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Canadian Health Care - Thumbs Up or Down?

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posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 09:04 AM
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Calling on all you residents of the Great White North. I find that I have been doing a lot of posting with regard to the American debate on Universal Health Care. This is not, as some may think, a matter of trolling or trying to spread my Pinko Agenda. But it is in response to some of the fairy tales and misrepresentations with which the Average American is being assailed. My thing is, work it out amongst yourselves, but don't drag us into it as an example of things gone wrong.

So, for this thread, how about Canadians check in with a simple note of approval...Thumbs Up or Thumbs Down ('Da' or 'Nyet' if you prefer )
, and a second line to make all legal. I'm tired of us being offered up as straw men...lets have a straw poll instead.

Would you trade our system for a private for-profit one such as Big Health is promoting in the US?

Me, no. It ain't perfect, but our system continues to serve me and mine exceedingly well.




posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 04:30 PM
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I definitely think our neighbors(neh-bers? :lol
ohhh that was bad, have a better system.

however, we can't afford a decent national healthcare system here now, so i'm against obamacare. plus i don't trust the aims of the new bill.



posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 


I like the Canadian method too. Not love, but I believe it works well enough. But I simply don't see a system that works on 30 million with a government moreover than not directed in the people's interests working on a nation of 300 million where the government is working in it's own interests, not the people.



posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 04:38 PM
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It saves me and my family bout 50K a year, just for my son's illnesses alone.

So I have a big thumbs up. It's not perfect, but nothing is, there are horror stories ofcourse.

All in all, I like the system.

~Keeper



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 09:52 AM
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Our system works well enough but there is room for improvement. we are cared for well enough and most of us have private insurance as well just in case but the basic foundation of the system seems to work just fine.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 10:10 AM
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reply to post by habfan1968
 


I wasn't aware that both government and private insurance existed in Canada. Can you explain how that works?



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by Gorman91
reply to post by habfan1968
 
I wasn't aware that both government and private insurance existed in Canada. Can you explain how that works?


I am insured for what's called 'extended health care' through my employer. It covers drugs, dental, orthodics and 'appliances', vision care, massage, chiropractic, upgrade to private hospital room...stuff like that. Some form of extended benefits is a common perq for Canadian workers...especially in a unionised environment.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 10:34 AM
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I think the system we have in Canada is good. It is not perfect and the biggest problem I see with it is Doctors and Nurses leaving Canada to go work for big bucks in the States.

The biggest problem with health care on a global scale is that it is a buisness. To me it comes down to people making money off of other peoples misery. By this I mean huge profits, I would expect someone who is in the health care industry to make a living but the size of profits insurance companies and pharmacutical companies make is outrageous. In some cases it is the equivalent of a mugging. If you don't hand over your cash you suffer through whatever illness it is you have. Kind of like being pistol whipped by a mugger when you refuse to hand over your cash.

edited for typos

[edit on 18-8-2009 by Gargamel]



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 10:35 AM
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It's not what it used to be but it's still pretty damn good. I had chest pains at work a few months ago and was admitted immediately and observed and tested all day. Stress test followed promptly. The ticker is fine.

The problem is that there are too many people that use Emerg. for useless things like colds, while people wait to get a bone set. Go to the damn Walk In Clinic or wait a week to see your doctor. Hell, the problem will probably be cleared up by then.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 10:43 AM
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I'm not a Canadian, but am very curious to hear the responses to this thread.



Originally posted by intrepid
It's not what it used to be but it's still pretty damn good. I had chest pains at work a few months ago and was admitted immediately and observed and tested all day. Stress test followed promptly. The ticker is fine.


Glad to hear it. I had a similar experience but felt okay about going to the ER because "Emergency Room Care" is fully covered by my insurance... And still, we got a bill for $450!

I was buying my prescription from Canada for a while and it was WONDERFUL! They were so on the ball. It was the best customer service I've ever had!



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 10:45 AM
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The guy in the next cube had to bring his brother to Michigan to get a back operation because the condition wasn't serious enough in Canada. His employer gave him a year to rest and heal 2 months after the operation he's fine and now they want him to return to work. He paid 9k$ out of his pocket for the operation.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 10:48 AM
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www.news1130.com...

This is interesting, so what do you guys think of Dr. Robert Ouellette's comments?

Dr. Robert Ouellette, the outgoing president of the CMA, says he's worried about where we're headed. The Montreal radiologist says the system could implode if we don't make changes.
www.news1130.com...
Do they know something you don't?



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 10:51 AM
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its good, because an illness wont bankrupt u.
its not good because they have allowed private insurance companies in, who nickel and dime u to death.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 10:53 AM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


Yup:


Ouellette says wait times are the big worry to both patients and those in the medical communities -- doctors, nurses and therapists. "It is possible to have a universal system without significant wait times. This is the goal we want to achieve in the transformation we want to implement."

He says any talk of moving away from a 100 per cent universal system gets some people thinking we're on our way to a US system. However, he says we must forget the rhetoric and move on so we can make the necessary changes.


Already addressed in this thread. Use the appropriate venue for the ailment. Also the lack of doctors because they are moving to the States for "greener pastures". He is not talking about removing the "Universal system", he's talking about improving it.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 10:58 AM
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reply to post by intrepid
 


I would like to see us have some kinda healthcare, but Obama said the Canadian system won't work here, I really don't think that American politicians have a well thought out HC plan.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 11:02 AM
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Long time lurker, first time poster....hi everyone!

Having been through childbirth, phototreatment and a melanoma (plus another pregnancy this winter) I have to say I am so glad that I live here. I am more than willing to pay the taxes regarding health care if it means that families do not have to bankrupt themselves in order to keep a family member alive. I believe the social costs outweigh the financial costs and keeps medicine about healing and not profitting. Is it perfect? No. But its better than the alternative of having to pay for everything out of pocket. Or a panel of doctors deciding whether or not to treat your condition based on how much it would cost.

Not that I have tonnes of cash to throw around but I believe that once the insurance companies get into the business of saving lives and people having a better quality of life then its a business pure and simple. I use my benefits to cover dental, massage etc. but to think that if I get really sick my thoughts will be "do we have to sell the house", "should I cash in my LIRA or my RRSP" when I really should be concentrating on getting better.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 11:10 AM
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reply to post by canuckistanian
 


How much is you income taxed for healthcare?



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 11:12 AM
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Originally posted by Stormdancer777
reply to post by canuckistanian
 


How much is you income taxed for healthcare?


Health care is covered by the provincial sales tax. I believe it's 7%.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 11:14 AM
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bottom line... everyone in Canada is covered... with some private health care added on you can get your glasses, eye exams, massage etc all covered for a few more dollars a month... persoanlly, i couldn't imagine having to decide whether i can afford to "get well" or not... sad when business makes money from misery, as someone suggested above... canadian system? thumbs up!



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 11:35 AM
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Originally posted by intrepid

Originally posted by Stormdancer777
reply to post by canuckistanian
 


How much is you income taxed for healthcare?


Health care is covered by the provincial sales tax. I believe it's 7%.


Ok, here's the long answer...


Funding for the insurance plans comes from the general revenues of the Canadian provinces/territories, assisted by transfer payments from the federal government through the Canada Health Transfer. Some provinces charge health care premiums, but these are in effect taxes (since they are not tied to service use, nor to provincial health expenditures). The system is accordingly classified by the OECD as a tax-supported system, as opposed to the social insurance approaches used in many European countries. en.wikipedia.org...



Health and Prescription Insurance Tax Ontario charges a tax on income for the health system. These amounts are collected through the income tax system, and do not determine eligibility for public health care. The Ontario Health Premium is an additional amount charged on an individual's income tax that ranges from $300 for people with $20,000 of taxable income to $900 for high income earners. Individuals with less than $20,000 in taxable income are exempt. Quebec also requires residents to obtain prescription insurance. When an individual does not have insurance, they must pay an income-derived premium. As these are income related, they are considered to be a tax on income under the law in Canada. Other provinces, such as British Columbia, charge premiums collected outside of the tax system for the provincial medicare systems. These are usually reduced or eliminated for low-income people. Alberta does not levy any taxes or premiums for its provincial medicare [1].

Comparison of taxes paid by a household earning the country's average wage (as of 2005)

Country Single no children Married 2 children


Canada 31.6% 21.5%
United States 29.1% 11.9%
United Kingdom 33.5% 27.1%

en.wikipedia.org...


Bottom line is that our standard of living is at least as good as America's...factoring in the recent financial shenanigans and the fact that our banking system is healthier. Yes, we're covered...no, we're not taxed into poverty for the privilege. Hope that helps.



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