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The 10 Mysteries Of Human Behaviour

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posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 11:30 AM
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A very interesting article on the mysteries of human behavior.


Scientists have split the atom, put men on the moon and discovered the DNA of which we are made, but there are 10 key mysteries of human behaviour which they have failed to fully explain.


www.curiousread.com...

Here are a few of the most interesting ones:


1 - Blushing: Charles Darwin struggled to explain why evolution made us turn red when we lie, which alerts others. However, some think it may help diffuse confrontation or foster intimacy by revealing weakness.



8 - Altruism: giving things away with no certain return is odd behaviour in evolutionary terms. It may help with group bonding or simply give pleasure.



6 - Picking your nose: the unappealing but common habit of ingesting 'nasal detritus' offers almost no nutritional benefit, so why do a quarter of teenagers do it, on average four times a day? Some think it boosts the immune system.


www.curiousread.com...




posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 12:56 PM
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reply to post by MastaG
 


Wow that is intersting


its strange how some people think that doing #6 bosts hygine


strange


star and flag



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 12:58 PM
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reply to post by Zeplin100
 


This is already being discussed here:

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Aug, 11 2009 @ 01:56 AM
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Damn, used the search with 4 different keyword groups - didn't come up with that...

My apologies, mods, feel free to close it down.



posted on Aug, 11 2009 @ 03:57 AM
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Originally posted by MastaG
Damn, used the search with 4 different keyword groups - didn't come up with that...
My apologies, mods, feel free to close it down.


Different section and lightly different tone of thread...probably okay to continue.

Altruism is something very interesting. For years psychologists have been determined that there's no such thing. They insisted that, at the very least, it's along the lines of Pavlov's Dog (classical conditioning). Call it wishful thinking, I prefer to believe that some acts of kindness/ charity are made spontaneously or thoughtfully without regard to personal reward. It helps me sleep at night.

A couple of the others are just weird...eating snot? A mystery? Nah...just dirty beggars who should know better. Adolescence? Chimpanzees have it...not sure about other critters. I thought blushing was a sexual 'Go Sign?'

Body hair's been put there by nature to prove to Creationists that Evolution is false. To prove to Interventionists that we are created by aliens. To prove to Evolutionists that we are descended from a common ancestor to primates. To prove to men that some women love it and some don't...a win/lose situation :



posted on Aug, 11 2009 @ 05:50 AM
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Thanks Kandinsky!

Altruism is a very interesting "habit", it's something we do to feel good, but we do expect a reward or a favor afterwards. Maybe altruism does not exist at all, since we're merely trading a favor for a favor, and always expecting something in return. We know that the person we're doing a good thing to will thank us, and tell other people perhaps about how good we are. Very hard to find a truly altruistic person, if one exists.

Mucus is actually present in our digestive system as well.


Digestive system

In the digestive system, mucus is used as a lubricant for materials which must pass over membranes, e.g., food passing down the esophagus. A layer of mucus along the inner walls of the stomach is vital to protect the cell linings of that organ from the highly acidic environment within it. The same protective layer of mucus is what comes out when you sneeze. Mucus does not digest in the intestinal tract, so mucus commonly appears in fecal matter whether its origin is from the intestines, or swallowed.


From Wikipedia

Liked the last part...



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