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'Wrong kind of Christian' can’t get their child into local 'faith school'

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posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 07:46 AM
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Well I've been saying for some time that xtianity is a make it up as you go along joke religion, and here we have more evidence of a delusion in action --




A young girl in Wrexham has been turned down for a place in a “faith school” because she is the wrong kind of Christian.

The parents of 11-year old Aston Padley — who are fervent evangelical Christians — tried to get their daughter into St Joseph’s Catholic and Anglican School but were turned away because they are neither Catholics nor Anglicans.

The family recently lost an appeal against the rejection decision before an independent panel and believe they may have no alternative but to send Aston to another secondary school in September.

Aston’s mother, Amanda Padley told the local newspaper, the Evening Leader: "My husband and I have both been Christians for some time and, along with Aston, regularly attend the Kings Christian Centre in Mold.
Although he has not been ordained, my husband has been a lay preacher for a number of years and has preached at a number of churches in the area. Given this, we find it bizarre that we cannot get our daughter in St Joseph's.” Mrs Padley continued: “The situation seems so unfair when I have heard it said that some other parents get places at faith schools by simply having their child baptised and then taking them along to church a couple of times.

Aston is a very bright child and has had a glowing report from her headteacher and we wanted to get her into St Joseph’s for its Christian ethos. I know we are not the only parents in this position and it seems like discrimination against other Christian faiths." Mr Padley said: "During the appeal the headteacher of St Joseph’s defined a Catholic child as a baptised child. But, in my view, baptism might mean a great deal or it might mean nothing to some people.

Our foremost reason for applying for St Joseph’s was because of its Christian ethos rather than its academic record. I want to see the admission policy to faith schools changed locally and nationally. I also want to see Christian credentials checked after a child has been admitted to a school.”



Xtian credentials !!!!?? Dear god these people have lost the plot completely




posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 08:30 AM
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Originally posted by moocowman

Our foremost reason for applying for St Joseph’s was because of its Christian ethos rather than its academic record.



That right there would be my favorite part of the article.

I'd rather send my children somewhere that has a great academic record... educated not indoctrinated.


But, then again, I'd rather my children learn how to think.



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 08:54 AM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

Private school? Shouldn't they have the right to set the admission standards? If the school is supposed to be for Catholics and Anglicans, and the family is neither, I have no problem with the school denying admission. Providing they don't get any government funds, which I'm assuming they don't.

Maybe it's just me, but I wouldn't want to send my children to a school where they weren't wanted. The "Christian credentials" comment is coming from the family, no? Seems like they're the ones with all the issues.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by yeahright
 


It would appear that (in the UK at least) issues abound, I personally can't send my child to a state school without him/her being exposed to the possibility of delusional christian indoctrination by the teaching staff.

Some of the friends of my child are off to a Christian school next term, why ? Because apparently their xtian parents believe its' a better school than the local "secular" dump that forces children to worship the yahweh jesus god.

So we have a church that is subsidized by the tax payer, regardless of the taxpayers beliefs (or lack of) cherry picking students in order to warp their minds into a delusion.

The parent wanting the best education for the child, unless the education involves the child thinking critically or not believing a man can quite happily live inside of a large fish.

We also have the state schools that are funded by the taxpayer, but whose government is influenced by the deluded xtian clique. That claims to be secular but is obliged by law to include xtian worship.

Yes indeed people very little difference here than in a muslim state, the clamour for our young minds by those with none is just a little more subtle.

It is well past time that we had a blanket banning of religious teaching of any sort at schools. History, Social Studies and Mythology, are fine subjects for our children to explore.
Religion should be kept at home or in the mosques where it belongs IMHO.



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 11:54 AM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.


reply to post by moocowman
 


So there's no school available to you, public or private, that doesn't have a religious based curriculum?

Pardon my ignorance. I'm unfamiliar with the school system in the UK but I must say that really surprises me. Here in the US, the only way to get any religious-based curriculum is in a private school. Any teacher in a public school pushing a religious agenda would get the smackdown fairly quickly.

A "secular" school that promotes religion would be an oxymoron.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by moocowman
 


they dont want to send their kid to a Catholic school anyway. We had more drugs in our school than all the rest of the public schools combined...

and the girls...well lets just say they werent exactly mother teresa like...



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 03:08 PM
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Originally posted by yeahright
Private school? Shouldn't they have the right to set the admission standards? If the school is supposed to be for Catholics and Anglicans, and the family is neither, I have no problem with the school denying admission. Providing they don't get any government funds, which I'm assuming they don't.

Maybe it's just me, but I wouldn't want to send my children to a school where they weren't wanted. The "Christian credentials" comment is coming from the family, no? Seems like they're the ones with all the issues.


I agree with you yeahright. If it is a private school that does not receive money from the Government they should be entitled to prevent ANYONE they want from attending their school.

Keep those Blacks and Asians out. Prevent those Jews and Muslims from attending. Not in our school to Irish or Italians either. Do not let females in. No gays. No Children of Republicans at ALL will be attending. You drive a FORD? Move along, you are the weakest link.

I am all about equal opportunity Bigotry. Why stop at religion when there are SO many other factors that we should be legally allowed to prejudice against for our private businesses.



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 03:12 PM
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I know some friends who are Jewish who have gone to Catholic schools. This one must be different than some of the ones around here.

Really, if you believe in Jesus, you're Christian. Close enough, IMO.

Plus, what if you really believe that you are one religion? What do they want, papers documenting what religion you are?



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 03:16 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.


reply to post by TurkeyBurgers
 


You really think that's the same thing? You think having a Catholic school for Catholics is akin to keeping out other races?

You can choose your religious affiliation. Your race? Not so much. But thanks for the reductio ad absurdum. It always amuses me.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 03:20 PM
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Although I'm not Christian (or any religion for that matter,) I have to side with the school here - being a private school, they have the right to allow or deny admission as they see fit.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by yeahright
 


I take it you are not up with current Science? Michael Jackson would have had a few words to say to you about "Choosing your race".

With our current level of technology you most certainly do not have to live the life of a "Black" or a "White" anymore.

Then you can go to the right school because you will be the color that school requires.

Thanks for the "Lack of Scientific knowledge". It always amuses me.



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 05:30 PM
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reply to post by yeahright
 





So there's no school available to you, public or private, that doesn't have a religious based curriculum?


The curriculum in the public schools are not religious based, however, these "secular "schools are being influenced heavily by xtianity.

Religious studies are part of the curriculum but the parent has the right to opt their child out, their child obviously facing the consequences of doing such.

Collective worship is required by law in UK schools, which particular deity that is worshiped, is decided by those that run the school.

The teaching staff and education authority spokespeople that I have spoken to so far, (who "ALL" happen to be xtian" claim that their choice of worship is "broadly christian" whatever the hell that's supposed to mean.

The assumption is in most of the schools, that all children have the label "christian" unless the parents goes out of their way to show otherwise.


Religious education is not monitored so is left to the whims of the teaching staff and their particular religious leanings. So, if the head teacher is an xtian you can damned well bet the religious studies teacher is going to have the same views.

Here's a copy of a letter I sent to one of my kids schools in order for my child to avoid sneaky back door christian indoctrination.




Dear Head Teacher As the parent of NAME OF CHILD, I am writing formally to give notice that I am requesting his/her being withdrawn from RE lessons and acts of Collective Worship at your school with immediate effect, in accordance with Section 71 of the School Standards and Framework Act 1998. You are doubtless aware that the right to withdraw children from RE lessons and religious worship in schools is unconditional and can even be exercised in schools that are religious in nature. I am confident that I can count on you to take all necessary action to ensure that this formal request is complied with, but emphasize that I wish my child to continue to attend assembly except for the Collective Worship element. I am sure I can count on you to ensure that this request will not result in NAME OF CHILD being treated by staff in any disadvantageous way. I mention this only because is not unknown for such requests to result in children being excluded from the whole of assembly or, when withdrawn from RE, to be allocated some menial task. Clearly, such victimization would be completely unacceptable. I would however be grateful were the school to make arrangements for alternative lessons to be given to my child during RE lessons and, if length warrants it, during acts of Collective Worship. If alternative lessons are not provided, I ask that my child be given the opportunity for private study As you know, there is no requirement for any explanation of this decision. It is final and I am not prepared to enter into any further negotiations on the matter, save, if necessary, over the practical details of implementation. If you wish to raise any questions of this nature, I would prefer them to be made in writing. Yours faithfully



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 05:41 PM
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reply to post by ravenshadow13
 





Really, if you believe in Jesus, you're Christian. Close enough, IMO.


Clearly not, there are "real christians" and "not real" christians. I suppose only a "real christian" knows the difference, and a non real christian never will, just like a madman doesn't know he's a madman.

If there is a real jesus yahweh god---

" Dear god, please pleas please give your people a planet of their own so the rest of us can live in peace, thanks in advance your ever loving obedient to the very end Moocowman"

PS " I would have believed in you myself but you didn't bother presenting any evidence worthy of my acceptance "



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by moocowman
 


I just think it's weird because I know tons of Catholic schools that accept Jewish people or people with other religious affiliations.

Especially if you have the money. If you've got the money to go, most schools accept you no matter what. As is the rule with colleges, usually.



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 05:47 PM
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reply to post by ravenshadow13
 


Not too many people discriminate against the "Rich". Maybe our current government trying to tax the heck out of them.



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 07:36 PM
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reply to post by moocowman
 

Really?
As far as I remember, RE was not really majorly about Christianity. Besides, I seem to remember nobody ever took RE seriously, least of all the teachers. Seemed like one of those extra, for-the-hell-of-it subjects. Pity, because I actually find comparisons and basic understanding of various religions pretty interesting, and a vital part of a child's education.



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 08:24 PM
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reply to post by babloyi
 


Like I tried to explain earlier, a lot is in the hands of individual teaching staff when it comes to RE.

An example is an xtian RE teacher down marking a pupil because the pupil observes in essay that lack of evidence of one particular jesus being a god.

The teacher in question wrote in red across the essay "Jesus is real"! This is not a fact and is part of that individual teachers delusion. The teacher is using her authority over the child to try and influence the child into accepting her delusion.

I myself was forced to have RE at school, both teachers were christian and I was totally unaware that there were any other religions (other than the weirdo jehovas kids who were made to disappear at assembly ) while I was at school.

School assembly is a completely different kettle of fish with the same theme, "What Christians can get away with".

I understand the value to having a basic understanding of various religions can be beneficial in a multicultural society, but social studies and history and mythology can easily cover this subject in a very short period of time.

If a parent desperately wants a child to learn about religions then what better place to take them than a church or synagogue or mosque? Why try and bring them to a school and run the risk of them being taught as fact ?

To have a child down marked because he or she has no been presented with evidence of the invisible man in the sky, or flying horses or a man that lived inside a fish is a bloody disgrace to education.



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 08:57 PM
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Just as well.
That child is better off not being enrolled in a faith school.



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 11:15 AM
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reply to post by moocowman
 


I think to better understand where the Catholics/Anglicans are coming from, you'd have to know what they believe compared to Evangelicals.

Catholics [and I think to a lesser extent Anglicans] believe in the authority of the church and anything that the church says is what goes. The church could, in theory, say that, in order to truly be Christian, you have to eat Rocky Road ice-cream every Thursday at four in the afternoon, because we're the church and you have to obey us, no questions asked. In other words, how you follow what the church says determines your Christianity. Evangelism isn't needed.

Evangelicals, on the other had, traditionally find their authority in the Bible and believe that you can obtain salvation outside of any established church, though grace and faith in Jesus Christ. In other words, what have you done with Christ's person and work. Evangelism is necessary because everyone needs to be given at least a chance to accept the Gospel.

Now, those are overly simplified definitions, but I feel that they're good enough to make this point. The Catholic school could've turned the Evangelical student away because, they would be afraid that the student would bring up how a lot of what they would learn in religion class isn't in the Bible. This could go on to her evangelizing to fellow students, telling them that they don't need to follow what the church says and confess all your sins to a priest to be saved, only accept Christ as savior. In short, it could just cause a ruckus with different doctrinal views going around.

Whether or not that is a good or bad way to handle the problem is up to oneself to decide.

Beyond that though, I echo the sentiments of many who've said that since it's a private school, they can turn away whoever they want.



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 11:39 AM
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I don't think their should be Sectarian schools in Britain at taxpayers expense.

Am i correct in saying that people have to pay for their children to go to a religious school in the U.S.A?

If people want a religious education they should pay for it Religion i think should get taught in the home or whatever place of worship they attend!

We have seen the dangers of what can happen in Religious schools and institutions in Ireland and elswhere



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