It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Who ISN'T a charlatan in the "UFO community"?

page: 4
10
<< 1  2  3   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 08:09 AM
link   
Ofcourse there is more than too many people out there using it to make money off every conspiracy theory not just UFO's and aliens.

Just the way it goes really...i mean thats my opinion of Alex Jones.

However i do believe some people are telling the truth but the majority are actually just a bit nuts and/or trying to make some money.

For every 1000 storys there is 1 real, thats what i think anyway.

And i do believe in Aliens, but strangly im not too sure about UFO's, i believe in aliens 100% but i also believe maybe 95% of UFO sightings are mistakes or secret/testing aircraft.




posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 10:54 AM
link   
reply to post by rich23
 


I enjoyed your reply.

Yes, I do realise the new age angle is similar to what is given out by Richard Greer. But there is one fundamental difference, which is that while Greer is a very dodgy character that seems right out of cointelpro, the actual experiencer dosen't need to go through Greer or anyone. This is what I think some people didn't realise I was saying. "Go do it yourself". I have and the results were quite interesting. Seclusion and meditation open up the doors of the universe, that's how it's done, and I think the key to seperating the bull from the reality is this self empowerment angle. Those people that just tell you something that empower you should you chose to do it tend to be true, while others that position themselves or their organisations between you and the truth tend to be the psychopathic manipulators.

Psychopathocracy as a word has it's origins in Ponerology, so I can't take credit for it. I believe it's the best angle in understanding the whole NWO conspiracy arc, which is where I think Nick Pope falls, with the hegelian dialetic of problem, reaction and solution used as a form of population control, as a sophistication of stampeeding the herd. In this arc aliens are just another false flag to create fear, using fear to control people and maintain oligarchy.

As for Icke, I think his reptilian angle makes sense as a metaphor for the reptilian mind of the psychopath. He seems to be tapped into some sort of global consciousness stream for his info, so it could be a case he missrepresented the whole reptilian thing, it could be the case he used it to lower his profile and seem crazy so he could spread all the other stuff he says which is mostly true or it could even be the case he's right. My interpretation is that it's a mix of the first and second ideas, that he got the idea out of the information stream he's tapped into, and made it a bit ludicrous so as to be able to say what he says and not be taken seriously enough as to put his life in risk. Over time the ideas solidified and these days he dosen't speak much about the reptilian thing. Take the reptilian thing as the reptilian mind, which we all have and which is determinant in psychopathic behaviour, and Icke's spiel makes even more sense than it does without this element. The bloodlines are historic elitist psychopaths which are internally motivated mostly by their reptilian brain, the crocodile brain stem we all have within us...

[edit on 17-8-2009 by Mindmelding]



posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 12:45 PM
link   
I enjoyed your posts, too, Mindmelding.


Originally posted by Mindmelding
reply to post by rich23
 

Yes, I do realise the new age angle is similar to what is given out by Richard Greer. But there is one fundamental difference, which is that while Greer is a very dodgy character that seems right out of cointelpro


I've noticed that people here are very down on Greer, usually. I'm not sure why people dislike him so much, usually they concentrate on his moneymaking angle. Whatever else one may think about him, I think the disclosure project was a really good idea and there's a lot of testimony now available that there would not otherwise be.

The recent spat with Project Camelot showed (imo) what an absolute dunce that Kerry woman is, and swung my sympathies back towards Greer somewhat. Things I've heard recently, though, do make me wonder about him. If, as you say, he's cointelpro, it's possible the game plan was to do something (disclosure project) that made him seem trustworthy in order to give him some background that would make free energy researchers trust him: he then gets to sweep up lots of people in that field.

Otoh if nothing comes of his free energy project, there's still the possibility that he's sincere but someone else in the project has been nobbled. The talk of bodyguards at Barcelona is disturbing (where's the money coming from for them? as another poster on ATS noted) and it makes me wonder whether they're there to protect Greer or keep him in line.


the actual experiencer dosen't need to go through Greer or anyone. This is what I think some people didn't realise I was saying. "Go do it yourself". I have and the results were quite interesting.


Gotta ask. Have you seen Capturing the Light? If not, you'd really like it.

Sadly, I'm sure you're aware that posting too much about your experiences will bring on attacks from the narrowminded and the pseudoskeptics. There's another thread on here somewhere from a guy who's summoned and filmed ships. You can imagine what the response was.

As I say, I'm not convinced that everyone up there is cool.


Those people that just tell you something that empower you should you chose to do it tend to be true, while others that position themselves or their organisations between you and the truth tend to be the psychopathic manipulators.


Absolutely. Again, though, there are some techniques and knowledge that should only be taught to people who are ready: it's like putting a loaded gun into a child's hands if they're not. I've spent many years practising chi gung and t'ai chi and I know for sure that some of those practices can be extremely damaging if done incorrectly. There's an excellent book by Bill Porter called Road to Heaven: Encounters with Chinese Hermits which has an interview with a blind monk called Master Yuan. There's a photo of him - an old guy but with a lovely smile and strange, shrunken eyes. On p.216 there's this exchange:

Q. What happened to your eyes?

A. Taoist practice can be dangerous. I did something wrong and they went out like a couple of candles.

Ouch. I've always erred on the side of caution with my own practice, not that I'm anywhere near that level. I make very fitful progress and in fact the last few years I've backslid dramatically. Hey ho. Another tale I've heard through an instructor was of someone who found out about sexual chi gung techniques to practise and wound up suffering spontaneous emissons of sperm without any feeling.

So while what you say is a good rule of thumb, I think there can be honourable exceptions. And Taoists only teach people to the level they're ready for.

Psychopathocracy as a word has it's origins in Ponerology,

That is a brilliant link. Thanks for the introduction to the concept. I'm working my way through it.


As for Icke, I think his reptilian angle makes sense as a metaphor for the reptilian mind of the psychopath.


I like that... and it makes me wonder about the word "metaphor".

I used to disdain tales of faeries, djinns and so on, even though I'm convinced that we don't just live in a material universe. Then I read a fascinating book (the title of which escapes me right now) that looked at the famout Conan Doyle faerie photographs as its starting point.

Briefly, and from memory (please forgive any factual errors) there were two small girls who claimed they played with faeries at the bottom of their gardsn, and eventually someone somehow took a photograph. When they grew up, one of them recanted, the other did not. The book develops the idea that these are "extradimensional" (however interpreted) intrusions into our plane, and that in fact they're very common, and are the origin of the phrase genius loci. The book also suggests that the Findhorn community learned to communcate with those "spirits" responsible for plant growth.

The forms people see could be described as "metaphors" rather well, I think. I know this is not what you mean by the word, but it does seem apt for this idea. Particularly so in that the book mentions the account of a psychic who travelled extensively and noted that he tended to see these intrusions/entites in forms that were culturally appropriate to the area they were working in.

My impression is that Icke is sincere about the reptilian thing. One of the things I find very endearing about him is that I don't think he operates on the level of deception you think he may be capable of:


...it could be a case he missrepresented the whole reptilian thing, it could be the case he used it to lower his profile and seem crazy so he could spread all the other stuff he says which is mostly true


It's interesting to me that Icke has never been sued for defamation, even though he accuses specific people at specific dates and times of things like paedophilia, pederasty, and murder. And those people are, without exception, wealthy and powerful enough to mount a libel case in the English legal system

As I've said on another thread, there's enough actionable material in the books that people could sue without ever having to mention the reptilian thing.

One of the stumbling blocks for me is that if the reptilian thing were literally true, surely there would be werelizards in myth as well as werewolves. It seems very odd that there are only very recent accounts of people being shapeshifting reptilians. Unlike, say, UFOs, which clearly go back to Biblical times and beyond. There are plenty of historical accounts and they even turn up in otherwise quite ordinary paintings. Unlike the lizzies.

Except, oddly enough, for the artefacts found in (IIRC) Iraq mid 20th-century, which seem to depict people and lizzies living together in harmony.


Take the reptilian thing as the reptilian mind, which we all have and which is determinant in psychopathic behaviour, and Icke's spiel makes even more sense than it does without this element. The bloodlines are historic elitist psychopaths which are internally motivated mostly by their reptilian brain, the crocodile brain stem we all have within us...


I think you're right... but psychics have reported seeing shadowy reptoid figures "operating" human beings like sock puppets. It's unlikely we'll ever know for sure...



posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 02:46 PM
link   
reply to post by Mindmelding
 


Had some time with the ponerology site, which I think has some useful things to say but doesn't seem to hold out much hope for any therapy from what I can see.

It also takes a very mechanistic approach to what people are: brain lesions are at the root of it all.

As I say, I think there are some very useful things here, but I also think the model espoused by Wilhelm Reich has a great deal of use, although now I come to think of it he treated neurotic rather than psychopathological types.



posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 03:46 PM
link   
reply to post by rich23
 


Ponerology goes deeper than brain legions, hinting at genetics. The real importance of the concept is that it gives a diagnostic process through brain scans that could potentially weed out psychopaths from hierarchical structures. Think about it, if someone shows no emotional response, no empathy, do you really want him to command military? Remember that there is no such thing as pure logic (that's just mathmatics), no human can function adequately without a healthy emotional profile.

I am familiar with Capturing the Light, the Dorothy Izatt story. It's interesting but I find the value in it, as with most ufo accounts is in motivating one to search for contact independently. If one is healthy, emotionally stable and has meditated enough to realise that there is a connection to the whole, there is no reason one can't contact ET's. Or transdimensionals. Or other elevated humans. I'm not sure where the path leads, the only way to be sure is to walk it. I don't buy into the fearmongering regarding meditation techniques, they are memes disseminated mostly by people who don't wan't the spiritual elevation of mankind, mostly because in one form or another they are parasites of a spiritually atrophiated humanity. In this category we have our economic elites, organised religion, government, etc. None of these people, who are clearly materialists, would survive in a world populated by spiritually enlightened people, people who are in tune with the earth and the cosmos and, ultimately, themselves. They could not be parasitised.



posted on Aug, 17 2009 @ 07:58 PM
link   
Good replies, you deserved the applause Internos gave you!


Originally posted by rich23

Originally posted by Arbitrageur
I have to say I'm still looking for ANY proof that UFOs are extraterrestrial, so far I haven't found it.


I think you're framing the question incorrectly here.
I was responding to someone else's use of the word proof, so I kept the framing the other person used consistent for my reply.


I would say that "evidence" is a better word in your sentence.
Now I think that there's actually plenty of evidence about, and for me at least, the Socorro sighting is particularly convincing....

Attempts to link this to testing of unconventional aircraft are, for me, very unconvincing.

What does that leave?

Sure there's evidence. But what does the evidence tell us? The Socorro case is interesting and unexplained, and I agree it's not conventional aircraft. But that leaves several explanations. Secret projects that nobody wanted to admit to would be one possible explanation.

Another could be time travelers from future earth. From our limited understanding of physics, we already know theoretically how some time travel is possible, and it may be easier than interstellar travel. I'm not saying I think it was time travelers, just that such an explanation would be at least as likely if not more likely than aliens.


I watched the Carl Sagan video. Now he's an interesting guy, and as you say, pretty smart. .....

Now examining the argument in the video. The narrative mentions "God's quarantine", the speed of light. Sorry, but I have never believed that nonsense.


Certainly our understanding of the universe is subject to change as we learn more. But I think characterizing it as nonsense is a bit extreme. There is experimental evidence to confirm much of the speed of light limit, unlike the analogy you gave about people believing traveling fast would suck the air out of your lungs. But I agree with you and Michio Kaku that a civilization much more advanced is sure to know way more than we do. Whether faster than light travel is among that knowledge is a valid point on which to speculate, but at this point it is just speculation.


Now Sagan is a big, big fan (or so it would seem from his public pronouncements) of the fallacy of personal incredulity. Witness the number of people happy to quote his saying "extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof/evidence". (I've seen both attributed to him: I'd like to think he originally said evidence for reasons mentioned earlier in the post.)

This is clearly a restatement of the argument of personal incredulity, and Sagan's assessment of the situation in the video is based entirely on personal incredulity, rather than logic or evidence. He simply cannot believe that lots of alien civilisations are visiting us.


The main reason I posted the video here was to support the religious aspect of ufology. Yes the personal incredulity of the frequency of visits is a logical fallacy, but I don't think that's all he's basing his opinion on, nor is it all I'm basing my opinion on.


We can, I think, safely remove the assumption that travel times would have to be measured in decades.
It's certainly a valid point for speculation, but if the assumption is removed, I wouldn't characterize the removal as being "safely removed", but rather "speculatively removed". I think you're commiting some logical fallacies of your own by "safely removing" such an assumption.


I do think that Sagan has a point about many people finding ETs a substitute for God. But he characterises everyone who thinks at least some UFOs are extraterrestrial in nature as being desperate people who want the ETs to step in and sort us out. That's clearly an unfair generalisation and I'm sure there are plenty of people like myself who are simply convinced that something is going on and would like very much to know what that something is.

I'm with you on that, I'm looking for real ET evidence, not a substitute for religion. He DID generalize about the contactees, but not as much about people that "saw something flying overhead they don't understand" where he left the door open for people like you and me that are not in it for the religion.


I was leafing through one of his books in a bookstore one day (it might even have been Demon-Haunted World and there was something in it that really made me sit up. Damned if I can remember what it was, but it was just hugely out of place and made me think, ok, that guy definitely knows more than he's saying.


Sounds interesting, let me know if you remember it, I'd be interested in checking that out.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 12:23 AM
link   

Originally posted by rich23
If you haven't yet seen Capturing The Light (to date my very favourite UFO documentary ever) then I think you'd really, really like it. It's possible to go to one of those naughty file-sharing torrent sites and find it. WELL worth the effort.


I just watched Capturing the Light and I never saw a single UFO.

It's obvious by the way those lights track each other that the anomalous frames are extended exposures of the ordinary lights. See this screenshot from the video:



The experiment where she filmed with 3 different cameras was a joke. None of those clips showed the same result as the anomalous overexposed frames, so rather than proving she was capturing the effect with multiple cameras, that experiment showed to me that she was UNABLE to duplicate effects as in that screenshot with all 3 cameras. What would have made more sense is if she had 2 or 3 cameras running at the same time, and then the 2-3 cameras all filmed the same anomalous event.

Also a joke was the statement that a guy can tell if a camera is working by taking it apart and putting it back together. The final proof of how well a camera is working is the film it makes.

The only thing I DON'T know is whether the overexposed frames were accidental due to a camera malfunction, or whether it was intentional on her part. But it's quite clear that the frames are due to overexposure from either intentional or unintentional causes. The so called "experts" who failed to recognize this are disappointing, however if they found experts who realized what is really going on here then it wouldn't make as good a documentary in favor of this misinterpreted footage. My guess is if they went to real experts, the real experts would have instantly figured this out, so they either didn't go to real experts in photography, or if they did, they chose to not include their testimony which would make the producers of this documentary charlatans in my opinion.

The film claimed she didn't have anything to prove, but in her interview, she said she DID have something to prove. Before she started filming, her family members didn't believe her. So she actually started filming to convince her family members she wasn't crazy. So the documentary gives her a strong motive to cheat, and the IQ test she took showed she's probably smart enough to figure out how to cheat. But I'm not sure if she did, or if it's a camera problem.

If everything in that movie is accurate then this is perhaps one of the most easily explained cases I've ever seen.

It was worth the effort more for a study in psychology, just as Carl Sagan said, than in any study in ufology since the film contains no UFOs, which is really a disappointment when someone tells me this is their favorite documentary ever of UFOs.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 12:56 AM
link   
I'm a little disappointed the following names haven't been mentioned yet:

  • Brad Sparks
  • Leslie Kean
  • Dr. James McDonald
  • Allan Hendry
  • Dr. Lincoln LaPaz
  • Richard Hall
  • Dr. Robert M. Wood



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 07:30 AM
link   
reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


I have to disagree about Capturing the Light.

this is a grandmother using a hand-held super 8 camera which produces films in which single, individual frames show extraordinary movement. There's even a single frame where the lights write her name, "Dorothy, Dorothy, Dorothy".

After many years of reading on the subject, I'm comfortable with the idea that this kind of weirdness is absolutely part and parcel of the UFO phenomenon, and to reject those cases simply because you find them incredible is bias.

I certainly don't think she's capable of faking them, there's no indication that she has either the interest or the technical ability to fake them, and the guy from ILM who said it would take a lot of time, effort, and skill to produce these results made a lot of sense to me. Just because she's smart - and I think she is - it doesn't mean she has either the interest or the technical skills to produce that kind of extraordinary fakery.

If it's that easy to fake, how would you do it? Remember she's been doing this for 30 years, even her family don't believe her... if they thought she was popping off to a film lab or working away on a computer to come up with the fakery, don't you think they'd have spilled their guts to the documentary makers about it?

I simply don't find it credible that she's a faker. The alternative is that she's telling it like it is, and the evidence points that way.

I also found the interview with the daughter fascinating. Now hitherto I've been really sniffy about the orbs thing, it's all a bit OMG OMG for my tastes... but that interview with the daughter changed my mind. You see her visibly relax when the orb enters her throat.

And of course, when they play back the interview and there are lights visible through the window behind her, the most skeptical of her relatives immediately drives off to see if he can produce the same effect with car lights. But there's no road visible from that window, and he can't produce the result, much to his annoyance.

The alternative is that the documentary makers were in on it and the whole thing's just one big hoax. If so... the acting's better than I've ever seen and everyone in that film deserves an Oscar.

I don't have any problems with psychic phenomena, and a paradigm shift in mainstream science to encompass it is, I think, vital for us to make progress in terms of discovering how the universe, and human beings, work. I've had more than enough experiences through t'ai chi and meditation that forced me off the fence on this issue. (For a long time practicing t'ai chi I took a really agnostic attitude to whether chi was real or just a convenient metaphor.) I'm not looking to convince anyone necessarily, but I'm very, very certain that chi is real, that mind-to-mind communication is possible, and that mainstream science needs to stop running away from these facts and embrace them in order to grow.

I also get cross with people who suggest I'm either deluded or lying when I say this kind of thing.

Now I don't want to second-guess motives for ETs turning up in the wilds of Canada just to communicate with a granny... but one possible scenario is that they're looking to do a little disclosure of their own, and gentle us into the idea that they're out there, despite all the official denials. I rather think (jmo) that they do it simply because they like her, that she puts out some sort of vibe that they find endearing (she certainly charms me), and that she's one subject in a wider programme of contact with individuals outside the power structure.

As mindmelding said, why would any spiritually evolved species want to plug into the psychopathocracy?



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 08:32 AM
link   

Originally posted by Mindmelding
Ponerology goes deeper than brain legions, hinting at genetics.


Uh-oh. Can of worms ahoy. Eugenics, anyone? I'm only saying that that's one of the arguments that will first come up, I'm not saying that I disagree, necessarily.


The real importance of the concept is that it gives a diagnostic process through brain scans that could potentially weed out psychopaths from hierarchical structures.


Are there not relatively reliable (and much cheaper) psychological tests that can do the same thing?


I don't buy into the fearmongering regarding meditation techniques, they are memes disseminated mostly by people who don't wan't the spiritual elevation of mankind,


I understand what you're saying but for me it skirts perilously close to a New Agey "energy is brilliant!" attitude which I think is inaccurate. The tradition I've had most contact with is Taoism, and they're certainly not interested in either proselytising or controlling people. The guy who's taught most of my teachers, and with whom I did a fantastic chi gung week, is called Bruce Frantzis. He's a master of more martial arts than you can shake a stick at, he's fully qualified in traditional Chines medicine (so, acupuncture, acupressure, moxibustion, tui na, and other techniques), and he's the only westerner to become a lineage holder. He's generous with his knowledge, he's certainly NOT a fearmonger, but the reality of the situation is that there are practices which can do all sorts of harm unless done under close supervision. It's just a fact.

Bruce himself says that in his fighting days he was interested in a technique that allowed you to break bones with an open-handed slap. He sought out a master who could teach the technique, practised like mad, and mastered it. Yet one day, he was sparring, and found he was using the technique without compunction, breaking people's arms left right and centre. He realised that the practice had, as a by-product, removed empathy and compassion from his nature, and immediately stopped the practice. Some time later he revisited the master and found that the guy was subtly psychopathic, which he'd overlooked in his eagerness to master every fighting technuque available.

Taoists have used mastery of chi for both healing and fighting purposes. It's very powerful, and I'm afraid that ignoring possible dangers is foolhardy. It's not fearmongering. I was in conversation with a Christian about t'ai chi and he characterised it as "consorting with devils". That's fearmongering.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 10:44 AM
link   
reply to post by rich23
 


We have eugenics now, and they're the ones behind it. No, what ponerology would allow would be a diagnostic process. And it's not expensive to put a ceo or president or prime minister or even royalty past a a few neurological and behaviour tests, when we consider the price that is paid for not doing it. We are paying that price now. Besides, I've never been one to let a price tag stop me from saying something has to be done. If it has to be done money is irrelevant, people will do it even for free if they realise the necessity.

Back to the energy thing. This is my take, a work in progress and I'm an independent. I reserve the right to change my opinion down the line, but for now this is what my personal experiences, which I won't detail, have taught me:

We live in a universe which is made of energy, which vibrates to become information, to manifest form. Our thoughts, and more specifically our emotions, are consciousness manipulating energy. If we love we have a positive creational energy, if we fear (in it's many forms) we have a net energy loss, entropy. If someone is pure of heart, they can meditate without fear of being caught up in fear, of manifesting negative energy. This is why I don't follow your warnings, because I know that, at the root of the fractal, it's just a manifestation of emotion. And emotion will manifest itself in one's life, if one loves there will be many positives, if one fears there will be many negatives. I've never had an abduction or negative ufo or paranormal experience and don't really expect I will because I simply don't put out fear, I'm not entropic. Martial arts isn't the place the perfect this, I know as I've done them too, try farming


The above also helps to understand the psychopath. They are fear based. It also hints at a possible cure, if a technique can be found to open up whatever energy blockage keeps them from feeling normal human emotions they could be snapped back into normal behaviour patterns. Perhaps some masters should meditate on this one for a while?

Peace friend.

[edit on 18-8-2009 by Mindmelding]



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 11:18 AM
link   
reply to post by Mindmelding
 


I don't disagree with anything you've found out from your personal experiences, and I'm glad that you're very positive about this. However, there are specific, and highly effective, techniques that Taoism has to offer that, if practised incorrectly, can do damage, both physical and mental.

I'm not telling you to not do what you're doing - I don't know exactly what that is. Meditation is a grotesquely large catch-all phrase for a wide variety of techniques. However, the Taoist approach is that one should work from the ground up, through eight levels. With t'ai chi and ba gua you strengthen your physical body first and begin clearing out blockages in the "biological chi" body. Chi gung continues this process and refines it through the emotional and intellectual bodies. They advise that considerable progress should be made before operating at the next, psychic, level, because at this level one can be flooded with all sorts of information, some of which is true and some not. By clearing blockages in one's emotional and intellectual bodies, you have a chance of being able to tell the real from the fake.

They also consider that unless you have your "lower" bodies sorted out, operating with more rarefied energies can destabilise you. They've been doing this stuff for about 4,000 years and they do know what they're talking about. It seems sensible to me, and it's the path I follow, however fitfully.

A little while ago, and entirely out of practice with the t'ai chi side of things, I tried doing some meditation for peace. I started getting rather worrying pains around my heart, so I'm going back and trying to get myself fit before I try again.

But hey, everyone has their own path to follow.



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 11:40 AM
link   
reply to post by rich23
 


Think about what I said on the post above.

You're manifesting fear. Perhaps that is why the heart hurt? And there really is no need to do that, because the people that do get hurt with this practice do so because they chose that manifestation themselves. For a pure heart there is nothing to be worried about.

Yes, everyone has their own path. Don't dissuade them from it...



posted on Aug, 18 2009 @ 02:31 PM
link   

Originally posted by rich23
I have to disagree about Capturing the Light.

this is a grandmother using a hand-held super 8 camera which produces films in which single, individual frames show extraordinary movement. There's even a single frame where the lights write her name, "Dorothy, Dorothy, Dorothy".

After many years of reading on the subject, I'm comfortable with the idea that this kind of weirdness is absolutely part and parcel of the UFO phenomenon, and to reject those cases simply because you find them incredible is bias.


I don't find it incredible. What I do find is a well known optical phenomenon exhibited in many of those single frames, namely stationary lights all moving in unison due to camera shake (from not using a tripod on a time exposure). In the screenshot I posted, a photographic analyst can tell you the movement of those 3 lights is apparently caused by camera shake on a prolonged exposure.

As for doing this with CGI, those guys charge $300 an hour or so, so I imagine it would be expensive, however she didn't use CGI. It's a simple prolonged exposure, I would do any of those effects for $200 per frame using her camera, on a single frame, no problem, and I'd be robbing them at that because it only takes 5 mintes per frame, but hey, I don't work for free and neither do the CGI guys. Writing someones name would be very easy, just leave the shutter open on a single frame and write it.

I'm not going to hijack this thread to discuss one incident where it's apparent I won't convince you it's the worst documentary ever made, and you won't convince me it's the best documentary ever made, so we'll have to just agree to disagree. I do think the producers are probably charlatans for promoting this well-known optical effect which doesn't contain any UFOs as a "UFO", enough said.


Originally posted by Xtraeme
I'm a little disappointed the following names haven't been mentioned yet:

  • Brad Sparks
  • Leslie Kean
  • Dr. James McDonald
  • Allan Hendry
  • Dr. Lincoln LaPaz
  • Richard Hall
  • Dr. Robert M. Wood


Well at least you mentioned them! Thanks for the tips, I'm looking for reliable researchers, I'll check these folks out. I've been impressed by your posts in other threads, so I suspect they will be worth looking at.



posted on Aug, 19 2009 @ 05:49 AM
link   
Hey.....

If I nominate the ATS guys (you know, Springer, Crakuer, SO, JA, etc...), do you think I might get some extra points?



posted on Aug, 21 2009 @ 12:54 PM
link   

Originally posted by internos
reply to post by ZombieOctopus
 



Vicente-Juan Ballester Olmos is some GREAT researcher, he never lied.

Josef Allen Hynek has been probably one of the best if not the best researcher: but he passed away in 1986.

Kentaro Mori is another good researcher.



Hi everyone,

I would add Dr Haines & Ted Roe from NARCAP :
A good exemple of NARCAP's reports : www.narcap.org...

I would also add to the list :

David Clarke : www.uk-ufo.org...
Jean-François Baure : www.rr0.org...
Paul Fuller : www.rr0.org...
Martin Shough : www.rr0.org...

One of their reports here :

www.guernsey.uk-ufo.org...

And off course, I would add you Internos, as I totally trust you.

Cheers,
Europa aka Buckwild

[edit on 21-8-2009 by Europa733]



new topics

top topics



 
10
<< 1  2  3   >>

log in

join