The Secret Pyramid Shafts Being Explored Now.

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posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 07:59 AM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 


That video has 2 parts worth watching, it runs through an excellent theory on the plans and schematics of the GP and you see the holes attributed to the surveying. And how the plans were multi layered for interior and exterior....
You also see worker Graffiti and prayers for Khufu throughout the pyramid interior laid by the very hands at construction dispelling theory there is not ANY markings attributed to the pharoah. They are in the same red markings as the building lines....anyhoo I hope peeps enjoy a non sensationalised version on how they were built, but as always are welcome to disagree...


Edit to add part 2 of video


[edit on 16-8-2009 by zazzafrazz]




posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 08:11 AM
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Are these shafts really "secret" (i.e. were they meant to be hidden from future explorers or vandals), or are they simply unexplored so far?
Sorry, not trying to b pedantic, I really don't know which is it, but it would be an important difference of purpose.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 08:43 AM
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Originally posted by Just Cause

Most if not all seats in statues and diagrams of the day support the entire human's back. This guy must be a giant among men (or not human at all) and sitting in a normal human's chair or thrown. At least 7.5ft tall



This is not quite correct, here you can see King Khasekhemwy sitting on a similar throne with a low back:

en.wikipedia.org...


This statue of Khasekhemwy with the Upper Egypt's crown represents the royal statuary of the earliest periods. It remains modest in scale but highly accomplished in craftsmanship anticipating the level of technical perfection attained by the end of the Second Dynasty. The king is seated here upon a throne with a low back and around the base there are incised figures and numbers (47209) of enemies or rebels from Lower Egypt which the king had killed.

www.egyptianmuseum.gov.eg...

Another example, the goddess Isis represented in human form, sitting on a similar throne with a low back:
www.egyptianmuseum.gov.eg...



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 09:01 AM
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I've been curious about the great pyramid, along with countless others, for a long time. Being neither an expert on it or Egyptian religion or culture I still find questions about it.
The things that stick out in my mind the most are why was Kufu's name only recorded once, by laborers in the red marking paint in an obscure place in the top of the burial chamber and no paintings and such in the King's chamber.

No lid to the sarcophagus, no statues and no lesser items like beer jars and such.

Basically, empty rooms. I would think that if, being built in a mere fourteen years, that the chambers would have been painted and prepared even before the top was completed so as to save time and ensure it's readiness for it's occupant.

The whole thing just goes against itself. It doesn't fit the model of why they built these tombs to begin with. Even if the King had been moved by his own people for security concerns or robbed by ancient thieves. No where had everything been removed from a tomb.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 09:11 AM
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reply to post by Tinman67
 


Yea... who would have taken the inscriptions and hieroglyphics off the interior walls? Don't tell me they used those (like the outer casing) to build Ciro too.

[edit on 8/16/2009 by Larryman]



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 09:19 AM
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Originally posted by JayinAR
reply to post by Pathos
 


I see what you're saying, but I don't quite follow, if you follow.

I think you are right about them being plugs. I think that when the blocks are opened, you will see a larger shaft on the other side. Just like a plug.

That being said, I don't see how the grooves got on the INSIDE of the shaft, as lowering a plug would require support from the OUTSIDE.

But I like your thinking. And I'm just speculating. So...who knows?

Let me try to clarify what I said:

First, the workers put those plugs (doors) into place. They may have used a pole and string method to guide them down. Since there are groves on the walls, the plugs would fit into the ducts like a puzzle. Once they hit the end of the groves, the plugs would snap into place.

Second, the workers would place the sandstone into place. On the back of the sandstone, they developed supports to fit into the ducts. Think about the supports as tent poles. Instead of being separate pieces, they were originally fused to the cover stones. As one set of workers held the main sandstone, other workers glided the attached poles into the groves.

Plugs (The Small Doors)
Were used to prevent debris from getting into the pyramid. As the supports were guided into place, during a test run, the designers may have noticed debris falling into the pyramid. There solution may have been those plugs (little doors).

I'm just speculating as well. It would be funny to find out that they were a plumbing system. Hehehe...



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 09:35 AM
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Question for our Egypt experts. Was the lone sarcophagus found in the Kings chamber built into the chamber, as in part of the stone making up the floor or was it a made of a single block in and of itself?

Second has anyone seen anything about the possibility of stone panels that would have been attached to the walls?

I'm going to do some research on my own, but if someone has any answers independently, please let me know.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 10:22 AM
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Originally posted by Tinman67
Question for our Egypt experts. Was the lone sarcophagus found in the Kings chamber built into the chamber, as in part of the stone making up the floor or was it a made of a single block in and of itself?

Second has anyone seen anything about the possibility of stone panels that would have been attached to the walls?

I'm going to do some research on my own, but if someone has any answers independently, please let me know.


Hiya, the 'sarcophagus' was made of one block of granite. It's thought that it was put there as the pyramid was being built. It's a nondescript item, weighing almost 4 tons and poorly made. Some Egypt experts think it was a last minute rush job. Saw marks are still visible where they would usually have been rubbed away with sand. I also 'think' the drill marks are vaguely visible on the floor of the interior.

In regards to stone panels, no record of such being there. It's pretty standard across the 100 plus pyramids in Egypt (Giza, Dashur etc) that they are plain, unmarked and without internal decoration.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 11:07 AM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 


"It's pretty standard across the 100 plus pyramids in Egypt (Giza, Dashur etc) that they are plain, unmarked and without internal decoration."

If the Pharaoh's pyramid tombs are un-decorated inside, then why all the elaborate interior decoration for those same Pharaohs in their new tombs in the Valley of the Kings? If the religion reguires it in the Valley of the Kings... then it would also have been required in the earlier pyramid tombs.

[edit on 8/16/2009 by Larryman]



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 11:07 AM
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reply to post by Pathos
 


Yeah, I understand what you are saying. And it is a good idea. I mean, you would need to have some sort of support system in place when you are "siding" the pyramid, but two things.
1) The grooves are on the wrong side of the plug. Where the plug is is where the grooves would have stopped. However, in the video we see grooves leading UP TO it from below.
2) The shafts are only there, as far as we know, on two sides. Where are the supports for the other two?



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 11:09 AM
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reply to post by Tinman67
 


The outside definately had stone panels, or casing stones.
I have never heard anything about this being the case on the inside. Except maybe in the antechamber. (Edit - Or the Grand Gallery, rather)

[edit on 16-8-2009 by JayinAR]



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 11:11 AM
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I haven't yet seen all of the information and speculation on these supposed ventilation shafts, but they do look pretty clean like they were applied like a drywall finisher. Since there are only a couple mentioned, I would think these may have also been used as if some type of fulcrum leverage system originally


These may have even been much larger openings and finished off with these. The apparent lack of wear patterns, suggests these shafts, as they now appear, were finishing blocks or tiles, like the ones on the outer walls. Another word is conduit, That could be used for many things; air water, even for conversations and orders. How well would sound travel in a shaft like this? Maybe it was partly for security also.

My thoughts are that the top or attic of the pyramid has an area like the suggested library and tomb. Upper levels might have been thought of as more secure from moisture and flooding, which makes me think about a library or even a second or duplicate library. The lower one as if possibly the underworld library.

The myths and stories of heaven and hell could be represented this way in the pyramid. Many libraries have had more than one floor and based on subject material.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 11:24 AM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 





It's a nondescript item, weighing almost 4 tons and poorly made.


I disagree quite strongly here.
In fact, the 'sarcophagus' is a staggering engineering feat in an of itself considering the time in which it was built.
It is presumbed to have been hollowed with tubular drills, yet none have been found.

It's internal volume is exactly HALF the external volume and it is exactly one inch too wide to fit through the door into the chamber. Maybe of some interest to some folks, the length of the interior measures 6'6.6".

In order to cut the granite from the quary, it is presumed that a long saw of at least 8' in length was required. Bronze would have been the metal with inserted 'cutting points' of a harder jewel.
Diamonds..
Of which there aren't any any where near Egypt.

PS- What the Sarcophagus shows is that way back in the day, 4,500 years ago, the neo-historic civilization had devoloped a way of cutting, with ease, some of the hardest stones on the planet. Look at the Diorite bowls Petrie found with engraved heiroglyphs on them. Diorite is harder than iron. Yet they were able to engrave lines that were only 1/150th of an inch wide in them. As if it were a needle of incredible strength.


[edit on 16-8-2009 by JayinAR]



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 11:29 AM
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Has anyone ever moved that 4-ton sarcophagus to see if there might be a floor opening beneath it?



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by Larryman
 


I'm not sure if you COULD move it.
You would need some serious equipment and there are a few tight squeezes along the way.
Nah, it was built right where it is today and it isn't going anywhere.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 11:38 AM
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Originally posted by JayinAR
reply to post by Larryman
 


I'm not sure if you COULD move it.
You would need some serious equipment and there are a few tight squeezes along the way.
Nah, it was built right where it is today and it isn't going anywhere.


Four Hydrolic jacks (one on each corner) could lift it for a look-see under it. And maybe find a squashed bug under it to carbon-date.

[edit on 8/16/2009 by Larryman]



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 11:40 AM
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reply to post by Larryman
 


Good luck getting the jacks underneath it.
I think you would have to slide it.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 
Hiya J, we'll have to agree to disagree on the sarcophagus. Check out this page at Hall of Maat! Let me know what you think?



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 11:46 AM
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Originally posted by Larryman
Has anyone ever moved that 4-ton sarcophagus to see if there might be a floor opening beneath it?


It would've been the first thing looters would do. If we can think of it, thieves and experts have already done it.



posted on Aug, 16 2009 @ 11:55 AM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 


Thanks for the info!
Later, when I get back from the in-laws, I'll run through the site's categorization and compare them to the specific rock in question.

However, to use as a comparison, and perhaps an example of what I mean, I took this from wiki on diorite...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Diorite is an extremely hard rock, making it difficult to carve and work with. It is so hard that ancient civilizations (such as Ancient Egypt) used diorite balls to work granite. "
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I hope the site can explain how heiroglyphs were carved only 1/150th of an inch wide on something that is hard enough to work granite. (From the same period)

Thanks again for the info.

[edit on 16-8-2009 by JayinAR]





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