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LCROSS mission surly will get some Galactic observation.

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posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 11:18 PM
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The LCROSS mission surly will get Galactic/ET observation with these two impact's on our Moon,so eye's to the Moon from now to the impact October 9.
Impact should be armed right? for bigger disbursement of Lunar surface debris for study.I haven't found anything on explosive head for impact but it's logical right?
I'm figuring that if LCROSS has a Nuke on-board it will be observed from now and something may happen to it Before Impact as some of the rumours of UFO's around area 51 when some tests were being conducted seem to of concluded that nuke weapons were disarmed/Shut down.



LCROSS Overview and watch the Video.Download the song "Water on the Moon" written by LCROSS Deputy Project Manager John Marmie! Performed by John Marmie and Jeff Petro.
Available in Video as well!

This is our time to observe,I'm wondering if Mr(Robbie) Williams got that Big telescope I read about 2-3ys ago?


Zelong.

[edit on 23/8/09 by Zelong]




posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 11:43 PM
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No. It's not logical.

Neither LCROSS nor Centaur are carrying explosives (nuclear or otherwise). The idea is to analysis the debris kicked up by the impact. The more foreign material introduced into the ejecta, the more difficult the spectrographic analysis. This is the reason for the venting of residual fuel from Centaur (LROSS will consume its fuel before impact).



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 11:45 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
No. It's not logical.

Neither LCROSS nor Centaur are carrying explosives (nuclear or otherwise). The idea is to analysis the debris kicked up by the impact. The more foreign material introduced into the ejecta, the more difficult the spectrographic analysis. This is the reason for the venting of residual fuel from Centaur (LROSS will consume its fuel before impact).


Thank you for posting that explaination Phage. I guess people just don't get what these missions are for.



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 11:50 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
No. It's not logical.

Neither LCROSS nor Centaur are carrying explosives (nuclear or otherwise). The idea is to analysis the debris kicked up by the impact. The more foreign material introduced into the ejecta, the more difficult the spectrographic analysis. This is the reason for the venting of residual fuel from Centaur (LROSS will consume its fuel before impact).


Thanks Phage now that is logical of course,I think more so "The more foreign material introduced into the ejecta" will be analysed the Known material will be discarded.

Zelong.



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 11:55 PM
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reply to post by Zelong
 

No.

It's not that simple. You can't simply filter out the known substances. Chemical explosives and nuclear reactions produce new compounds and elements depending on the existing materials they "burn". The fewer new compounds produced, the better the data. There is no reason to complicate things, the kinetic energy of the impact will be quite sufficient to produce enough virgin material to study.



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 12:03 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Ok Phage,my nuke term my be a bit strong but I figured some sort of deeper impact to open the Luner surface up/out.

If there is observers they will be around Maybe.

regards
Zelong.



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 12:24 AM
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Haven't we done this before? I seem to recall a satellite mission that was coming to an end and they decided to let it crash and see what happens. Was it the Japanese satellite? Anyway, I'm not too worried about galactic intervention. All you have to do is look at all of the past travesties that were not intervened.

Oh, and then there is this:




posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 12:56 AM
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Originally posted by Zelong
The LCROSS mission surly will get Galactic/ET observation with these two impact's on our Moon...


Why would it get the attention of any alien race? The debris cloud kicked up by LCROSS will only be 6 miles high. By contrast, the solar system is perhaps 100,000 AU across. And there are dozens and dozens of similar-sized and larger impacts by asteroids across the solar system every year. Why would this one pitiful impact get their attention?



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 02:25 AM
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Originally posted by DoomsdayRex

Originally posted by Zelong
The LCROSS mission surly will get Galactic/ET observation with these two impact's on our Moon...


Why would it get the attention of any alien race? The debris cloud kicked up by LCROSS will only be 6 miles high. By contrast, the solar system is perhaps 100,000 AU across. And there are dozens and dozens of similar-sized and larger impacts by asteroids across the solar system every year. Why would this one pitiful impact get their attention?


G'day DoomsdayRex,good reply "dozens of similar-sized and larger impacts by asteroids across the solar system every year." yes DoomsdayRex but Nature hits,known hits by observers(if any).
Now ours is premeditated,an aggressive strike could be misunderstood


Zelong.



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 03:25 AM
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This Impact, the second one will have to be for Mining resources,Depth, Strength,Navigate etc...
And will be similar to the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (No Need to download as the info is below.)
But go further and penetrate the Lunar surface and stay for future readings and Navigate,there has to be an internal probe


Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment The Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (DLRE) will measure surface and subsurface temperatures from orbit. It will identify cold traps and potential ice deposits, as well as rough terrain, rock abundance, and other landing hazards.



Zelong.



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 02:21 AM
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reply to post by Zelong
 


This is a very bad bad course of action by the U.S government! but it is rumored that president Obama plans to reveal the existence of UFO and extraterrestrial life, Bombing the moon would have a devastating effect on not only the Moon but Earth as well.To use a comparison we all know the moons gravity is known to create waves and so forth on earth, so imagine dropping a ball into a cup of water ( you get a particular effect that where all used to) but then imaging denting the ball and dropping it in a cup of water (you would get a very different and unsettling effect)not only that but the potential retaliation that we will receive from extraterrestrial life in the universe! The extraterrestrials have been stopping us for years from developing nukes and there have been many military reports of missiles been shut down whilst there was sighting ufo presence. we should all keep our eyes to the sky on October 9th and see if we can witness it! so break out your telescopes! Is there a way we can find out a time when this bombing will take place or will there be a time period? i live in Australia so im thinking if we break out the telescopes we might just witness the action?



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 02:32 AM
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posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 02:46 AM
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Originally posted by Tanya_jade_86
reply to post by Zelong
 

Bombing the moon would have a devastating effect on not only the Moon but Earth as well.To use a comparison we all know the moons gravity is known to create waves and so forth on earth, so imagine dropping a ball into a cup of water ( you get a particular effect that where all used to) but then imaging denting the ball and dropping it in a cup of water (you would get a very different and unsettling effect)not only that but the potential retaliation that we will receive from extraterrestrial life in the universe!


I believe that the word to 'bomb' is used only when an accelerant or explosive charge is used to produce an explosion. As detailed in the first few responses, to make the interpretation of data easier, and to stop the creation of extra random compounds, there will not be any explosives used in this experiment.

As for the cup and ball analogy, yes, it can be used, but you have to take into account the relative sizes and densities of the cup and ball respectively, trajectory, and the velocity of them both at the point of impact. If you drop a large ball in a small cup at high speed, yes, you get certain effects. However if you drop a grain of rice in a large bucket, these effects are somewhat smaller.

All in all, do you really think that scientists are going to conduct experiments that they know would cause major tidal and gravitational disruptions on Earth?

As for extraterrestrial retaliation, hmm did we speak to their Ambassador to get this confirmed? Does this mean that 'they' have claimed 'our' moon?

The last time I checked, we have no 100% clear proof of extraterrestrial life either here, or on another planet - be life a one celled amoeba, grey dwarf, or a Dalek.

Some things we just don't need to worry about.



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 03:01 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
No. It's not logical.


Your Right I agree


It's totally ILLOGICAL to drop two impactors to stir up the dirt to the amount they claim will be tossed into space when what you are doing is targeting any water ice that might be there...

If there is water ice there how smart is it to blast it to smitherines? Wouldn't it be rare enough to save every bit? But no... those eco terrorists pretending to be scientists are gonna scatter god only knows how many tons all over the place so it can burn off into space...

Hey Cletus... looky here... there was water there afterall... well I guess we showed em...

Logic uh huh...

Gold ole Nasa strikes again...

Cosmic Litterbugs and Eco Terrorists



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 03:21 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 

Give me a break. My statement was in reference to this:


I haven't found anything on explosive head for impact but it's logical right?


I guess the much larger and faster objects (like asteroids) which hit the moon just leave the water lying around. Hmmm. As a matter of fact, they probably do.

The LCROSS impact will have the same effect on the water (if it is indeed there) as any other object that might naturally impact it. Most (>90%) of any water that is excavated by LCROSS will most likely return to nearby “cold traps”. The LCROSS impact is actually a slow impact and, thus, most of the material is not thrown very high upward, rather outward, adjacent to the impact site. Of the water that does get thrown upward, much of it will actually return to the Moon and eventually find its way back to the dark, cold craters. This is actually one possible way that the water was supplied in the first place: it was deposited following the impacts of comets and asteroids.

There is about 12,500 square km of permanently shadowed terrain on the Moon. If the top 1 meter of this area were to hold 1% (by mass) water, that would be equivalent to about 4.1 x 1011 liters of water! This is approximately 2% the volume of the Great Salt Lake in Utah. The LCROSS impact will excavate a crater approximately 20 meters in diameter, or about one-trillionth the total permanently shadowed area. It is safe to say the LCROSS impact will not have a lasting effect on lunar water, if it does indeed exist.

lcross.arc.nasa.gov...

Hey looky there Zorgon. They've thought about it. LCROSS is going to make a hole the size of a medium sized swimming pool. But the great majority of the material in that hole is not water. Any ice that may exist is not in the form of frozen lakes, it is in the form of crystals attached to particles of moon dust or is in the form of hydrated minerals. The majority of that material will stay right there on the Moon.

[edit on 9/11/2009 by Phage]



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 05:18 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
Hey looky there Zorgon. They've thought about it. LCROSS is going to make a hole the size of a medium sized swimming pool. But the great majority of the material in that hole is not water. Any ice that may exist is not in the form of frozen lakes, it is in the form of crystals attached to particles of moon dust or is in the form of hydrated minerals. The majority of that material will stay right there on the Moon.


Hmmm well early reports said several tons many miles into the 'air'... at the rate we're going in another 10 years there will be so much debris scattered all over the Moon you won't be able to detect a real anomaly from space junk...

So who gets to clean up all that mess? Bet it has decent scrap value
... Maybe I should buy shares in a space recycling company


But as you say...

" Most (>90%) of any water that is excavated by LCROSS will most likely return "

Well let the children play with their bombs or impactors or comet busters or phaser canons... Its not like I will be getting out there anytime soon
and let them give 11 million dollars to Wheeling Jesuit University... what the heck it's onlt tax dollars....

And the Federal Reserve can't account for 9 TRILLION last fiscal years so why worry be happy...

I go find my Rum and get 'happy'



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 04:52 PM
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LCROSS_NASA announces,


LCROSS carries no ordinances, no explosives.It is a kinetic impactor,energy creates 20m crater w/in 40km+ existing crater.



Zelong.



posted on Sep, 30 2009 @ 09:09 PM
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LCROSS dual impact targets Cabeus A crater.


The mission team announced Wednesday that Cabeus will be the target crater for the LCROSS dual impacts scheduled for 7:30 a.m. EDT on Oct. 9, 2009. The crater was selected after an extensive review as the optimal location for LCROSS' evaluation of whether water ice exists at the lunar south pole.
LCROSS will search for water ice by sending its spent upper-stage Centaur rocket to impact the permanently shadowed polar crater. The satellite will fly into the plume of dust left by the impact and measure the properties before also colliding with the lunar surface. The LCROSS team selected Cabeus A based on a set of conditions that include proper debris plume illumination for visibility from Earth, a high concentration of hydrogen, and mature crater features such as a flat floor, gentle slopes and the absence of large boulders.....more


For up to date updates: Twitter LCROSS_NASA

Zelong.

EDIT:Thanks for the heads up Phage

Changed Cabeus A to Cabeus ,as per Phage's post below.

Not sure what I did with my post here it should be this:

My target crater has changed from Cabeus A to Cabeus (proper). See more info at6:25 AM Sep 29th from web


From:Twitter LCROSS_NASA

[edit on 1/10/09 by Zelong]



posted on Sep, 30 2009 @ 10:28 PM
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reply to post by Zelong
 

They've reconsidered that decision. Further evaluations of available data has caused the target to be changed to Cabeus instead of Cabeus A

The general consensus of lunar experts led by the LCROSS science team is that Cabeus shows, with the greatest level of certainty, the highest hydrogen concentrations at the south pole. Further consideration of the most current terrain models provided by JAXA's Kaguya spacecraft and the LRO Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) was important in the decision process.The models show a small valley in an otherwise tall Cabeus perimeter ridge, which will allow for sunlight to illuminate the ejecta cloud on Oct. 9, and much sooner than previously estimated for Cabeus. While the ejecta does have to fly to higher elevations to be observed by Earth assets, a shadow cast by a large hill along the Cabeus ridge, provides an excellent, high-contrast, back drop for ejecta and vapor measurements.

www.technobahn.com...



posted on Sep, 30 2009 @ 11:56 PM
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Originally posted by Phage the highest hydrogen concentrations at the south pole.


Hydrogen --> Hindenburg --> LaCross ---> Bomb -->

KABBOOOOOMMMMMM!!!!

Bye Bye 'newly' discovered water

Maybe that is why they got that huge unexpected secondary explosion on Temple 1



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