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Secret Codes You Aren’t Meant To Know

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posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 02:22 PM
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The use of codes is intended to convey essential information quickly and with a minimum of misunderstanding to staff. Some places use secret codes to pass information between store employees. These are meant to be a secret as they don’t want to alarm the non-staff members or alert someone like a thief to the fact that they have been noticed.


Name Codes

Code Oscar: On a ship, a code oscar means someone has gone overboard. If the ship has to maneuver erratically to handle the situation, it must also send out blasts on the signal so that other ships nearby are aware of the fact that it is about to change its course. It should be noted that ships don’t have an internationally standardized set of PA signals and they can differ from place to place, but this is a fairly commonly used one.

Code delta: can mean that there is a biological hazard - though who knows what that might be on a passenger ship.

Code Alpha: often means “medical emergency”.

Code Adam: was invented by Walmart but it is now an internationally recognized alert. It means “missing child”. The code was first coined in 1994 in memory of Adam Walsh, a six-year old, who went missing in a Sears department store in Florida in 1981. Adam was later found murdered. The person making the announcement will state “we have a code Adam,” followed by a description of the missing child. As soon as the alert is heard, security staff will begin to monitor the doors and other exits. If the child is not found within 10 minutes, the police are alerted and a store search begins. Also, if the child is found in the first 10 minutes in the company of an unknown adult, the police must be called and the person detained if it is safe to do so.

Computer Support Codes


In computer support, a variety of codes can be used when referring to a customer


PEBKAC: Problem Exists Between Keyboard And Chair

PICNIC: Problem in chair - not in computer

ID 10 T Error: ID 10 T is, of course, IDIOT

Doctor" Codes


"Doctor" codes are often used in hospital settings for announcements over a general loudspeaker or paging system that might cause panic or endanger a patient's privacy. Most often, "Doctor" codes take the form of "Paging Dr. _____", where the doctor's "name" is a codeword for a dangerous situation or a patient in crisis.


Doctor Brown: is a code word often used in hospitals to alert security staff to a threat to personnel. If a nurse or doctor is in danger from a violent patient or non-staff member, they can page Doctor Brown to their location and the security staff will rush to their aid. In some hospitals

Dr. Allcome: Serious emergency. "Doctor Allcome to Ward 5." would indicate that all medical staff not presently occupied are needed. (The Med, Memphis Tennessee)

Dr. Firestone: Fire in the hospital. If a fire's location can be isolated, the location of the fire is included in the page, e.g. "Paging Dr. Firestone to 3 West" indicates "Fire in or near west stairwell/wing on third floor" (William Beaumont Hospitals, Royal Oak and Troy, MI).

Dr. Pyro: Fire in the hospital/healthcare facility. "Paging Dr. Pyro on ____" indicates a fire and its origin or current location, e.g. "Paging Dr. Pyro on 3" means "Fire on third floor" (Kaiser Permanente, system-wide).

Dr. Strong: Patient needing either physical assistance or physical restraint. "Paging Dr. Strong ..." indicates that any physically capable personnel (orderlies, police or security officers, EMTs or firemen, etc.) in the proximity should report and be prepared either to move a patient who "fell down" and cannot get back up or to "capture and restrain" an uncooperative patient.

"Colour" Codes

Code Black:

- In Australia code black is a personal threat. This incorporates a diverse range of situations including assaults, confrontations, hostage situations and threats of personal injury or attack

- Bomb Threat (Ontario, Manitoba)

- In the military code black is bomb threat or discovery of suspicious package.

Code Gray/Grey

- A combative person with no weapon under HASC suggestions.

- Severe Weather (Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, TX)

Code Green

-A combative person using physical force, especially weapons. (some American hospitals)

-Used to indicate an evacuation situation, and can refer to the evacuation of a ward/floor/wing or the entire hospital (Code Green - Stat) depending on the call (Ontario Hospital Emergency Codes, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority)

Code Pink

- Biohazardous contamination of a patient or staff. (Heartland Regional Medical Center)

- Patient is under influence of illegal substances (UK First Aid organisations)

Code Purple

- Australian Standard for Bomb or Substance alert

- Hostage situation or patient abduction (Ontario Hospital Association)

- Emergency department can no longer accept patients; divert incoming cases to other hospitals if at all possible (Canada, also Wellstar Health Group)

Code Silver

- Combative person with a Lethal Weapon (HASC recommendations).

- Violent Situation - Lockdown (Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, TX)

Code Yellow

- Missing patient (Ontario Hospital Emergency Codes).

Code Orange

- Used in Ontario hospitals to indicate an external disaster with mass casualties. Lockdown or controlled facility access is often used as part of the response. Volunteers, Families and Students were denied access during SARS Outbreak of 2003.

Code Brown

- Missing Adult (University of Toledo Medical Center) (University of Cincinnati Medical Center)

------------------------------------------------

Source




posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 02:40 PM
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Reply to post by phi1618
 


sorry but I have been in over 50 hospitals and the codes listed are wrong at least for the US. Ill post a list when I get home


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 02:42 PM
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ID10T is an on going joke in the military. Every new person coming out of basic pretty much is asked/sent to the supply room for some "ID-10-T in a can". Yeah, I fell for it. They say it out loud, so you don't really think about. The sgt says - write it down and I'll check it out, so I write it down and "doh!"

Also popular was sending them for can of "camouflage paint".

And for tankers, we would give the new guys a tire pressure gauge, and tell them to check the pressure in the roadwheels, and see how long they would look for a stem before realizing they are solid rubber and don't hold air.

[edit on 8/16/2009 by badmedia]



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 03:32 PM
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reply to post by phi1618
 


I am studying medicine and haven't come across any codes like this?



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 03:45 PM
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reply to post by badmedia
 


Another couple of classics - telling someone to go and ask for a 'long weight' or 'a left handed mallet / screwdriver'. I knew more but can't remember them now.

There were some doctors shorthand ones that got so notorious in the NHS they were quite publicly banned - I'll have a quick google see if I can find them.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 03:48 PM
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reply to post by FredT
 


Ya our codes are completely different. It's actually a facility to facility code system there is no standard except for the code blue.

Code black - escapee
Code brown - a patient had a bad case of the runs and someone needs to clean it up usually a geriatric patient.
Code green - staff need assistance (usually a combative person)
Code 1 - armed intruder
Code orange - bomb threat
Red/Red drill - fire/fire drill
Blue - medical emergency of course

There's more but I don't have my name tag with me to check them all on the back lol.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 04:06 PM
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You forgot: Code White = Do not delay/detain, on the highest authority. (for example, if you have penultimate clearance.)



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 04:07 PM
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I once sent a spectacularly disrespectful Private to the company office to retrieve a PRC-E/6. As planned, he went straight to my platoon sergeant and asked where he could find a PRC-E/6.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 04:20 PM
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As a trucker when asked what I'm carrying for my load and your running empty, you tell them Auger holes or Sail Boat Fuel they look at you funny till they think about it for a while!

Zindo



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 04:59 PM
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Sorry, but everything that you posted is public knowledge that can be accessed in ANY public library or you could just ask a Paramedic or Nurse...no conspiracy, no secret.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 05:00 PM
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Wiki has a list of codes, Australia uses a Standards based system.

Hospital Emergency Codes


Hospital Emergency Codes are used in hospitals worldwide to alert staff to various emergency situations. The use of codes is intended to convey essential information quickly and with a minimum of misunderstanding to staff, while preventing stress or panic among visitors to the hospital. These codes may be posted on placards throughout the hospital, or printed on employee/staff identification badges for ready reference.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by FredT
 


im not sure if these apply everywhere, but i would love to read what you have to post



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 05:24 PM
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Code black?



We use so much abbreviation and slang in the kitchen that it's essentially code. Almost every time you get a group of people together working on something repetitive, code develops and communication becomes more efficient as a result.

That also means that no codes are standardized, code black in the military means a different thing than code black at the country club.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 06:04 PM
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I work in healthcare. The only code mentioned above that I've heard used in a hospital was Dr. Strong.

You have Dr. Brown listed- There is a "code brown" in healthcare. It's unofficial and gross.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 06:16 PM
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were I work you here some one yell " 5-0.. 5-0 " means some one of authoraty
such as supervisor or team leader

as in Hawaii 5-0



posted on Aug, 20 2009 @ 01:02 PM
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Originally posted by Darthorious
reply to post by FredT
 


Ya our codes are completely different. It's actually a facility to facility code system there is no standard except for the code blue.
Code brown - a patient had a bad case of the runs and someone needs to clean it up usually a geriatric patient.

Code green - staff need assistance (usually a combative person)
Code orange - bomb threat
Red/Red drill - fire/fire drill
Blue - medical emergency of course

There's more but I don't have my name tag with me to check them all on the back lol.


THATS Exactly what I said "I need my damm name tag" . I can tell you however, in my role as a transport nurse I go to alot of facilities and the codes are pretty much standard at least here in california. However, Code Brown, is never announced overhead


[edit on 8/20/09 by FredT]



posted on Aug, 20 2009 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by Griever0311
 


Ha ha....also, a box of grid squares, batteries for the chem lights...

and my favorite: "hey private get up there and ZERO the tourette".



posted on Nov, 27 2013 @ 12:56 PM
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phi1618


Code Adam: was invented by Walmart but it is now an internationally recognized alert. It means “missing child”. The code was first coined in 1994 in memory of Adam Walsh, a six-year old, who went missing in a Sears department store in Florida in 1981. Adam was later found murdered. The person making the announcement will state “we have a code Adam,” followed by a description of the missing child. As soon as the alert is heard, security staff will begin to monitor the doors and other exits. If the child is not found within 10 minutes, the police are alerted and a store search begins. Also, if the child is found in the first 10 minutes in the company of an unknown adult, the police must be called and the person detained if it is safe to do so.








Code Adam seems a tad pessimistic :/ They couldn't have named it Code Nemo? He got lost too, but at least there was a happy ending




posted on Nov, 27 2013 @ 01:08 PM
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I worked for a time at Target, and they did have a set of codes because we all communicated via walkies. We used to have "code drills" at our meetings before and after the doors opened. I don't remember exactly what the codes were because it's been at least 10 years, but they were similar to what you list and for similar circumstances - fire, lost/missing/abducted child, etc.




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