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Buddhist Temples

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posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 10:47 AM
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Does anyone know of any buddhist temples in the U.S.A. where you can live there and dedicate your life to being a buddhist monk?




posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 10:50 AM
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reply to post by 4stral4pprentice
 



Check out these links... they may help.

thaiembdc.org...

answers.yahoo.com...



posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 10:59 AM
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Everytime I hear about Buddhist Temples, I think of Algore trying to raise money off of them.

If they have access to that kind of money, it might turn out to be a good career move.



posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 11:31 AM
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Originally posted by RRconservative
Everytime I hear about Buddhist Temples, I think of Algore trying to raise money off of them.

If they have access to that kind of money, it might turn out to be a good career move.


money? lol. No, no you got it all wrong, what i mean is to live their and tend for the temple and live my life out on the path as a buddhist monk. i have no intention to go there to make a career out of it.



posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 11:33 AM
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Hello 4stral4pprentice!

Here is a list of links for You. These are in the Northern California Area.

Shasta Abbey

Tendai Buddhist Monastery

Abhaya Buddhist Monastery

Koyasan Buddhist Monastery

In Lovingkindness

Om Mani Padme Hum

=)Namaste

Erik

[edit on 22/AugamWed, 12 Aug 2009 11:34:21 -0500/08 by redwoodjedi]



posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 11:50 AM
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Originally posted by redwoodjedi
Hello 4stral4pprentice!

Here is a list of links for You. These are in the Northern California Area.

Shasta Abbey

Tendai Buddhist Monastery

Abhaya Buddhist Monastery

Koyasan Buddhist Monastery

In Lovingkindness

Om Mani Padme Hum

=)Namaste

Erik

[edit on 22/AugamWed, 12 Aug 2009 11:34:21 -0500/08 by redwoodjedi]


Which one practices Theravada Buddhism? and is the only significant difference between Mahayana and Theravada that Theravada believes you cant be reborn after youved attained perfect enlightenment?



posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 12:01 PM
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Originally posted by 4stral4pprentice

Originally posted by redwoodjedi
Hello 4stral4pprentice!

Here is a list of links for You. These are in the Northern California Area.

Shasta Abbey

Tendai Buddhist Monastery

Abhaya Buddhist Monastery

Koyasan Buddhist Monastery

In Lovingkindness

Om Mani Padme Hum

=)Namaste

Erik

[edit on 22/AugamWed, 12 Aug 2009 11:34:21 -0500/08 by redwoodjedi]


Which one practices Theravada Buddhism? and is the only significant difference between Mahayana and Theravada that Theravada believes you cant be reborn after youved attained perfect enlightenment?


Hello Again!

I am not entirely sure which Monastery practices what vehicle. I am a Rinzai Zen practitioner myself and therefore I am not educated or knowledgable in the Tibetan schools enough to hedge an accurate answer to your quiry. I apologize. I would assume that the predominate vehicle of practice would be outlined in some sort of manifest outlined on each Monastery's website.

In Lovingkindness

=)Namaste

Erik



posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 12:12 PM
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Well i do believe there is a very good chance that i will go there and dedicate my life to becoming a monk, and living my eternal life in this path.



posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 12:17 PM
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I have visited this Zen Moutian Retreat before and some students lived there.
I think they were considered Monks.

Nice place but I don't know if it's your flavor of Buddhism.
As a matter of fact I saw the meteor showers there, which were today. Odd timing.

www.zmc.org...

California mountains above Palm Springs.

typo

[edit on 12-8-2009 by cindymars]



posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 12:28 PM
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Originally posted by cindymars
I have visited theis Zen Moutian Retreat before and some students lived there.
I think they were considered Monks.

Nice place but I don't know if it's your flavor of Buddhism.
As a matter of fact I saw the meteor showers there, which were today. Odd timing.

www.zmc.org...

California mountains above Palm Springs.


What would my flavor be then? lol, i probably will visit the California Tendai Buddhist Monastery regardless as even if its not my flavor, it will still be progress.



posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 12:32 PM
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You know i could just go to a bunch of different monastery's through out the world, that would be my taste. I like to keep a open mind to everything and not just one set path, that would only limit myself.



posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 12:55 PM
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Originally posted by 4stral4pprentice

Originally posted by cindymars
I have visited theis Zen Moutian Retreat before and some students lived there.
I think they were considered Monks.

Nice place but I don't know if it's your flavor of Buddhism.
As a matter of fact I saw the meteor showers there, which were today. Odd timing.

www.zmc.org...

California mountains above Palm Springs.


What would my flavor be then? lol, i probably will visit the California Tendai Buddhist Monastery regardless as even if its not my flavor, it will still be progress.


You had ask this:
Which one practices Theravada Buddhism?
I could not recall Theravada so I just said flavor.

Travelling to different Temples would be cool, I am sure you will find your home.
I wish you the best.



posted on Aug, 13 2009 @ 12:49 PM
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Originally posted by cindymars

Originally posted by 4stral4pprentice

Originally posted by cindymars
I have visited theis Zen Moutian Retreat before and some students lived there.
I think they were considered Monks.

Nice place but I don't know if it's your flavor of Buddhism.
As a matter of fact I saw the meteor showers there, which were today. Odd timing.

www.zmc.org...

California mountains above Palm Springs.


What would my flavor be then? lol, i probably will visit the California Tendai Buddhist Monastery regardless as even if its not my flavor, it will still be progress.


You had ask this:
Which one practices Theravada Buddhism?
I could not recall Theravada so I just said flavor.

Travelling to different Temples would be cool, I am sure you will find your home.
I wish you the best.


I'm always at home.



posted on Aug, 22 2009 @ 03:14 PM
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This is where I studied.... I lived 7mi. from this Zen center for 25 years. A beautiful, spiritual place with natural hot springs down by the river.


www.bmzc.org...



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 11:34 AM
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Ugh, this is not to say I'm lazy but i really hate societies lifestyle, get a job, make money, pay to live somewhere. Why can't i live off the land? Grow my own food, find my own food, make my own shelter, travel across the world. But really, whose stopping me but myself from doing this?

Also It seems a lot of Buddhist places or monastery's don't speak English!! URG!! Are there seriously! only like 4 or 5 Buddhist temples in the U.S.A that speak English, come on.



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 12:59 PM
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Arizona Buddhist Centers

Here is a list of Temples, Centers, and Sanghas in Arizona

There is a theraveda (Maha Nikaya) in Tucson. Thich Naht Hanh also has a sangha in Sun City (just northwest of Phoenix).

Hope your journey is fruitful!

Peace



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 02:39 PM
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Originally posted by 4stral4pprentice
Ugh, this is not to say I'm lazy but i really hate societies lifestyle, get a job, make money, pay to live somewhere. Why can't i live off the land? Grow my own food, find my own food, make my own shelter, travel across the world. But really, whose stopping me but myself from doing this?


In a monastery you'll have to work hard and have to keep to a strict schedule of (amongst other things) prayer, meditation. It is expected you live with the other monks and do these things together. Try to do some retreats to see if monastic life is what you expected it to be.

Sounds to me you need to get a job, save some money and buy your own land someday to grow food. No need for living in a monastery.


Which one practices Theravada Buddhism? and is the only significant difference between Mahayana and Theravada that Theravada believes you cant be reborn after youved attained perfect enlightenment?


You really should read the sites first, they say which tradition they follow. I believe you are referring to the bodhisattva (Mahayana) and arhat (Theravada) ideal. A bodhisattva takes rebirth until all sentient beings have achieved enlightenment, postponing their own enlightenment. An arhat strives for his own enlightenment first and when that is achieved it implies such a person would be free from the cycle of rebirth, thus does not take rebirth as a bodhisattva would.



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 05:51 PM
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Originally posted by Dragonfly79

Originally posted by 4stral4pprentice
Ugh, this is not to say I'm lazy but i really hate societies lifestyle, get a job, make money, pay to live somewhere. Why can't i live off the land? Grow my own food, find my own food, make my own shelter, travel across the world. But really, whose stopping me but myself from doing this?


In a monastery you'll have to work hard and have to keep to a strict schedule of (amongst other things) prayer, meditation. It is expected you live with the other monks and do these things together. Try to do some retreats to see if monastic life is what you expected it to be.

Sounds to me you need to get a job, save some money and buy your own land someday to grow food. No need for living in a monastery.


Which one practices Theravada Buddhism? and is the only significant difference between Mahayana and Theravada that Theravada believes you cant be reborn after youved attained perfect enlightenment?


You really should read the sites first, they say which tradition they follow. I believe you are referring to the bodhisattva (Mahayana) and arhat (Theravada) ideal. A bodhisattva takes rebirth until all sentient beings have achieved enlightenment, postponing their own enlightenment. An arhat strives for his own enlightenment first and when that is achieved it implies such a person would be free from the cycle of rebirth, thus does not take rebirth as a bodhisattva would.


A monastic life could be for me but even if it was i would never stay in one area my whole life, also I wouldn't mind if it seems strict with tight schedules, you can always adapt. =) Retreats are things what i have in mind hopefully they last longer then a year but thats just my preference. =)

Secondly I dont know if theres even a form for what my Buddhism beliefs would be called. Since we know little to none about our life after physical death and after the cycle ends who says its not possible to help sentient beings there just as much or more as you could here?? I believe i can strive for my own enlightenment and others at the same time. In my belief were all connected so me and others are one in the same.

[edit on 8-9-2009 by 4stral4pprentice]

[edit on 8-9-2009 by 4stral4pprentice]



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 07:03 PM
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reply to post by 4stral4pprentice
 


Lol, second posts of yours i'm replying to now. What you mentioned there about your own beliefs.. It would be Theravada Buddhism in a sense, but you are right (at least how I see it) as it can only "help" the situation in the universe if you yourself free yourself from the cycles/illusion/hell of it all - it certainly can't hurt or slow down the Bodhisvatta's way.

I used to really like the Mahayana/Bodhisvatta ideal, but I lean more towards Theravada myself now. I don't think every sentient being in the universe is meant to or even wants to be "freed" and it seems quite impossible (once you freed them new ones would be born), everything has it's purpose and it is not the original teachings of Buddha. The Bodhisvatta/ Mahayana ideal was an amendment to original Buddhism. It is an extremely moral path don't get me wrong. I understand the connectedness - their suffering is my suffering and vice versa, while that is true everything in totality is just that, everything. Hard to explain, but I don't have a problem with that, even though there is one apparently.

Just my thoughts, I'm not a practicing Buddhist but have read on it a bit and it's methods and worldview I use to sort of ground myself at times - I just find the question of Mahayana or Theravada is relevant to practically everyone no matter their beliefs or religion. Just adding for discussion, I am no expert on Buddhism so take it for what you will.



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 07:11 PM
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Originally posted by 4stral4pprentice
Ugh, this is not to say I'm lazy but i really hate societies lifestyle, get a job, make money, pay to live somewhere. Why can't i live off the land? Grow my own food, find my own food, make my own shelter, travel across the world. But really, whose stopping me but myself from doing this?


Get book: Chop Wood, Carry Water.

Right Thought. Right Action. Right Livelihood. Right Meditation.


[edit on 8-9-2009 by Chakotay]




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