near orbital velocity at low altitudes (30-60 mi). It basically travels across 90 degrees of azimuth in less than a minute.



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 11:04 PM
link   
reply to post by Pauligirl
 


North American observers will have several opportunities to watch the "chase" and then the docked shuttle and ISS during this mission.

There are several places that will show you times and visibility for your location.

Two of my favorites are "Live Real Time Tracking" and "Heavens Above.
Links:
www.n2yo.com...

www.heavens-above.com...

Live Tracking will show current positions of many other satellites from your ISP location.

Heavens Above covers many objects, including stars and planets, and allows you to be very specific about your location as well.

According to the latter, the ISS is often visible DURING DAYLIGHT, and will continue to be as it nears completion.

Good luck.

As of midnight, 25 August, the ISS was just S.W. of New Zealand.

jw



posted on Aug, 25 2009 @ 02:35 PM
link   
Seems they have put the launch back till tomorrow.



"The vehicle and the operations were cooperating, but the local weather unfortunately did not," Nickolenko informed the astronauts.
"When the weather is ready to cooperate, we'll be ready to go," replied commander Rick Sturckow.

Another 30 minutes, and "I think we'd have a real good shot today," said Mike Moses, chairman of the mission management team. But time ran out in the wee hours.

Forecasters put the odds of good launching weather Wednesday at 70 percent.

physorg.com Article



posted on Aug, 25 2009 @ 03:18 PM
link   

Originally posted by UmbraSumus
Apparently i will be able to witness the " space chase " between Discovery and the ISS.
Any body know off hand , how soon after launch , such a manoeuvre takes place ?


Rigt now, the schedule simply says the docking is on "Mission Day 3". I suppose they will know a more exact time once they lift off (I'm sure the docking time is dependent upon the liftoff time).

It takes them a while to dock with the ISS after liftoff. "Mission Day One" (launch day) is usually spent getting the payload bay doors open, deploying the KU-band antenna, and I'm sure doing some "spaceworthiness" checks. "Mission Day Two" is spent performing a detailed survey of the outside of the shuttle using cameras attached to the robotic arm. This inspection is to check for any damage from liftoff. Mission Day Three is usually when most shuttle missions dock to the ISS.

Besides -- it takes a couple of days for the shuttle to slowly reach the orbital position of the ISS. They don't go directly there on launch...instead their initial orbit is relatively far from the ISS, and the shuttle gets a little higher and a little closer on each subsequent orbit.

Back in 2006, I saw the Shuttle and ISS in the sky together sometime after undocking. It was an interesting sight -- there were two bright white dots in the sky moving in a line (about a hand's width apart at the end of an outstretched arm), one following directly behind the other.


[edit on 8/25/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



new topics

top topics



 
5

log in

join