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Category 4 Hurricane Felicia heading towards Hawaii (updated!)

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posted on Aug, 5 2009 @ 03:56 PM
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The National Hurricane Center is reporting two storms brewing in the pacific, but the major one is Hurricane Felicia.
www.nhc.noaa.gov...
Felicia is currently (as of Wednesday, August 5, 11:15 pm, [eastern time]) a Category 4 with winds of 140 mph.

It's current track is subject to change, but is likely to head towards the mainland of Hawaii.



This track shows it reaching Hawaii by either Monday night or Tuesday morning.



It's Tropical Storm force winds extend towards the island a great deal, and could reach it shortly.



The Hurricane Force winds are still contained towards the center of the storm, but will extend as the storm gets closer to shore.

I will update this as the situation develops. The storm is subject to change, and could change course, intensity, and shape.


Hurricanes rarely hit Hawaii, the last one being Hurricane Iniki on September 11, 1992.
( www.usatoday.com... )

[edit on 5-8-2009 by gatorboi117]

[edit on 5-8-2009 by gatorboi117]




posted on Aug, 5 2009 @ 04:26 PM
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Wow when is the last time Hawaii had a hurricane, they are usually in the "safe zone".



posted on Aug, 5 2009 @ 04:36 PM
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It's "Climate Change"
the rules don't apply anymore.

But seriously, any recent update? It's Wednesday.

If you go to nhc.noaa.gov you can actually see it growing in the east pacific.



posted on Aug, 5 2009 @ 04:37 PM
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reply to post by Zenic
 


As of 11:15pm tonight, it has been updated.

Cat. 4 now with winds at 140 mph.

[edit on 5-8-2009 by gatorboi117]



posted on Aug, 5 2009 @ 04:38 PM
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reply to post by jkrog08
 


The last hurricane to hit Hawaii was Hurricane Iniki, which struck as a Category 4 on September 11, 1992.
(en.wikipedia.org...)



posted on Aug, 5 2009 @ 06:59 PM
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This must be Govt. made so that they can wipe out Obama's BC.

How's that for a conspiracy?

It only has a small chance of hitting HI when I watched the update last.



posted on Aug, 5 2009 @ 10:21 PM
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Update from NHC




MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS HAVE INCREASED TO NEAR 140 MPH...
220 KM/HR...WITH HIGHER GUSTS. THIS MAKES FELICIA A CATEGORY FOUR
HURRICANE ON THE SAFFIR-SIMPSON HURRICANE SCALE. FELICIA IS LIKELY
NEAR PEAK INTENSITY...AND WEAKENING IS EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT
COUPLE OF DAYS.

www.nhc.noaa.gov...

Next advisory will come out at 2:00am.



posted on Aug, 8 2009 @ 05:03 AM
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As I watched the weather reports on the local Hawaii news tonight, I noticed some peculiarities. First, was the discrepancy between news reports downplaying Hurricane Felicia as a minor tropical depression, juxtaposed with another news story that five (Five??) Air Force WC-J130s were dispatched from the mainland to take meteorological readings of the hurricane by dropping cylinder-looking instruments into the storm. It explained that four planes would be in rotation with each having one twelve hour shift, for a total of 48 hours of flight time.

www.honoluluadvertiser.com...


Next on the local news channel they showed images of NOAA aircraft and it struck me as odd that on the side of these aircraft in very bold letters it says “Department of Commerce” (not “NOAA”). So I googled the subject to find out why in the world NOAA would fall under the Department of Commerce. Among my findings, I discovered that back in the 60s-70s a project called “StormFury” was implemented by both the Department of Commerce and Department of Defense and included weather experiments called “Cloud Seeding”

en.wikipedia.org...

I am wondering if all of this military activity is unusual and if anyone else suspects that weather experiments might be taking place here. I thought NOAA aircraft was used for taking meteorological readings of hurricanes, so why do they need to bring in the Air Force? And, why are FIVE Air Force planes necessary? Wouldn't one or two planes suffice for a hurricane that is expected to dissipate into a minor tropical depression?

Any thoughts?



posted on Aug, 8 2009 @ 05:49 AM
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Post Removed

[edit on 8-8-2009 by deadoralive]



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