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Betelgeuse going Supernova?....Sharpest ever images of Betelgeuse reveal how explosive red supergian

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posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 03:21 PM
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Soldier8828 thats just a brilliant animation. I knew how big some of these stars were but don`t think I really ever had any appreciation on just how big these bad boys really are. Thanks very much for that.
I think from previous reading that Eta carinae could certainly pose a problem for us if it goes supernova, and thats at over 7500 light years away (mind you at a 100 times the suns solar mass and seeing that animation its not surprising). So supernovae can certainly be damaging for us and we would not want one happening in the local group of stars




posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 08:58 PM
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Originally posted by centurion1211
Some supernovas can give off a gamma ray burst that if aimed right at us could sterilize the planet.

True. A gamma ray burst (GRB) 500 or even 1000 light years away from Earth could destroy all life on Earth, if the event causing the GRB was pointed toward us.

So that means there could have been a gamma ray burst that had already occurred over 500 years ago whose deadly radiation is headed for Earth right now, ready to wipe out all life...uplifting thought, isn't it?



Originally posted by soldier8828
...some people choose to overlook the fact that there was a comet that was roughly twice the size of jupitar that came into our system and shouldve destroyed us if it wernt for our sun....ill have to find the link to the actual footage of this because ive seen it.


You're talking about Comet 17P/Holmes that was visible in 2007. But it is extremely misleading to say "it was as big as Jupiter" because in actuality, comet Holmes was no bigger than many other comets that become visible.

Comet Holmes' nucleus (the "solid" part of the comet) was only 3.5 kilometers in diameter -- which is tiny, even when compared to the Earth. The part that was larger than Jupiter was the comet's "coma", which is the gas and dust that surround the comet.

When a comet moves into the inner part of our solar system, the Suns' radiation and the solar wind excite the particles comprising the comet and the comet's gasses expand, causing the gassy/dusty coma to grow. It is not unusual at all for a comet's coma to become larger than Jupiter. Comet Holmes' coma, in fact, eventually grew to be even larger than our Sun -- which, while very large, is not "unheard of" for a comet.

And it is NOT true that our Sun "saved" us from comet Holmes -- that was just a story put out by some uniformed people who did not understand how to interpret the images coming from the SOHO spacecraft. The SOHO probe is a spacecraft that watches and takes pictures of the Sun.

These people thought they saw images from SOHO that showed the the Sun "zap" Comet Holmes with a solar flare or a coronal mass ejection, supposedly saving us from Comet Holmes -- but that never happened. Comet Holmes' orbit never takes it inside the orbit of Mars; its orbit is between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter -- i.e. it is always further away from us than the orbit of Mars. Therefore Comet Holmes was NOT ever close to the Earth.

[edit on 8/2/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 11:57 PM
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Originally posted by Oreyeon
Here are some links with good information on this possible Supernova and the consequences we may endure from it:

Might Betelgeuse Go BOOM

Betelgeuse BOOM - Calamitas Apocalyptica

Both Betelgeuse And Antares - Update

That Karl Schwarz guy has a lousy way of delivering bad news... He repeated himself so many times I thought I might actually see Betelgeuse light up the sky before I could get to his next point of argument...

It was a good source of info though. He was describing the worse case scenario, but he made that clear enough, so I'd say it's worth a read. Thanks.



posted on Aug, 28 2009 @ 12:26 AM
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I stopped reading after the image was referred to as "The artist’s impression..."
.



posted on Sep, 17 2010 @ 12:43 PM
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I believe that it will go supernova in mere weeks or months

here what i found
www.doomers.biz...


may 2010 post
"I was talking to my son last week (he works on Mauna Kea), and he mentioned some new observations (that will no doubt get published eventually) of "Beetlejuice"; it's no longer round. This is a huge star, and when it goes, it will be at least as bright as that 1054 supernova...except that this one is 520 light years away, not 6,300: "

When it collapses, it will be at least as bright as the full moon, and maybe as bright as the sun. For six weeks. So the really lucky folks (for whom Betelgeuse is only visible at night) will get 24 hour days, everybody else will get at least some time with two suns in the sky. The extra hour of light from daylight savings time won't burn the crops, but this might. Probably, all we'll get is visible light (not gamma rays or X-rays), so it shouldn't be an ELE. It's sure gonna freak everyone out, though.....
---

well betelgeuse will not be as bright as sun but it could be as bright as moon.
I hope it goes supernova in oct-feb as in winter orion is visible in night.

a cool video



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 02:13 PM
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This phenomenon was seen in the sky of the southern hemisphere in November, could it be related?
www.news24.com...



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 02:24 PM
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Originally posted by ChemBreather

Originally posted by On the level
I dont know about that, doesnt a star going supernova give off a plasma burst that if it hit earth it would completley wipe out humanity
seems a bit of a risk to me


Yep, I saw on History channel on thursday , and some nice space programe, they claimed stars are born all the time, yet all they present is pictures of dying stars?? What is that about ?


It's hard to find stars which are being born. They just sort of pop up so far as we can tell most of the time. They're not bright enough to get our attention.

Supernovas and other Dead Star methods, on the other hand, are a lot easier to track, since we can already see the star and normally have something paying attention to most of the stars.




oh man that'll teach me to look at the date of a post before I reply
edit on 14-12-2010 by Solasis because: ancient!



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 02:45 PM
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So, to keep this straight in my own head....

If we see BG go supernova, it would have happened approximately 520 yrs ago, given it is 520 light years away...So once it is visible, we should treat it as happening now...and expect any after-effects to have traveled much of the distance already...albeit not at Speed of light...

If it took the light itself that long to reach us, how much further behind could we expect this gamma wave or x-ray wave or what have you, if it is indeed headed our way? Weeks? Hours? Months?

Surely, not even an initial blast wave could be that close behind? could it?



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by Cole DeSteele
 


Gamma Rays are a form of light. So the only delay between us seeing the supernova and the arrival of the gamma rays would be whatever time there was between the Flash and the production of the rays.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 02:56 PM
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Originally posted by Solasis
reply to post by Cole DeSteele
 


Gamma Rays are a form of light. So the only delay between us seeing the supernova and the arrival of the gamma rays would be whatever time there was between the Flash and the production of the rays.


Is this something we would feel or only notice via instrumentation? The gamma bombardment?
Do different wavelengths travel at different speeds, and would this difference be potentially ahead of visible light spectrum?
edit on 14-12-2010 by Cole DeSteele because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 03:09 PM
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reply to post by sunspot0
 


According to Wikipedia:

"At its current distance from Earth, such a supernova explosion would be the brightest recorded, outshining the Moon in the night sky and becoming easily visible in broad daylight.[32] Professor J. Craig Wheeler of The University of Texas at Austin predicts the supernova will emit 1053 ergs of neutrinos, which will pass through the star's hydrogen envelope in around an hour, then reach the solar system several centuries later. Since its rotational axis is not pointed toward the Earth, Betelgeuse's supernova is unlikely to send a gamma ray burst in the direction of Earth large enough to damage ecosystems."

Unlikely...

I guess the key question would be how unlikely?



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 03:13 PM
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Originally posted by On the level
I dont know about that, doesnt a star going supernova give off a plasma burst that if it hit earth it would completley wipe out humanity
seems a bit of a risk to me


That's a "Gamma Ray Burst"
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 03:17 PM
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Originally posted by Threadfall
I stopped reading after the image was referred to as "The artist’s impression..."
.


You will never find what you don't search for...


www.dailymail.co.uk...

edit on 12/14/2010 by this_is_who_we_are because: smaller photo


edit on 12/14/2010 by this_is_who_we_are because: format



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 03:21 PM
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Originally posted by centurion1211

Originally posted by gatorboi117
No worries with this one, mate. Supernova stars don't pose much of a threat to us, unless it was our star.


Incorrect.

Some supernovas can give off a gamma ray burst that if aimed right at us could sterilize the planet.


Correct, some scientist believe a gamma ray burst is responsible for a mass extinction or two on earth.

It'd have to be within a few light years to pose any real threat though I believe.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by Cole DeSteele

Originally posted by Solasis
reply to post by Cole DeSteele
 


Gamma Rays are a form of light. So the only delay between us seeing the supernova and the arrival of the gamma rays would be whatever time there was between the Flash and the production of the rays.


Is this something we would feel or only notice via instrumentation? The gamma bombardment?
Do different wavelengths travel at different speeds, and would this difference be potentially ahead of visible light spectrum?
edit on 14-12-2010 by Cole DeSteele because: (no reason given)


There's no way currently to give an early warning for a Gamma ray burst, since it travels at the speed of light we'll be perfectly fine one second and the next you'll be dead.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 03:38 PM
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But here are the scientific facts (theories and conjectures based on reason):

Very interesting topic. It seems that they (People of Antiquity) have related this incident too the 2012 Mayan prophecies as well. Would be something else if this proved to be true for the Mayan calendar prediction..



ts coming and it may reach Earth before 2012. In fact the gamma rays from the Orion star Betelgeuse, when it goes ballistic [Supernova] may hit us any day!
Many people are predicting the end of the Earth when the second brightest star of the Orion Constellation goes Nova. The Internet is being flooded with articles concerning the event is part of the Mayan Calendar 2012 predictions and the end of the world. But what are the facts about this very unusual event located approximately 600 – 800 million light years away from Mother Earth? (The Astronomical Journal –April 2008)
Read more: scienceray.com...


Guess we will have to wait and see whats in store... Another note: "Is the estimation of Betelgeuse an accurate and irrefutable calculation for it's distance from the Earth to it's location?"

S&F, Thanks for sharing the info....



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 03:41 PM
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reply to post by Allred5923
 


Bingo!



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 03:47 PM
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Originally posted by altered_states
I wouldnt be to worried about betelgeuse going supernovae its 520 lightyears away which is a bit to far to do us any harm, never the less nice find and very intresting thanks for sharing.



Betelgeuse

...distance estimates in the last century that have ranged anywhere from 180 to 1,300 light years from Earth...
en.wikipedia.org...



Gamma Ray Burst

The sources of most GRBs are billions of light years away from Earth, implying that the explosions are both extremely energetic (a typical burst releases as much energy in a few seconds as the Sun will in its entire 10 billion year lifetime) and extremely rare (a few per galaxy per million years[1]). All observed GRBs have originated from outside the Milky Way galaxy, although a related class of phenomena, soft gamma repeater flares, are associated with magnetars within the Milky Way. It has been hypothesized that a gamma-ray burst in the Milky Way could cause a mass extinction on Earth.[2]

2. Melott, A.L. et al. (2004). "Did a gamma-ray burst initiate the late Ordovician mass extinction?". International Journal of Astrobiology 3: 55–61. doi:10.1017/S1473550404001910
en.wikipedia.org...
journals.cambridge.org...



edit on 12/14/2010 by this_is_who_we_are because: headings

edit on 12/14/2010 by this_is_who_we_are because: formatting



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 03:52 PM
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The EU theorists think these scientists are crazy.
www.holoscience.com...

Such fear is misplaced. The evolutionary story of self-immolating thermonuclear stars is wrong. Betelgeuse is merely a young star that has not achieved the kind of electrical equilibrium that comes with a bright main sequence photosphere. And supernovae are galactic “electrical circuit breakers,” not a fanciful stellar implosion followed by explosion. There is, in fact, firm evidence of external triggering of supernovae, which is shown in the non-random periodic behavior of extragalactic supernovae. Plasma physicist Anthony Peratt has noted, “Supernovae in the plasma community are viewed as the release of energy from a galactic-dimensioned filament.” And the aftermath of a supernova is clearly an axial Z-pinch plasma discharge configuration.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 04:00 PM
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Originally posted by angelonholiday
This phenomenon was seen in the sky of the southern hemisphere in November, could it be related?
www.news24.com...


No.

That's simply a halo the appears to be around the Sun caused by the Sun shining on ice crystals in Earth's atmosphere -- something similar to a rainbow. The halo is only in our atmosphere and NOT really "around the Sun" out in space.

Here is a website that describes this and other atmospheric optical phenomena:
www.atoptics.co.uk...



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