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Obama Officials: End of Recession is Near

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posted on Aug, 3 2009 @ 02:09 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 





Greenspan says the popular 'Cash for Clunkers' program is proof that consumer confidence is growing. But he warns if home prices take another dip, it'll hurt the progress the economy has made.


We do not have the manufacturing base to make a recovery. High costs, poor education and regulation made the USA a poor choice for international companies to invest in new plants They are heading for India and China. Maurice Strong WANTS China to be the next super power and for the USA to crash and burn. Al Gore and Obama are intentionally helping to make his dream come true with the help of the Socialists in US Congress.

'Cash for Clunkers' program I am sure some enterprising people have figured out how to game the system to make big bucks. The welfare system is gamed all the time so I imagine someone has figured out how to apply that knowledge to this program and spread the knowledge far and wide.

As someone else said expect defaults on car loans to go sky high soon




posted on Aug, 3 2009 @ 02:30 PM
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reply to post by crimvelvet
 


They are set to pass us by in the next 5 to 10 years. Is now really the right time to give our Technological edge away?


China's Gains in Manufacturing Stir Friction Across the Pacific

By TIMOTHY AEPPEL
China is on its way to surpassing the U.S. as the world's largest manufacturer far sooner than expected. The question is, does that matter?

In terms of actual size, the answer is, no. But if size is a proxy for relative health of each nation's sector, the answer is yes.

Anyone who walks the aisles of a U.S. retailer might think China already is the world's largest manufacturer. But, in fact, the U.S. retains that distinction by a wide margin. In 2007, the latest year for which data are available, the U.S. accounted for 20% of global manufacturing; China was 12%.

The gap, though, is closing rapidly. According to IHS/Global Insight, an economic-forecasting firm in Lexington, Mass., China will produce more in terms of real value-added by 2015. Using value-added as a measure avoids the problem of double-counting by tallying the value created at each step of an extended production process.



 
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