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College Grad Can't Find Job, Wants $$$ Back

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posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 01:19 PM
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College Grad Can't Find Job, Wants $$$ Back


www.nbcnewyork.com

She went to college to boost her chances of finding a great job once she got out of school, but now that that hasn't happened, Trina Thompson wants her money back.

Thompson, a graduate of Monroe College, is suing her school for the $70,000 she spent on tuition because she hasn't found solid employment since receiving her bachelor's degree in April, according to a published report.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.nypost.com




posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 01:19 PM
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Let me begin by saying this is an example of the absolutely-foolish cases that cripple our court system. Two words: tort reform.

Now, in fairness of this jobless student...she's not actually blaming the university, her frustration is with the career & employment office. According to her, the C&E office didn't do their part to help her become employed.



The 27-year-old alleges the business-oriented Bronx school hasn't lived up to its end of the bargain, and has not done enough to find her a job.

The information-technology student blames Monroe's Office of Career Advancement for not providing her with the leads and career advice it promised.
www.nypost.com...


But c'mon...you're really going to blame the C&E office. Do you think they're your personal job assistant? They offer resources for the individual to take. They can't guarantee employment.

I'm so annoyed right now with this student. Perhaps a few more years of college are needed?!!?

www.nbcnewyork.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 01:24 PM
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reply to post by MOFreemason
 


While she's at it, she might want to sue the Fed. Reserve, Wall Street, and anyone else that could be implicated in the poor economy. Maybe she could sue the invisible hand that drives it as well.



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 01:25 PM
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To be honest, in a way at least. She has paid for a service or product, isnt satisfied with the quality or outcome and there for wants her money back?



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 01:26 PM
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The thing is these kinds of offices in college like to boast things like "X percent placed in jobs within Z months after graduation." This of course is pure marketing nonsense and honestly they shouldn't be able to mention that at all in college advertising schemes because it creates unrealistic expectations. They probably led her on in believing that they could pretty much assure her a job after graduation and with the crashing economy they aren't able to make good on their moronic promises.

Truth be told the student probably should have avoided college all-together and just focused on getting any job that paid rather than a gamble to get a better job which in this economy has a very slim chance of working.



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 01:29 PM
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Let me put it this way... COlleges and Universities are BUSINESSES first, and places of education second. They certainly expend a ton of time, money and energy leading one to believe that receiving an education from their institution is the key to a lucrative career.

Over time, though, many are discovering that college is nothing more than an empty promise. Some personal examples... A buddy of mine who graduated Cum Laude from business chool and secured a job with a major accounting firm left a few years later to become a certified welder. He now has his certs to do underwater welding and makes over $200K a year working about 20 hours a week! Another very close freind never went to college - he is now an elevator mechanic and makes over $80K a year fixing elevators! Comparatively, most people I know with college degrees working in the "Corporate" world are making between $40K and $70K - IF they are lucky enough to have a job right now.

The moral of the story - trade specialists in jobs that cannot be outsourced are likely to make twice as much money as the typical college undergrad. Want to read a great book on the topic? Check out "Shop Craft as Soulcraft" by Mathew B. Crawford. It is an excellent study on the modern work world.



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 01:29 PM
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i hope she gets it back - look how corrupt that system is. look how flawed it is!!!



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 01:32 PM
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This really gets to the heart of the matter. College and higher education is supposed to be about bettering ourselves and becoming more informed, educated, and "enlightened". At least in theory. All college has become is a factory for churning out good little corporate slaves. I don't have much sympathy for this chick or any other college graduate that feels they are entitled to anything. But on the other hand you're right colleges are more of a business nowadays and it's almost as if they guarantee some sort of job. So she definitely didn't get her money's worth. But I still find it BS.



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 01:33 PM
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A lot of schools do boast extraordinary efforts when it comes to job placement. I've even seen some that claimed 'lifetime career placement.'

If the school didn't guarantee, in writing (which they couldn't do) to find her a job, I don't see how they could be responsible.

Caveat Emptor. Maybe they didn't have THAT class in that fancy school.

A lot of people can't find work and they wonder why, when they share a city with 4 or 5 million OTHER job seekers. Try moving out of the big city, for starters, or choose a filed that's more applicable to such a large population center...you know, like a cop, or an EMT...hell, it's the Bronx, maybe they're hiring drug dealers.



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 01:38 PM
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The girl graduated as an IT... like the market isn't flooded with that specialty.

No wonder she can't find anything; I don't know how many times I've turned on the TV to see a commercial advertising one IT school or another.

...

Just in case she, or anyone she knows, comes on here, I've included a couple links for job service / work development sites in their area. It should help.

bronx jobs

dept of labor and workforce develop



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 01:40 PM
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If she feels bad about not finding a job how about the large number of Harvard, Yale, Princeton, etc. grads from this May who thought they would be earning a quarter million/year + bonuses on Wall Street by now and are earning peanuts or are unemployed.



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 01:58 PM
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so she`s suing them because the $100k a year job didn`t walk up to her whilst she`s sitting drinking latte with her friends?

gosh you mean she actually has to send her CV in and go to an interview - then wait whilst the other 100`s of applicants do the same?

[edit on 2/8/09 by Harlequin]



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 02:00 PM
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Originally posted by Harlequin
so she`s suing them because the $100k a year job didn`t walk up to her whilst she`s sitting drinking latte with her friends?

gosh you mean she actually has to send her CV in and go to an interview - then wait whilst the other 100`s of applicants do the same?

[edit on 2/8/09 by Harlequin]


The audacity!

I wonder how quickly before she is contacted by the federal government to come "work for them for a few years and all debts will be relieved."

[edit on 2-8-2009 by MOFreemason]



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 02:00 PM
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She cant hold the school iibel for a crippled economy.Like the previous poster said she'd be lucky to be under employed even.What can you do when you have 100 applicants fighting for one position?



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 02:07 PM
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what does she expect? someone to spoon feed her?



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 02:10 PM
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I don't normally sympathize towards those who have been duped, although these college kids ARE getting totally screwed by something they have been told was the "right" thing to do since they were kids. Man, I didn't go to college and im doing fine playing music and working for local independantly owned businesses. Debt-free is the way to be. Plus, I don't have the 4-year brain-washing that most kids are exposed to these days.
She was on her knees, praying the cash cow would give her happiness and a full life. Now she's finding out the hard way it isn't such a noble beast.



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 02:20 PM
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This is beyond ridiculous. I can't tell you how many times I've interviewed kids fresh out of college, with zero experience under their belts, expecting $30 an hour because they learned to fiddle with Photoshop. Their audacity never ceased to amaze me.


Anyway, kids these days need to realize they have to get practical experience in the work force before they can start climbing that corporate ladder. It's called paying your dues. Start at the bottom and work your way up.

Need a hand? Get an internship, it counts as experience. Really desperate? Get an unpaid internship and work a second job to make ends meet. This is the real world, if you want to achieve something out here, you've got to earn it.

At 27 years of age, this girl should have figured this out by now.



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 02:36 PM
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"Tort reform" isn't the first two words that popped into my head. Those would be "educated idiot".

Someone somewhere should wake this girl up! She isn't guaranteed anything in life except an eventual end to it and taxation while she waits. Our schools are preying on this belief that if one simply jumps through a few hoops, everything they want in life will materialize. If that is so, then I should be wealthy. I'm not. And I don't blame the schools as much as I do the foolhardy students that fall for it.

The fact is that we share this planet with 6 billion other people, every one of which wants the same basic things we do. There is simply not enough to go around to feed all the desires of every person living! The reason is not that we're running out of resources, but that people have a tendency to want much more than they need. So we have ways to limit what people can have. For example, I own a shop. I own a nice shop, complete with a machine shop, woodworking equipment, an electronics lab, chemical apparatus, and an extensive library. I have wanted this shop since I was in my teens. I finally got it. But I don't have a running vehicle right now either, nor a fine house. It was a trade-off. I have a friend who drives a nice truck and has a nice house, but he also works 16 hours a day at two jobs, is making payments to a bank, and sits around in his precious few spare hours drinking beer to relax and wishing he had what I do. It was a trade-off.

Too many people seem to forget that the whole concept of money and capitalism (discounting the mess that the Fed and the government have turned it into) is that a person gets to choose what they will do and therefore what their rewards will be in life. That means more than sitting in a classroom for 4, 6, or even 8 years. It means researching the job market, deciding on a career with growth potential that pays well and that you will enjoy, and then preparing yourself for that career. It means you may have to sacrifice some things you want for other things you want more. It means that you had better be planning ahead, because some of those 6 billion other people are! It means you have to compete for whatever you get.

I know colleges like to brag about how many of their students get jobs. I have seen it myself. But I have also seen that the schools which do this are usually not the best schools and usually strive to find you a job, any job, not necessarily a nice cushy high-paying job you expect! The larger schools with the best track records for successful graduates do not advertise a job when you finish; they still simply offer education.

Specifically to this case, I would like to see how she manages to prove that she would have a better job if she had never went to school. I would also like to see her return the knowledge she (supposedly) gained from that school, since they are being asked to return the money. Is she going to give the money back again if next year she finds the job she was trained for? Or perhaps she could sign a contract that she will never take a job in that occupation?

Yeah, "tort reform" is good, but I'll still go with "educated idiot".

"You can't fix stupid" - Ron White

TheRedneck



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 02:45 PM
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She got her money's worth. The lesson with a $70,000 value is 'DO NOT BELIEVE THE HYPE'.



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 02:46 PM
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Originally posted by MOFreemason
I'm so annoyed right now with this student.


You're so annoyed right now with somebody you never met, and only just heard of, because of an issue they have that has nothing to do with your life? You seriously have nothing better to get so annoyed about?



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