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Memristor minds: The future of artificial intelligence

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posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 03:30 AM
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EVER had the feeling something is missing? If so, you're in good company. Dmitri Mendeleev did in 1869 when he noticed four gaps in his periodic table. They turned out to be the undiscovered elements scandium, gallium, technetium and germanium. Paul Dirac did in 1929 when he looked deep into the quantum-mechanical equation he had formulated to describe the electron. Besides the electron, he saw something else that looked rather like it, but different. It was only in 1932, when the electron's antimatter sibling, the positron, was sighted in cosmic rays that such a thing was found to exist. Except that they do. Within the past couple of years, memristors have morphed from obscure jargon into one of the hottest properties in physics. They've not only been made, but their unique capabilities might revolutionise consumer electronics. More than that, though, along with completing the jigsaw of electronics, they might solve the puzzle of how nature makes that most delicate and powerful of computers - the brain.


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interesting stuff.. enjoy




posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 05:39 AM
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reply to post by GerhardSA
 


Interesting article.

When they 'trained' the memristor to anticipate the voltage pulse they had previously applied to it, and then it behaved as though it had recieved a pulse!

Where did the energy come from that caused the circuit to mechanically behave as though it had indeed received a pulse, even though it had not? What was the energy that drove this?

Does this mean that for every four linked memristor circuits, one of them will be a 'virtual self powered device'?

If they blasted the circuit with four voltage pulses to train it, then only applied three susequent voltage pulses, yet the circuit anticipated the fourth (That didn't happen again), and behaved as it had to the previous three pulses, where did the energy come from to stimulate and produce the anticipated fourth 'ghost' pulse responce from the circuit?

Are we talking quantum entanglement here? Quantum power tapping (so called vacuum energy) possibly?

I have a hunch this technology will not only revolutionise computing, but could be the root of quantum vacuum energy generators.

If for every three pulses input, we get one for free is correct, then every fourth (or any other arbitrary number) memristor circuit (among perhaps trillions of pulses per sec) we will always be getting 25% for free.

Of course, i'm thinking out loud here, but does anyone else see what i mean here?



[edit on 31/7/2009 by spikey]

[edit on 31/7/2009 by spikey]



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