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Bug out bikes?

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posted on Aug, 14 2009 @ 09:04 AM
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reply to post by Ex_MislTech
 


This looks like a good tire.

20" airfree tire

Has a center rib for low resistance as well as some side lugs for offroad traction. Maybe just the thing for us BMX'ers.


Aren't there some foam inserts that you can put in your standard tires?
Anyone know if they are worth the $$$?

[edit on 14-8-2009 by hotrodturbo7]




posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 03:16 PM
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i am looking at a BUG OUT bike.

i've got some ideas on the model e.g Hard tail mountain bike.

does any one have any tips for stuf to add to my bike ?

I think this is the best way to travel and until i have to BUG OUT we can get fit for a SITX situation and have fun and practice the process.



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 03:22 PM
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Bug out bike depends on your terrain, how far you expect to go , how you expect to get there, what you're bringing with you and your fitness level.

I'd just use my loaded touring bike. Though I'd expect to ditch it once I got to where I was going.

I'm used to extremely long distance biking with weight. Lots of fun.



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 03:27 PM
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reply to post by thisguyrighthere
 


well its going to be woodland, hills and country roads, and fields.

I can easily do 25 miles plus a day i dont know if thats normal, poor or whatever ?

i will be carrying a small 20 litre backpack. i will be using my bike to get there and travel, because my idea is once the sitx happends to keep moving. I am based in England so the terrain is ok.



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 03:49 PM
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reply to post by thecrow001
 


You'll probably be fine on a hardtail MTB. Things to consider is how far on road and how far off road you expect to travel. Trading those knobbys for slicks will make a huge difference on smooth or paved terrain.

Something to consider if 20 liters is all you plan to carry may be a pannier/backpack. A backpack that doubles as a pannier. Generally waterproof. Keeping the weight off of your back will help a lot over distances. Plus, with a rack you can handle two of the bags doubling your load. Think one bag as a bug out bug out and a second for relative luxuries like one would have on a camping trip. One you can ditch if it becomes too much or trade and one for your necessities.

Panniers on an MTB could be a problem because of the shorter chainstay. Resulting in banging your heel on the bag.

If you honestly "think" you can do 25 in a day I recommend getting a lot more saddle time. With your bag. You might not have to ever ride 200 miles in a day but being able to without dropping dead will make that loaded 25 feel like a walk in the park.

And it never hurts to be more fit.

Maybe you'll end up like me or other cyclists who seek out those double century rides for fun one day.



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 03:58 PM
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Yeah i would say its 80 percent off road my planed travel,

yeah maybe i can move up a size in bags. Thats a good idea about th pannier thanks i'll test it and so on.

Yeah i can do 25 in a day thats on a BMX on in woods and mudroads i only have a BMX right now in working order as i snapped the swing arm on my other mountain bike, long story but it ends with me going in to a tree
lol.

Are you baes in the UK if so do you know of any routes for long distance biking, i want to do long distance biking you know the bike, then camp with just the stuff in your bag and nature then off biking agian.

I just dont know any routes or good places right now i just use sherwood pines, which is not wild enough for me.



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 04:03 PM
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reply to post by thecrow001
 


I'm in the states Northeast.

From what cycling buddies tell me touring and randonneuring is huge in the UK. There should be no shortage of resources for you, from maps to bikes to sites.

Try here for starters: www.cycle-n-sleep.co.uk...
UK Cycle Map
www.cycletourer.co.uk...

[edit on 21-10-2009 by thisguyrighthere]



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 04:06 PM
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well thank you for the links i will check them out.

this will be my next bike just until, i can save for a better bike.

Diamondback Sorrento 09



posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 02:18 AM
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In A SHTF situation A bike can really get you mobile again but what about your BOB or other considerations.

Younger children for instance will have problems keeping the pace.
Getting them use to trail riding would be a good course of action and going for regular rides will help keep everyone in shape.

Having a trailer of some sort almost seems like a necessity in many ways being that if your bugging out from a home environment you can configure your trailer as you see fit.

Having some sort of trailer that can be utilized in many ways seems to go hand in hand with A bike except for the fold down options that you store in the vehicle.

Here is some examples of trailers.
People with experience with bike trailers suggest one wheel trailers for off road situations are the best solution.

Instructable for A Bike Trailer

BOB GEAR One Wheel Trailers
BicycleR Revolution Trailers
Burley
CycleTote

www.bicycletrailers.com...

[edit on 22-10-2009 by The Utopian Penguin]



posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 03:00 PM
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I went to two bike shops in the area.

At store 1, I was offered a 2010 Trek 4500 out the door for $675. Seems like a decent bike -- rode it around the parking lot for 5 minutes. The reviews and ratings on the web look good.

At store 2, I was offered a (new) 2008 Diamond Back Response Comp for $550 out the door. Also seemed like a decent bike. I was able to ride it for a very short time indoors. The reviews and ratings on the web also look good.

What do you folks think? Either of these two deals strike your fancy as a good value on a rugged, back-road bike? Is there something better I should be looking at in this range?







[edit on 22-10-2009 by praxis]



posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 03:06 PM
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reply to post by praxis
 


whats your budget ?

Out of the two you picked i would go with Diamondback as i've used them before and they've never done me wrong, however Trek id more suited for Moutain Ranges which could be more versitile for the SITX needs.

Think could you improve the diamondback bike with the money you saved ?

Yes ?



[edit on 22-10-2009 by thecrow001]



posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 03:33 PM
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Originally posted by thecrow001

whats your budget ?

Out of the two you picked i would go with Diamondback as i've used them before and they've never done me wrong, however Trek id more suited for Moutain Ranges which could be more versitile for the SITX needs.

Think could you improve the diamondback bike with the money you saved ?

Yes ?







I really don't have a set budget.

Basically, I try not to buy the entry-level models of products 'cause I know they typically don't hold up.

But to tell you the truth, the Diamond Back did not look like it needed any upgrades. About the only thing I did not like is that it did not have Shimano derailers. But the parts it did have looked like good quality......



posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 03:37 PM
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maybe you just answered your question, i say go with the Diamondback, i am just about to buy one aswell.

i've always like ScottUSA bikes but never been on one


maybe you've saved some money for spare parts and stuff.

I enjoy buying a GPS for my bike to track where i have been.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 02:51 PM
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Originally posted by thecrow001
Yeah i would say its 80 percent off road my planed travel,

yeah maybe i can move up a size in bags. Thats a good idea about th pannier thanks i'll test it and so on.

Yeah i can do 25 in a day thats on a BMX on in woods and mudroads i only have a BMX right now in working order as i snapped the swing arm on my other mountain bike, long story but it ends with me going in to a tree
lol.

Are you baes in the UK if so do you know of any routes for long distance biking, i want to do long distance biking you know the bike, then camp with just the stuff in your bag and nature then off biking agian.

I just dont know any routes or good places right now i just use sherwood pines, which is not wild enough for me.


I apologise for not catching this one earlier. I picked up my bicycle about three months ago now. I will not name it as I do not recommend it however it is an ongoing learning process that is documented elsewhere.

You are saying 80% off-road travel. Pretty impressive. Does that include bridleways and footpaths or just plain old fields? I'm not trying to catch you out I'm genuinely interested, mainly because it will impact upon your choices.

Sherwood Pines? Good routes or good places? Depends on what you're looking for. I have cycled a quite a bit of England in my youth (and no-so youth). You can easily rock up late at night, pitch a tent close to a hedge in a field, and hoof it out at dawn.

Feel free to PM me if you want to be more specific. I might be able to help.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 03:07 PM
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its ok about being late i wont be buying my next bike untill jan as my funds are low so at the moment i am stuck with only a bmx because i broke my last bike


My 80 percent does include bridleways and footpaths but mainly it will be woodland and fields because one if i ever had to get to some where quick are hide some where i would take the fastest route instead of going all around on paths.

Sherwood pines or forest based in nottingham its a national park which is good for rides but not very extreme, i;ve been to middlesbough alot around for mountains well big hills lol and scarbough for the moors but i am looking for something alot more woodland if i can, hwoever i do abbandoned places where you may have to carry the bike for a mile what so to get there


where have you been in England can you reccomned any places ? and can you tell me the bike you dont reccomned.

one last thing ilove the idea of pitching pu a tent and then packing up and carrying on.

thankyou for reply.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 05:29 PM
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Yeah, I went for a walk around Clumber two months ago. Regimented pine and only recently the odd haphazard birch.

The problem you're going to find in England (certainly South of Rotherham) is far too many people and too much farmland. You're simply going to struggle to get away from it all for any length of time without coming across a field boundary.

To pull this back onto a more useful keel for other readers the bike as a BOV can be extremely useful in certain circumstances. Anyone who lives in a large urban settlement such as U.K.'s London (or any other large metropolitan area for that matter) knows full well what roads out of a city look like at rush hour. Now, say for example there was a particular emergency that required evacuation. Imagine rush-hour multiplied by your worst nightmare. I'm not suggesting a bike (motorised or not) is the be-all but it certainly has it's advantages.

Now to pull it back to your requirements, Crow. What I would suggest is to start planning cycle trips around bug-out routes. Identify two to four places on different aspects of the compass you may wish to visit if TSHTF and go explore. To begin with go 8 miles then 20. Look at the terrain, the types of road (or not) that get you from A to B. Any possibly back-up roads you could use just in case.

Then have look on GoogleEarth. It's a great resource for finding alternative routes. I managed to find a bridle way and "Welsh country-road" in Essex this way, as well as an old WW1/2 outpost that was a great way point to pick. Gave me something to aim for, even though it was initially only a recce excercise.

Crow, if you're where I think you are your best bets are either into the Peak District or East. Yes, there is nothing of much note East but that's it's appeal. You will only be falling over thousands of refugees, not millions.

[edit on 23-10-2009 by Nirgal]



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 05:40 PM
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yes i think you would be spot on where i live North Nottinghamshire , and Peak district is the place which i enjoy going.

I will do what you say about looking at google earth and A - B maps.

the idea of riding 8 miles and exploring is a great idea then going further each time. Thankyou for your reply.

Lets hope i only use my Spots and Routes for fun.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 05:44 PM
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It is great to see mt. bikes getting the recognition that they deserve. When properly equipped and set up they provide extremely reliable transportation of people and equipment.

here is an excellent do it all rig from the folks at Surly

surlybikes.com...

or you can convert your own steed just like the big dummy

www.xtracycle.com...

The Surly Pugsley is a gem also. It popular in my area when the snow begins to fall.

surlybikes.com...



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 05:47 PM
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I like the idea of and electric assisted bike, with a large roll out solar panel for charging it on the go. Just keep it in your bag with you other supply's, make camp roll out the solar sheet and eat some rabbit and beans while talking to you're shotgun.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by sanchoearlyjones
 


Eh? Why has SEJ been banned?




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