Is the modern age ending?

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posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 09:22 AM
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I think what's really happening, is not the world ending, but the end of the Modern age and the dawn of the Post-modern age.

This has actually been happening since about 1990, or even as far back as 1980 or 1970. The "old morals" are becoming replaced with the "new morals" of tolerance and "do as ye will, harm none", and the old media is being replaced with the new media of the Internet.

The great nation-states of the 20th century will be replaced by community governments based on commonly accepted human rights.

However, it's been a bumpy road. As things change, people who can't adapt to Postmodernity will feel left behind and upset. The radios will turn off, the TVs will turn off, the dollar won't be worth anything.

The early 2010s represent the true beginning of the Postmodern age; the period of 1990-2009 is the tail end of Modernity.




posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 09:31 AM
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mod·ern (mdrn)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to recent times or the present: modern history.
b. Characteristic or expressive of recent times or the present; contemporary or up-to-date: a modern lifestyle; a modern way of thinking.
2.
a. Of or relating to a recently developed or advanced style, technique, or technology: modern art; modern medicine.
b. Avant-garde; experimental.
3. often Modern Linguistics Of, relating to, or being a living language or group of languages


According to this definition we will always live in the modern age as modern means recent or the present.



posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 09:42 AM
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Terms like these are largely academic labels. As a historian by training, I think of modernity as beginning during the Renaissance. This is "early modern." I think true modernity begins about the time of the French Revolution. What comes after, historically speaking, is "contemporary history," which begins around the time of WWI. It can be argued, however, that we are actually living in the post-postmodern age. I suggest 9/11/01 as the marker date for that. This event signaled the passing of the "short 20th century," (1914-2001) just as we have the "long 19th century" (1789-1914).

Loosely speaking, of course, we use the term "modern" all the time, to distinguish our own time from past eras. But I think your point is valid when talking about the academic idea of "modernity" and what that entails.



posted on Aug, 12 2009 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by CrowServo
Terms like these are largely academic labels. As a historian by training, I think of modernity as beginning during the Renaissance. This is "early modern." I think true modernity begins about the time of the French Revolution. What comes after, historically speaking, is "contemporary history," which begins around the time of WWI. It can be argued, however, that we are actually living in the post-postmodern age. I suggest 9/11/01 as the marker date for that. This event signaled the passing of the "short 20th century," (1914-2001) just as we have the "long 19th century" (1789-1914).

Loosely speaking, of course, we use the term "modern" all the time, to distinguish our own time from past eras. But I think your point is valid when talking about the academic idea of "modernity" and what that entails.


isn't there something of a debate as to if the 20th century proper ended in 1989, 1991, or 2001?





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