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IBM uses DNA to make next-gen microchips

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posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 07:08 PM
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Well, not real DNA:
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Artificial DNA nanostructures, or "DNA origami" may provide a cheap framework on which to build tiny microchips, according to a paper published on Sunday in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.


This is interesting stuff. They are using DNA as a model for next generation microchips.


"Basically, this is telling us that biological structures like DNA actually offer some very reproducible, repetitive kinds of patterns that we can actually leverage in semiconductor processes," he said.


This is good news because it will drastically cut costs in the manufacturing process, making it ever easier and cost effective to allow microchips to assist us in our daily lives.


Right now, the tinier the chip, the more expensive the equipment. Narayan said that if the DNA origami process scales to production-level, manufacturers could trade hundreds of millions of dollars in complex tools for less than a million dollars of polymers, DNA solutions, and heating implements. "The savings across many fronts could add up significantly," he said.


We're going to have to wait about a decade for this technology to be of any significant use, but it's great to see that work in this area is expanding into new and uncharted areas.


TA

[edit on 16-8-2009 by TheAssociate]




posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 07:56 PM
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It actually goes a BIT deeper than just nano-scale self-assembly, wherein I think work on proteins is actually making more headway. The great promise of DNA origami is that, eventually, we can build 3D structures with it using tiles. Right now, processors are 2D on a flat silicon wafer. The next progression in transistor technology will be to make them into complex 3D structures.




posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 07:59 PM
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So this is the basis for replicators? I think so. If DNA can build a microchip, why not a house? Why not a car? Why not a shirt?



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 09:07 PM
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reply to post by Lasheic
 




The great promise of DNA origami is that, eventually, we can build 3D structures with it using tiles.


Interesting stuff! Can't remember the title, but I saw a show on that subject a while back on one of the science channels. Thanks and star for the info and the video.


TA



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 10:14 PM
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reply to post by Lasheic
 


Really fascinating stuff. Just, imagine even beyond that of a 3d chip. What a 4d chip would be like.

I've heard anti-gravity fields mess with time. For instance if you were suspended in an anti-gravity field going 100 mph in a car it would look like 1,000 mph to the outside observer. Imagine if these 3d chips were suspended in an anti-gravity field. We would be able to increase the speed of the chip to the ratio of the car example. I think that is what we will see after 3d chips come about, a 4d chip.

*pears into the future* *geeks talking*"Dude your 3d 4,000 ghz 9,000 core CPU/GPU processor is so last year... I can play Doom 27 on Max settings at 80 fps with my 4d processor."



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 10:24 PM
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reply to post by sliceNodice
 





I think that is what we will see after 3d chips come about, a 4d chip.


That would be so incredibly cool.


Then again, I'm always fascinated by any advancement in technology that might allow me to run more RTAS plugins in Pro Tools simultaneously.


Thanks and star for the peek into the future.


TA

[edit on 16-8-2009 by TheAssociate]



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 11:10 PM
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Originally posted by ExPostFacto
So this is the basis for replicators? I think so. If DNA can build a microchip, why not a house? Why not a car? Why not a shirt?


They're using DNA as a model, not as the fabrication mechanism.

Nanotechnology will one day be used for fabricating raw materials, but we'll still need to assemble those raw materials into the final product. Well, we will, or more likely, androids will.

Give it about 50 years.



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