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The number of THINGS to buy is increasing

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posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 01:57 AM
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Here is another problem I see clearly.
The number of things that a person needs to get to first base is increasing.
You can say these things are not needed, but that is wishful thinking.
I am talking about a cell phone, a computer, an internet provider, etc.
These things never used to exist.
Now they take a major portion of the lower class's money each month.

Remember when the home phone was $19.95? Now the cell phone is $50 at the lowest. You can get the $34.99 plan and with all the taxes and access fees it still ends up being $50 each month. I know people that pay $100 each month just to talk, or even worse to text (a seriously pathetic addiction for a lot of people).

Remember when their was no computer? Now you need one. Plus a laptop. Seriously. You need to be online to run with the pack.

How about the television? It used to be that you would just buy the TV set and that was it. Forever. TV was free.
Now you have to pay serious bucks for the cable and the internet connection. $120 shot right there. Sure, you can sign up for the $49/month introductory offer but when that runs out you pay $120 per month and most people are craving a new flat panel TV also.

Throw in video games and MP3 players.

It is all a bunch of wonderful technology that makes life terrific if you can afford it.
For most people though, they are struggling to stay connected.
And you seriously need to be in the loop or you'll fall further behind.

The bottom line is those with money are running away from the lower class faster and faster. The lower class is trying to keep up and falling further behind. That is why a lot of businesses are having trouble making sales to people that don't have as much left over income each month because they are paying tons of money just to talk, listen and watch passively.

Entertainment is a fantastic slave master. It works really well.











Are you going to eat that last piece of chicken?




posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 02:15 AM
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You're right. But it's not compulsory, of course. And I think right now, people are beginning to question as to whether or not they 'need' or 'want' the consumer goods you mention -- and if they need or want a lot more of the stuff they have lying around.

The questioning is good. It's great. Life's become so messy as result of all this technology. And people are realising it doesn't make them feel good, nor does it improve their lives.

So, round about now and into the future, I suspect 'kewl' people will be those who've jettisoned the 'stuff', who've ditched the drugs, who walk instead of driving, who live very minimalist lives.

The tattooes will go, and the piercings. Kewl will be those who have an air of cleanliness and simplicity about them, who have minimal furniture, who earn enough to live instead of living for the job.

Of course, there will be the usual attempts to ridicule them by those who make their living by pushing 'stuff' -- but this time it's not going to work anywhere near as successfully as it has previously, imo.

We're in the process of scaling down, not that we were ever slaves to consumerism. But the sheer 'weight' of possessions is too heavy and inconvenient. We're going to sell or give much of it away and we're looking forward to returning to the much simpler, cleaner, more relaxed way of life we used to enjoy. We want to be free. I think a lot of people are beginning to feel the same. We want quality, not quantity. Actually, we don't want much at all, just the bare minimum. I'm close to disconnecting my computer, don't watch tv or listen to radio and plan to get rid of at least half of my accumlation of books. My mobile/cell phone is in a drawer somewhere, used it about three times I think then tossed it. Couldn't care less about digital.

Maybe China better scale down its production, lol, because it's looking as if a consumer backlash in occurring and gathering pace.

As the man said, you can only wear one shirt at a time, eat from one plate at a time. We all fell for the 'stuff' and now we've turned against it. And as for 'brand name' rubbish .. forget it. It's in its death throes. And people no longer care what zio-pawn 'celebrities' do or wear any more. People realise now they were duped into copying the Paris Hiltons and Britneys and Beckhams. People have a deep, primal need now to be themselves and to scrap the clutter.



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 02:21 AM
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but most of the things you mentioned are things that everyone could and most people should live without.
don't get me wrong, i like internet. but even that is a luxury, not a necessity by any means.

i think its good people are starting to differentiate between wants and needs, although its unfortunate the way that is occurring.

what I am scared about is that COST of things that people actually DO need to buy...like FOOD.
i could go (and do...gladly) without $60 video games, $50 brainwashing television and a $300 video ipod...

but when it seems food has gotten like a dollar more expensive in what seems like, overnight, thats when i get worried.


[edit on 8/10/2009 by double_frick]



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 02:26 AM
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that should be the first thing you buy

#1 a good pc, that means build it
#2 a xbox360
#3 1080p LCD tv, 42" up

then run over to fileplanet and preorder champions online, take the 6month sub option and you'll get guaranted access to the startrek online closed beta



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 02:31 AM
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reply to post by St Vaast
 

St Vaast, what sort of books have you accumulated?



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 02:39 AM
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reply to post by double_frick
 


Agree wholeheartedly about the global and alarming rise in food prices. Exacerbated of course, at least in this country (Oz) by the monopolisation in the supermarket industry.

But I've noticed SO many others doing what I do now: I buy essentials and choose generic brands.

It's only a few years ago that I used to take the trolley down every aisle and chose brand-name products over generics. My trolley was loaded to the top and over.

Now -- I use a basket, not a trolley.

I know what I want before I enter

I don't go down every aisle or even ever second aisle

I buy daily, buy fresh

Buy far less meat, which is great because I was vegetarian before the childen came along. Now my daughter is strictly vegetarian and the men in the family don't like eating dead animals all that much either, as it turns out

Choose no-frills generic brands

Check the volume on packages (volume is shrinking as the prices rise, if you notice)

Buy necessities in bulk when they're discounted

Ignore the 'rubbish' no-value foods as much as possible, such as chocolates, biscuits, cakes, fancy breads, soft drinks, sugar-filled 'fruit juices', etc.

Compare prices. Walk the extra mile to patronise stand-alone businesses on principle.

And I complain frequently to management about the ridiculous rise in foods, which often occurs twice-weekly in our local supermarket, using the drip-drip, squeaky-wheel philosophy.


Using the above and other methods, I'm actually saving money now on groceries, despite the never-ending price rises. It's become a fun hobby for me to bring the budget in a bit lower each week.

Our local supermarket thought it had a monopoly. It's finding out that people are not a never ending source of money to be held ransom. When I go there now, there are fewer and fewer customers and like me, they have just a few items in baskets.

The supermarket barons will have to quit first. They've sqeezed all the blood they're going to get.

Now they'll have to lower their prices and behave themselves or face closure. Because people are discovering just how little food it actually takes to stay alive. And with the emphasis these days on the dangers of obesity, the food-robber barons are actually doing the populace a favour, because people are deleting junk-food items from the shopping cart, limiting their (expensive) fat and meat consumption and feeling better for it.

People have the power, in the final analysis. The robber barons are in for a lesson.



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 02:45 AM
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Pass me the wings please so I can fly free.
So many I know don't know they know not
the plotting and planning of those who hide behind the curtain
using the slight of hand to make
billions vanish into thin air
Where did it go
don't know thought you had it
No no not me
Wow cool magic
The best part of the trick is reveal it's not coming back
doesn't matter what are the people going to do
absolutely nothing.
time to move on to the next phase of action
they posion the air we breathe and the water we drink
and with a smile on their face ask who's tired relax have a drink and take a 5min breather
Don't want you to get sick
take this shot it will take care of that super bug
oh by the way
did i mention the side effects are more harmful than what we just cured
but we are preventing an outbreak so the end justifies the means
As for the technology
They need it to speed up their process of elimination
So many radio waves slowly cooking the brain
But as long as you can hear me now?
Good
They know there are those of us who are on to them
yet they care not
Cause they know most Americans are weak
Too caught up in their simple priveledged lives
We bomb other countries on a daily basis
but two planes hit a couple of towers and we go diving head first into a recession
Let them fight amongst themselves
makes it that more easier to get away
by the time they realize what happened they will have been left behind
Divide the factions
misdirection
Funny these humans are
Isn't mind manipulation great
They just asked the pedophile to babysit the children
No Michaels dead and gone
get over it.





For those of you who are awake and truly know thy enemy let them live on top of the world but what comes up must come down their time will come and I can't wait to pee on Magog's grave.


Howling At The Moon,
Chaotic Wolf

[edit on 10-8-2009 by chaoticwolf88]



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 02:53 AM
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How about the concept of SHARING? I.e., two or more people agree to split the costs of this stuff and establish time schedules for using it, etc. If one person uses it more, they can pay more, etc.

Then there are carpoolings, potluck dinners, trading minor services ("Ill sweep your driveway if you trim my hedges" or whatever), and so on. There are zillions of small ways to save your pennies by cooperating with your friends and neighbors.

The problem is very few people know enough people around them to make this viable and it seems "freakish" to most people you might suggest it to. Just goes to show how our values of COMMUNITY have complety deterorated. If you can't do EVERYTHING by youself you must be a "loser." What kind of "commie loser" would actually wanna SHARE anything?



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 02:59 AM
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reply to post by THX-1138
 


A lot of them are from the 70s, even the 60s (plus onwards of course).

Many are from the innovative writings of that crop of 60s and 70s authors who explored the paranormal, the UFO phenomenon: authors like Lyall Watson, Colin Wilson, Baigent, Leigh, Tart, Puthoff, Monroe, Harrington, Muldoon, Rogo and many, many others.

Plus lots of non-fiction history, travel, biographies, art, warfare, etc.

I've held onto and increased my book collection for over 40 years. The living room is wall-to-wall cabinetry, filled mostly with books. In the garage are two large cabinets filled to capacity with literally hundreds more. The overflow sits in large 60 litre plastic, lidded containers .. more than 20 of those, plus assorted cartons.

Recently, gave away over 60 cardboard cartons filled with books to charity shops. Some of them I hadn't read. Nearly broke my back, lifting them into the car. In the end, the two charity shops we gave most to, requested we not take any more there because they didn't have room. So then I began filling a pull-along grocery-shopper thing with books a few times a week, which I was putting in the after-hours slot at the local library at a rate of 25 to 30 at a time. I imagined they'd be able to sell them or put some of the really good ones on the shelves. But in the end they saw me and told me off for doing it -- said it created extra work for them. I still slip some in the slot when the library's closed.

But ... have to confess, I can't stop buying books, if they're something I've been after for a long while. For example, T.C. Lethbridge's books are extremely difficult to come by these days. Our local library chain has only one, and that's on a restricted lending basis of 7 days. There are three or four I'd dearly love to have. So I search for them on ebay sometimes. It's nuts, I know. But I'm trying to let-go. It's ridiculous to have this many books. I treasured them more than just about any other consumer item most of my life, but it's time



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 03:11 AM
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Originally posted by St Vaast
Using the above and other methods, I'm actually saving money now on groceries, despite the never-ending price rises. It's become a fun hobby for me to bring the budget in a bit lower each week.


that is sad that i think that is the way it is for most people.
at least for people i know its like a gamble whether there will be any left over at the end of the month, well, its worse for many around me in debt. luckily i dodged that, but some people can barely make ends meet as is, with literally thousands in debt on top of that...i don't know how people are 'expect to survive'

i guess thats where my idea that this monetary system isn't serving us as it SHOULD and we should break it down to begin anew...idealistic, but i am allowed to be since i dont make any life (country/world)altering decisions.

and
silent thunder:
i couldn't agree more, with technology increasing it seems people's sense of community has decreased.
seems now that they've sucessfully decimated the family structure and dynamic as we know it they are going after socializing face to face.


[edit on 8/10/2009 by double_frick]



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 03:16 AM
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You're correct, with the rate of technology these days, I imagine it's difficult for anyone to stay off the bandwagon. However, I think most people would prioritise food on the table over video games and MP3s. These are luxuries, not givens - hell, I knew a kid growing up who's family didn't own a television. Not because they were poor, but because it was purely a lifestyle choice.
I think it really just comes down to commonsense and perspective. From the food you buy in the supermarket, to the privileges you have in your own home. I was raised upon the notion that as long as the family was together, nothing else really mattered.
And that is the truth, I believe.



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 04:58 AM
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I don't understand how an x-box whatever or a 42" plasma screen will help you in any way. That's an investment in long term distraction and detraction from doing anything productive.

I can kinds understand some people having a phone in some instances, but i don't have one. I have no TV, or videogames, (i played xbox one time i think) i do have a PC which i consider an educational tool, as i could never buy or even track down all the books to match what i can read or watch online.

Books, I love and hate books, i love books because reading a real book is just intense, it really takes you into the mind of the author transparently. I hate books because they're usually too short. Something like 20,000 leagues will keep me busy for a few hours if i really get going. I just run out of stuff to read too fast.

I've got an mp3 player, no ipod, that's just a silly thing, i got the cheap one that runs on aaa batteries so i can keep a handful of rechargeables in my backpack and go for a week or two without having to plug into anything.

I'm slowly working my way down to having all of my worldly possessions fit inside my backpack and a large duffle. I'm getting pretty close to that point now.



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 05:02 AM
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Tihs tread is a bit sh!t



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 05:17 AM
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There seems to be an awful lot of "stuff" out there...ever seen those pics of huge parkinglots full of gleaming new BMWs or Toyotas they can't sell? (The techical economic term for this is "overcapacity.") Factory owners are moaning that their shelves are full of stuff they can't get rid of, and they have the capacity to crank it out more than ever. There are emptt homes, empty office space, empty everything everywere, shops full of stuff and no buyers...

Then on the other hand you have a severe recession/depression where people can't get anything at all and are pinching their pennies till they scream.
I know a bit about economics, but let me ask like a "stupid question" like the little boy pointing out that the emperor is naked: How can these two situations exist logically at the same time? How can massive prosperity exist ALONGSIDE desperate poverty? Seems more than a bit bizzare. In the ancient days you had a flood or bad harvest, people starve, OK. That's one thing. But we are not really facing any material shortages...quite the contrary! And yet people are "poorer" than ever. Makes no logical sense.

[edit on 8/10/09 by silent thunder]

[edit on 8/10/09 by silent thunder]



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 08:39 PM
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Originally posted by double_frick
but most of the things you mentioned are things that everyone could and most people should live without.
don't get me wrong, i like internet. but even that is a luxury, not a necessity by any means.

i think its good people are starting to differentiate between wants and needs, although its unfortunate the way that is occurring.

what I am scared about is that COST of things that people actually DO need to buy...like FOOD.
i could go (and do...gladly) without $60 video games, $50 brainwashing television and a $300 video ipod...

but when it seems food has gotten like a dollar more expensive in what seems like, overnight, thats when i get worried.


[edit on 8/10/2009 by double_frick]


For some people, internet is a requirement for their job or schooling. I live far away from my college, and driving back and forth to use the college puters would be a lot more expensive than paying for internet. Some people get by with using college puters though, but they still need the internet for school.



posted on Aug, 10 2009 @ 09:53 PM
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Originally posted by silent thunder
How about the concept of SHARING? I.e., two or more people agree to split the costs of this stuff and establish time schedules for using it, etc. If one person uses it more, they can pay more, etc.

Then there are carpoolings, potluck dinners, trading minor services ("Ill sweep your driveway if you trim my hedges" or whatever), and so on. There are zillions of small ways to save your pennies by cooperating with your friends and neighbors.

The problem is very few people know enough people around them to make this viable and it seems "freakish" to most people you might suggest it to. Just goes to show how our values of COMMUNITY have complety deterorated. If you can't do EVERYTHING by youself you must be a "loser." What kind of "commie loser" would actually wanna SHARE anything?



Not a bad idea there, thunder. My town has lawn care ordinances, so my neighbors and I could co-op the lawn equipment. One buy the mower, one buy the blower, one buy the trimmer. All that crap that sits in your shed, except for a couple hours on saturday, ya know?

How bout if a few of us went together and got interweb, and bought one of those industrial routers, we could all have highspeed for 10-15$ a month. Unless you are on 24-7, you are paying for a lot of usage you never get.

Imagine how many friends you would have if your house was the wi-fi hotspot.

[edit on 10-8-2009 by hotrodturbo7]



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