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US Man 'Stole 130m Card Numbers'

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posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 06:12 PM
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US Man 'Stole 130m Card Numbers'


news.bbc.co.uk

US prosecutors have charged a man with stealing data relating to 130 million credit and debit cards.Officials say it is the biggest case of identity theft in American history.

They say Albert Gonzales, 28, and two unnamed Russian co-conspirators hacked into the payment systems of retailers, including the 7-Eleven chain.

Prosecutors say they aimed to sell the data on. If convicted, Mr Gonzales faces up to 20 years in jail for wire fraud and five years for conspiracy.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 06:12 PM
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Well, well I wonder how deep this goes. The article goes on to explain in detail how this was done. Is this even possible? or is this another reason to allow the government to track every single thing we buy online and off?

Perhaps this is the way they intend to end the use of credit/debit cards all together! You know, by telling us that it is for our own good! Security purposes!

Gee, Thanks Uncle Sam!!!! (sarcasm)

news.bbc.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 06:15 PM
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Things that make you go hhhhhmmmm
second line



posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 06:37 PM
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The way things are going with the general publics finances I bet 143 of the cards had available balances on them



posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 06:40 PM
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I want to know why he's only been charged with wire fraud and conspiracy, why hasn't he been charged with 130 million counts of identity theft ?

Maybe if they start actually charging these low-lifes for each crime they commit it will deter others from doing the same.



posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 07:23 PM
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This caught my eye.


Gonzalez is a former informant for the U.S. Secret Service who helped the agency hunt hackers, authorities say. The agency later found out that he had also been working with criminals and feeding them information on ongoing investigations, even warning off at least one individual, according to authorities.

www.miamiherald.com...

Emphasis mine.

Largest Case of Identity Theft in History and a SS was Involved.

Remember the Secret Service is resposilbe for the investigation of big time financial crime. When they aren't jumping bullets, they're sifting through corporate and private data to find where a papertrail leads. They were certainly on this case. COuld Albert Gonzalez or another conspirator team up with the SS to create a false flag immitating identity theft on an enormous scale? It has been depicted in a film. Why not?

I'm not saying I think all members of the SS are corrupt. I'm certain there are many folks there who have a strong sense of justice and are doing what they think is right. Look at any public institution and you will find a set of exploitation proffesionals.


What ever the case may be, I'm sure there is a clue somewhere in the indictment

www.usdoj.gov...

or whenever the case is over.



posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 07:39 PM
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reply to post by 16grit
 


Nice find


I wonder why he only faces up to 25 years in this case, but faces life in a previous case ?


Also last year, the Justice Department announced additional charges against Gonzalez and others for hacking retail companies' computers for the theft of approximately 40 million credit cards. At the time, that was believed to be the biggest single case of hacking private computer networks to steal credit card data, puncturing the electronic defenses of retailers including T.J. Maxx, Barnes & Noble, Sports Authority and OfficeMax.



Gonzalez faces a possible life sentence if convicted in that case.


www.miamiherald.com...



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by paxnatus
 

Here is the REAL crime:

Heartland disclosed last January that hackers had installed sniffing software on its network that allowed them to capture unencrypted credit card data as transactions were being authorized in its system.


These incompetent companies are transmitting the credit card data UNENCRYPTED!
It doesn't take a genius to use sniffers to capture the credit card data, if it is unencrypted.
My God, this is criminal in its own right.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 01:41 PM
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Yep the bad russians only conspire to do bad things, lol.

Nice of the bbc, who play part in there conspiracies to bring us this story.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 02:00 PM
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Let's see...If I remember right, I only have 48 hours to notify my bank(s) if I feel (or have knowledge that) my credit/debit cards have been stolen or compromised. Beyond that time, the banks are no longer obligated to remove any bogus charges that appear.

Since I know I've used at least two of my cards recently at a 7-11 store, have I, and millions of others, just been notified that we're no longer protected from any theft/fraud that could arise from this?

Former SS?

I better call the bank(s)!



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 02:20 PM
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reply to post by paxnatus
 


130Million? That's probably well over half of the people that hold credit cards in this country.

That's simply amazing, it's almost like the theft of an entire society. And only 25 years? Instead of throwing the book at him, they should beat him with it.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by lernmore
 





Let's see...If I remember right, I only have 48 hours to notify my bank(s) if I feel (or have knowledge that) my credit/debit cards have been stolen or compromised. Beyond that time, the banks are no longer obligated to remove any bogus charges that appear.



Woh, wait a minute. I think you have this backwards. First of all, 45 states have Security Breach laws which specify what the breached companies' responsibilities are regarding notifying YOU. 5 States do NOT have such laws.
At present, to the best of my knowledge, there is NO Federal Breach notification law, other than one applying to breach of health information records.

Here is the link that lists the 45 states that have laws. You can click on each state and find out what your company requirements for notification are:

privacylaw.proskauer.com... w-other-states-tx-nc-me-make-changes/

This information is as of Jul y 30, 2009.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 02:54 PM
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reply to post by ProfEmeritus
 


It works both ways. not only does the bank have an obligation to notify you of a breach, you also have a "duty" to notify them if your cards are lost/ stolen.

I'll look for the "fine print" I remember reading on one of my specific account "agreements" and will post it. I know it's here somewhere.

Different institutions have different policies, but here's a general example of what I'm talking about.


Your role as a responsible cardholder is to notify your financial institution within two business days from the moment you realize your card has been lost or stolen. If you notify your financial institution within two business days of learning that your card was lost or stolen, your liability is capped at $50.

debitfacts.org...


What I'm saying is... can they now try to claim that I had prior knowledge should something get charged without my consent?

You know how banks just love that fine print.

typo:

[edit on 18-8-2009 by lernmore]



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by lernmore
 





It works both ways. not only does the bank have an obligation to notify you of a breach, you also have a "duty" to notify them if your cards are lost/ stolen.

Of course. I understand that. However, you do NOT know for sure that your credit card number was stolen. All you have is a news article. That is not proof that your card number was stolen. You could, if you are worried, tell the card issuer that you believe it might be. They will then close out that number, and issue you a new card and number. Until you receive it, you will not be able to use that account. If you are concerned, you can do that. However, given that reports of theft of cards are happening almost every day, you will spend most of your time on the phone. It is your call.

By the way, READ what you posted. It says that you must notify them if your CARD is stolen. Did your CARD get stolen? Furthermore, if you are concerned, you should secure your card with a pin for extra protection, or sign up for credit protection.




What I'm saying is... can they now try to claim that I had prior knowledge should something get charged without my consent

No, unless you have been notified that your number has been stolen.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by ProfEmeritus
 


I hear ya. I'm not too worried about it, and my first post was just supposed to be a poke at what we do here given the nature of this site. I guess the CT in me decided to say "what if?", and prompted me to actually think about it. Time for an ice-cream sandwich!




posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 11:05 PM
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I'm going to go out on a limb here with this. Who's to say that Gonzalez wasn't set up to take the fall for this? Maybe he has been groomed for this heist all along? Guess I watch too many movies!
.

Thank you Prof. for clarifying the info. You are exactly right. The banks will and do notify you, if your card has been compromised. Both my husband and my mom were notified and issued new cards, just recently.




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