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GOES-14 first image

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posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 08:28 PM
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NOAA's newest Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, positioned 22,336 miles over the Pacific near South America, has returned its first full disc image. It's impressive.
www.osei.noaa.gov...




posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 08:44 PM
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Beautiful image!

Thanks for posting!



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 08:47 PM
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Thank you for the posting.

I couldn't agree more..very impressive.



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 08:58 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Very nice! May use this is my wallpaper.

Thanks for posting!



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 08:59 PM
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WOW WOW WOW WOW! nd is that picture ever impressive phage! i cant any words outide of beutiful to describe that photo! this is such a positive find man...
I did notice what appears to be possible con or chemtrails??? Look at BAHA and souther california..then look left(west of it) in that immediate weatehr system their, in the middle, yuo can visibly see what appears to be exahust fumes, if i can call it that, form plens? They make lines over eachother! whats anyones input on that?



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 09:16 PM
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Wow, that image is FANTASTIC!


And the website is pretty amazing too, with its "Daily Significant Event Imagery" (among lots of other features):
www.osei.noaa.gov...

Under "Current event" you can also find satelite images of the moving shadow on Earth during the latest solar eclipse, like in this gif:
www.osei.noaa.gov...

Thanks for finding and sharing this!



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 09:21 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Hey!!!

I can see my house from here---------



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 09:22 PM
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anyone else notice the chem trails in the clouds west of california? I dont see them elsewhere...

heavy air traffic?



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 09:25 PM
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reply to post by sm0k3
 



...anyone else notice the chem trails in the clouds west of california? I dont see them elsewhere...


***face/palm***

Second poster, already. AND, to think the second I saw the picture I thought, "Oh good, we can put the "chemtrail" nonsense to rest, finally!"

Boy, what was I thinking???

Ship Trails



[edit on 30 July 2009 by weedwhacker]



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 10:22 PM
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Shouldn't you be able to see at least one satellite if we are looking at half of the Earth?

It must be high enough to capture a satellite or ISS or space junk ect. if it's high enough to capture the whole Earth.

No?



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 10:45 PM
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Originally posted by breakingdradles
Shouldn't you be able to see at least one satellite if we are looking at half of the Earth?

It must be high enough to capture a satellite or ISS or space junk ect. if it's high enough to capture the whole Earth.

No?


You would think!
Maybe they can put one up that does'nt have the background blacked out and is'nt an indexed GIF.



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 12:18 AM
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reply to post by breakingdradles
 

The disk of Earth is 8,000 miles across. The ISS orbits about 200 miles above the surface of the Earth. That is 1/40th the width of the disc.

If the ISS were directly below the GEOS satellite it would still be 23,000 miles away from it. The ISS is the largest thing in orbit around the Earth. It is about 100 yards across. See those islands in the Sea of Cortez off Baja? Those islands are about 20 miles long. So the ISS, or any other satellite, would be very very very difficult to see.

[edit on 7/31/2009 by Phage]



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 12:48 AM
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Originally posted by ShadowLink
You would think!
Maybe they can put one up that does'nt have the background blacked out and is'nt an indexed GIF.


The background is blacked out because they want to avoid a repeat of this:



[edit on 31-7-2009 by star in a jar]



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 12:52 AM
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amazing image. isnt our planet just beautiful?




posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 10:29 AM
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someone please tell me why its in grey scale. I am sick of these grey scale images of mars, moon and now the earth.

Why strip the color out of these images?



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 10:36 AM
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The level of detail is wonderous!

Thanks Phage!



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 10:42 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by breakingdradles
 

The disk of Earth is 8,000 miles across. The ISS orbits about 200 miles above the surface of the Earth. That is 1/40th the width of the disc.

If the ISS were directly below the GEOS satellite it would still be 23,000 miles away from it. The ISS is the largest thing in orbit around the Earth. It is about 100 yards across. See those islands in the Sea of Cortez off Baja? Those islands are about 20 miles long. So the ISS, or any other satellite, would be very very very difficult to see.

[edit on 7/31/2009 by Phage]


Interesting.

Not sure if I am going to use the right words here.

So if the resolution of the camera were good enough it might be possible to find smaller objects in the field of view if you knew where to look? it would be cool to have an overlay that showed the location of some of the objects in orbit that are in this pic but to small to see...



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 10:58 AM
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Originally posted by epete22
someone please tell me why its in grey scale. I am sick of these grey scale images of mars, moon and now the earth.

Why strip the color out of these images?

I don't know about the GEOS images, but for the Mars images they do not "strip" the color from them -- the raw pictures from Mars are all in greyscale. The colors are added later after the image is received here on Earth.

The Mars rover digital camera (and all digital cameras -- including yours) are basically "colorblind". The camera cannot distinguish colors they way we distinguish colors. Instead each image is captured through a series of filters that produces greyscale images. Different colors seen through different filters produce different intensities of "grey". The camera's computer then assigns a color to these intensities of "grey", thus creating an "approximate true color" image.

Your camera does all this before showing you the "color" image. However, the imaging scientists who are working with the Mars images would rather receive the raw greyscale pictures because more science can be done with these series of pictures viewed through different filters (and thus separated into different wavelengths of light). These raw, separated wavelength greyscale images are valuable to the scientists.

So, each approximate true color image you see of Mars is actually created by using a series of greyscale images take through the different filters, and then a computer translates the grayscales into approximate colors.


[edit on 7/31/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 11:13 AM
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Phage,

Great picture. I was wondering if this is a single image or a mosaic of several images. I was looking for this info on the GEOS website, but I couldn't find it.

I suppose being 23,000 miles away, a single image should be able to capture the entire 8,000 mile diameter of Earth, but I wasn't sure. Do you know this?



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 11:39 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 

It is a single image but it consists of 8km (N-S) "sweeps".
noaasis.noaa.gov...



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