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Woman Evicted From Her Own House by Mistake

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posted on Aug, 19 2009 @ 02:59 PM
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Do you think that you are safe in your home and don't have to worry about Eviction and Foreclosure?

Think again!



You know times are tough when people are getting kicked out of their house when it’s not even for sale.

The eviction came after Ramirez’s home was mistakenly auctioned off to the highest bidder by her bank, Washington Mutual. Usually, you get a warning before you get the boot. A foreclosure letter. Maybe a sign saying your house is up for sale. Not Ramirez, who found her belongings bashed and battered in the street.


My Bad! Woman's House Mistakenly Auctioned by Bank

It's bad enough when people demolish the wrong address because the GPS reading was off. But now they are throwing families out on the street because of a computer error?

Where did common sense and decency go? That's why Foreclosure is supposed to take at least a year, giving the previous owner an opportunity to vacate before being forcefully evicted by the police...or in this case, an opportunity to go to the bank and point out their grievous computer error...and if they don't fix the error, an opportunity to take them to Court!

This just sickens me.




posted on Aug, 19 2009 @ 03:12 PM
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What sickens me is the entire eviction concept. I know that you have to get people out of the houses, when someone else buys them. But what they do is remove a person's belongings and throw the person out into the street, without ensuring they have anywhere to live. Basically, eviction makes a person homeless.

You may say they "deserve" it for being "deadbeats", but it's not always possible to make your payments. Many people have been laid off or had their hours cut, making finances even more difficult than before. Some people had their mortgage rates go up simply because they were late on a utility bill. Suddenly, their credit cards and mortgage rates all go up. For some, it pushes them over the edge. They can no longer keep up, and their houses are foreclosed.

I feel that anyone who is evicted should be given some sort of emergency shelter. They should be helped in finding work and getting back on their feet. Just throwing their stuff into the streets and bodily removing them from the premises doesn't solve any problem. It just adds to the pain of someone who has already suffered misfortune. A little compassion and assistance could probably spare a great deal of homelessness and needless suffering.

[edit on 8/19/2009 by chiron613]



posted on Aug, 19 2009 @ 03:22 PM
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That is the problem with letting computers make desicions and not humans. Computers can't think and see the mistake. I have heard so many times it is computer automated and there is nothing we can do about it. I still get bill collecters calling for the same lady who I have told them 100s of times that I am no her. They said according to the computer I am her and it is all computer automated.
I once recieved an eviction notice myself. It a computer mistake but was generated because they were not allowing me to renew my lease. Even after calling about the mistake that they admitted. They said it was in the computer so I had to leave.
I told them to give me a week and I would be out. I rent so it is not as bad as being evicted from a home you own. A computer mistake also said that I had noise voilations which was not true either. The first place I applied to turned me down.
I finally found a place yet I had to get a co-leaser. Computer automated decsions are hard to reverse. Most companies believe if it is in the computer it must be true. I bet we will here more of this sort of thing when we let computers make more and more of our descions.



posted on Aug, 19 2009 @ 10:06 PM
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Originally posted by chiron613
You may say they "deserve" it for being "deadbeats", but it's not always possible to make your payments. Many people have been laid off or had their hours cut, making finances even more difficult than before. Some people had their mortgage rates go up simply because they were late on a utility bill. Suddenly, their credit cards and mortgage rates all go up. For some, it pushes them over the edge. They can no longer keep up, and their houses are foreclosed.


I've been evicted once, and I wouldn't say I was deserving of it, or necessarily a dead-beat.

When this Economic Recession first started happening in the IT Sector about 4 years back I was laid-off from my job. Thankfully, I had been saving up for a House, so I was sitting on a lot of Savings. Unfortunately, it was nigh impossible finding a job, any job. I was even applying at Coffee Shops and Fast Food Joints willing to take anything. However, despite having glowing letters of recommendation, excellent references, certifications up the wazoo, and an enviable 25 year work history, no one wanted to hire me because I was too over-qualified to do anything but Senior IT Positions. After 11 months of looking for a job I was desperate enough to consider putting my 10 year old daughter in ragged clothes and putting mud on her face and letting her hold a puppy on the street corner begging for change.

I ended up being out of work for 13 months, and my Savings ran out after 11 months. I had lived in the same place for 12 years and had a flawless history with my Landlord. However the moment I couldn't pay Rent, she didn't want to work anything out and started the Eviction process. My daughter and I were kicked out on our ear with 3 hours to move what we could.

Of course, there was a happy ending to the story, as I got an Senior IT job two days later, and moved into a house. Still, most people don't have those kinds of happy endings.

There are four families left on my street. All the others have been foreclosed and evicted. I didn't know them well enough to say they weren't dead-beats, but they were decent, hard-working folk with small children.

How hard is it for Landlords and Banks to work something out when a family becomes unemployed for an extended period during tough economic times? If they have to pay the Courts for an Eviction and then sell the house at auction for a loss, then they are going to be out far more money than if they just waited for things to turn around for the family and charged them interest on their missed payments.

Thankfully there is federal legislation being discussed to delay Eviction for up to two years, and another plan that would allow Banks to Foreclose on the Mortgage, taking back full ownership of the house and the the family being able to remain in the house for that two years, but at the cost of them losing their equity in the home. It's not the ideal situation, but it's far better of a plan than what we have now.



posted on Aug, 19 2009 @ 10:16 PM
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This story is sad as hell, and it makes me mad!! Its just unbelievable what has happened to this lady and some of you! Goes to show you, some day AI will rule the world :O)

I also have had to move because of the economy, Im not proud of it, but I bought a mobile home for nearly a third of what a house costs. Granted, Im not a fan of houses with wheels, and I know all the redneck jokes..lol BUT, its mine, I own it, and its home.



posted on Aug, 19 2009 @ 10:22 PM
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reply to post by fraterormus
 


Well, this surely is a major mess up, someone will lose their job, she will sue, she'll get some cash and all will be back to normal.

Major inconvenience yes, and somewhat traumatic ...

But honestly, on the scale of things that can go wrong as a result of mistaken identity, this has to go on the minor side.



posted on Aug, 19 2009 @ 10:56 PM
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Well, although one specific instance doesn't seem that bad of a "Whoopsie", there was a commentator on the original news article that said:



I'm a Real Estate Broker, and I can tell you that this sort of thing happens on a regular basis. Especially with the overwhelming flood of foreclosures banks and local governments are facing.


Between the Banks, Mortgage Companies, County Clerk's Offices, the County Assessor's Offices, and County Sheriff's Offices being overwhelmed and inundated with foreclosures, the chance of one of those making an error 1% of the time quickly turns into > 50,000 mistakes like this happening throughout the United States in a year. When you consider that, it becomes a *BIG* "Whoopsie".



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