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Swirling debris on Jupiter

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posted on Aug, 4 2009 @ 12:20 AM
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yall remember the thing that hit jupiter??....i know there are lots of thread about this..but the latest update is it seems to be growing.


The impact cloud on Jupiter continues to expand and evolve. On August 1st and 2nd, worldwide observers noted that it had transformed from a concentrated, cindery-black spot to an Earth-sized paling swirl. South is up in this image from Anthony Wesley of Murrumbateman, Australia:





"Polar winds seem to be carrying the main body of the cloud westward (to the right in the photo)," Wesley says. "Also, a small stream of dark material is being pulled down and in the opposite direction--perhaps around a cyclone or some other localised weather feature?" (Bonus: The moon in the foreground casting its shadow on Jupiter's cloudtops is Io.)

Researchers are scrambling to study the cloud before it fully disperses. Light reflected from the debris may hold clues to the nature of the mystery-impactor. "If the cloud's spectra contain signs of water, that would suggest an icy comet. Otherwise, it's probably a rocky or metallic asteroid," says JPL planetary scientist Glenn Orton. Several teams of professional astronomers are working to obtain the data--stay tuned for updates.

Meanwhile, amateur astronomers can monitor the cloud as it shifts and swirls near Jupiter's System II longitude 210°. For the predicted times when it will cross the planet's central meridian, add 2 hours and 6 minutes to Sky and Telescope's predicted transit times for Jupiter's Great Red Spot. [sky map]



ps:...its not niburu(lol)...

[edit on 4-8-2009 by Enjay]

Mod Edit: All Caps – Please Review This Link.


[edit on 4-8-2009 by Gemwolf]




posted on Aug, 4 2009 @ 12:28 AM
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its said to be that if Jupiter was to be ignited that because its the same compounds as the sun that it would certainly do so.....i hope thats not gonna happen, and would it take a lot more than a meteor hitting it to ignite it right?



posted on Aug, 4 2009 @ 12:39 AM
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Originally posted by soldier8828
its said to be that if Jupiter was to be ignited that because its the same compounds as the sun that it would certainly do so.....i hope thats not gonna happen, and would it take a lot more than a meteor hitting it to ignite it right?



wow....thats exactly what i was thinking..lol..but yea i guess a meteor wouldnt ignite a planet as huge as jupiter..(well atleast this one)



posted on Aug, 4 2009 @ 12:58 AM
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Ignition of Jupiter would take a concentration event.. something would have to increase the gravity well in the center of the planet to force it to collapse in on itself so that it will start fusion.



posted on Aug, 4 2009 @ 09:06 AM
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Originally posted by soldier8828
its said to be that if Jupiter was to be ignited that because its the same compounds as the sun that it would certainly do so.....i hope thats not gonna happen, and would it take a lot more than a meteor hitting it to ignite it right?


As rogerstigers said above, the gases of Jupiter would need to be under much more pressure before it has any chance of becoming a star...

...and the word "ignite" is very misleading. A star is not "ignited", i.e. it does not "burn" in the traditional sense. Therefore, a comet or asteroid causing an explosion that would somehow ignite the hydrogen atmosphere on Jupiter is NOT the same as saying it would become a star. Even if Jupiter's hydrogen COULD be ignited (it would need oxygen for this) and all of the hydrogen begins to burn, it would NOT be a star.

The Sun and stars do not work by "burning" -- they work by "nuclear fusion". The tremendous heat and pressure inside a star causes hydrogen to fuse into helium. It is during this fusion process that an extra particle is released, and this release is what causes the Sun's energy.

There is simply not enough material or enough pressure on Jupiter for it to become another sun.



posted on Aug, 4 2009 @ 09:10 AM
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Originally posted by soldier8828
its said to be that if Jupiter was to be ignited that because its the same compounds as the sun that it would certainly do so.....i hope thats not gonna happen, and would it take a lot more than a meteor hitting it to ignite it right?


THats if it was a meterior SMH @ ALL THE LIES MY WHOLE LIFE PRETTY SAD. GOOD THING SOME OF US ARE BORN NATURALLY INTELLIGENT TO OVEROME THE "BULL"



posted on Aug, 4 2009 @ 09:40 AM
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Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
THats if it was a meterior SMH @ ALL THE LIES MY WHOLE LIFE PRETTY SAD. GOOD THING SOME OF US ARE BORN NATURALLY INTELLIGENT TO OVEROME THE "BULL"

So, you have specific evidence that it was something else? Please share what you have.



posted on Aug, 5 2009 @ 12:00 PM
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I'm sorry guys gotta do this...The pic that is in the OP, when I looked at it something struck me as I had just watched 2010 The year we make contact. It looks very similar to the end of the movie when all the litttle monoliths started eating Jupiter...lol..and it's growing.


[edit on 5-8-2009 by djvexd]




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