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The Alien Letter "W"

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posted on May, 10 2004 @ 12:04 PM
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So simply put why is the letter "DOUBLE U" the only letter with more than one syllabal?

any english scholars out there?

why couldnt they think of a name for it with only one syllabal like the rest of the letters of the alphebet?




posted on May, 10 2004 @ 05:19 PM
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oh wow, i never notices it was the only one with more than one syllable...

i DO know that it is called a "double U" because it is like two "U" stuck back to back liek this UU... it kinda looks like a W...

but why isnt an M called a "double N"??? and also the question from the first post...^



posted on May, 10 2004 @ 06:05 PM
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In Spanish it's pronounced dooble ve. I don't know the special characters to set up the punctuation correctly.

Regardless, at least Mexican Spanish prnounces it like double v, which I think W looks like anyway. VV seems more like a W than UU does.

Then again, I'm no expert on Spanish either so what do I know.

-The Big O



posted on May, 10 2004 @ 06:32 PM
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A bit like how J took over from Y in the language, so some words that were spelt with a Y originally are now spelt with a J.

There are a lot of wierdness in English. the word "Island" is a manufactured word from the word "Isle" the S was kept in there by thingiee(Boswells mate) to remind people where the word came from



posted on May, 13 2004 @ 01:00 PM
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In French W is doobleh Vee too. I have no idea why it is the only two syllabled letter though, apart from double-yew because it looks like 2 u's. I shall look in Oxford English Usage to see if it says anything.



posted on May, 13 2004 @ 01:08 PM
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Originally posted by Qlone
So simply put why is the letter "DOUBLE U" the only letter with more than one syllabal?

any english scholars out there?

why couldnt they think of a name for it with only one syllabal like the rest of the letters of the alphebet?


I just had to say how I really like how you think 'out of the box'. I never saw it that way before until I read this!
But I'm sorry, I don't know the answer to it. Yea, haha, it's alien to me too!



posted on May, 13 2004 @ 01:24 PM
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In french, the letter W is called "double V" or in english "double V"



posted on May, 25 2004 @ 09:29 AM
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Because its The 23rd letter or symbol; and The Number resonate's to The Binary star sirius-note that there are three stars in the system called{ABC}ie.sirius A Sirius B Sirius C.and after w there are three left xyz; we have 26 in all because 26 denotes The Anunakki who are the ones who brought life or civilization to orb earth,they are symbolized by sura 26 in the Holy Quran The Poets for They The Anunakki are dictators or writers of The Holy scriptures etc... see The following web site{www.unn13.com}



posted on May, 25 2004 @ 09:34 AM
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Just from the looks of it........shouldn't it be called "double V" and not "double U"...........I mean it is VV not UU. Just an observation.



posted on May, 25 2004 @ 09:39 AM
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Originally posted by Qlone
So simply put why is the letter "DOUBLE U" the only letter with more than one syllabal?

any english scholars out there?

why couldnt they think of a name for it with only one syllabal like the rest of the letters of the alphebet?


Here we go :



W was invented in the 7th century by Anglo-Saxon writers, it was originally a double U (hence its English name, because the /w/ sound was spelled "uu"). The Latin /w/ sound developed into Romance /v/; therefore V no longer adequately represented Germanic /w/. In German - like in Romance - the phoneme /w/ was lost, this is why German W represents /v/ rather than /w/. In Dutch, W is an approximant (with the exception of words with EEUW, which have [-e:w]).

In the Swedish and Finnish alphabets, "W" is seen as a variant of "V" and not a separate letter. It is however recognised and maintained in names, like "William".


Source and more : syria.asinah.net...



posted on May, 25 2004 @ 02:47 PM
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Qlone asked this very profound question...

The Alien Letter "W"

So simply put why is the letter "DOUBLE U" the only letter with more than one syllable?

Any english scholars out there?

Why couldn't they think of a name for it with only one syllable like the rest of the letters of the alphabet?

Which response to have been very shallow all the rocket scientists seem to be staying down to earth-which is typical of the anglo-saxon mind in these matters of esoterica, which only they are supposed to be the authority.

Above in my reply I came off the top of my head and gave you an answer which may have eluded most of you-then I'm sure some are aware of your genetic make-up, i.e. your true origin; if you want to believe in J.C. thats ok too, we must understand that DNA is The blueprint of life, therefore it is not man who do what he does save life itself if you get my point, when Quran says,and Allah is as close to you as your juglar vein this means that Allah knows all it is he who cause us to do what we do and not we ourselves I'm aware that you's might be joking around, but I'm still present the facts of this matter of the double u's now go back up and read what I said above before I went to see what The 'Wyaat' man had to say about this subject, first I would like to say in relation to my first post that the DNA is Binary, i.e. double helix as the binary star sirius that is to say back up sun to ours and its own twin stars B/C, now to Academia's or a 'Wyaat' man's research...

------------------------------------------------------
The Cosmic Code by Zecharia Sitchin
Chapter 7 Sacred Knowledge, Sacred Texts
Page 147


There is more to the first alphabet as a secret of the gods. It is based in our opinion on the most sophisticated and ultimate knowledge-that of the genetic code.

When the Greeks adopted the Mosaic alphabet a thousand years later (reversing it as a mirror image), they found it necessary to add more letters in order to allow for all the pronunciation needs. In fact, within the confines of the twenty-two letters of the Mosaic-Semitic alphabet, some letters can be pronounced as "sot" (V, Kh, S, Th) or hard (B, K, SH, T); and other letters had to double up as vowels.

Indeed, as we contemplate this limitation to twenty-two -no more, no less we cannot help recalling the constrictions applied to the sacred number twelve (requiring the addition or dropping of deities in order to keep the "Olympian Circle" to precisely twelve). Did such a hidden principle divinely inspired apply to the restriction of the original alphabet to twenty-two letter?

The number ought to be familiar in this day and age. It is the number of human chromosones when The Adam was created, before the second genetic manipulation has added the sex chromosones "Y" and "X"!

The Twelth Planet
Chapter 2 The Sudden Civilization
Page 13


Even the Hellenic alphabet, from which the Latin and our own alphabets derive, came from the Near East. The ancient Greek Historians themselves wrote that a Phoenician named Kadmus ("ancient") brought them the alphabet, comprising the same number of letters, in the same when order, as in Hebrew; it was the only Greek alphabet when the Trojan War took place. The number of letters was raised to twenty-six by poet Simonides of Ceos in the fifth century B.C.
------------------------------------------------------

So we can see if we have eyes to that the orgin of the two u's is truely Alien and not from this planet it is genetic meaning there is not a thing u's
discovered it was all here before u's were genetically created...


[Edited on 25-5-2004 by LordEnki]



posted on May, 25 2004 @ 03:03 PM
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In Dutch the 'w' is just another letter with one syllable: it is pronounced 'wa' (a bit like 'wait' without the 'it' part) in English pronounciation and 'wee' in Dutch pronounciation. This indicates not all germanic languages call 'w' a double 'v' or 'u'.



posted on Jun, 10 2004 @ 08:21 PM
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The Letter W has a distant origin, from the Waw, or hook. It may have originally represented a weapon, like Mace. The greeks had one version that looked like an F, and another, "upsilon", that looked like V, which would also be written as a U, and later adopted as a Y

it was in the 7th century that English writers the "double U" was adopted, and remained ever since.



posted on Jun, 10 2004 @ 08:38 PM
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Well,
I'm not sure where this might be going! I don't think that I can attribute any merit to the idea of a multiple syllable letter. Particularly when the inverse is simply the plain old "M". I guess my next question is why is "W" associated with aliens? Is there some proof or tradition? It makes no sense!



posted on Jun, 10 2004 @ 08:44 PM
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Originally posted by AlterEgo
Well,
I guess my next question is why is "W" associated with aliens? Is there some proof or tradition? It makes no sense!


The mean alien as in it is not like any otheror the lone letter out, not extra terrestrial



posted on Jun, 15 2004 @ 07:24 PM
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I always get in trouble for calling it double V, the teachers don't appreciate it. But what I want to know is why is 0 and O different? Both circles, and when written on paper, it is the same, it is only dif. on computers so you can tell what you typed. b00ger, J0e, bOOger, JOe. O'Malley, 0'Malley. Anyways, I really don't care, just thought maybe someone could explain the dif. between the writting of 0 and O. Maybe in foreign languages it written dif.



posted on Jun, 16 2004 @ 01:20 AM
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O ("Oh") is a letter and 0 ("zero") is a number. There is no letter Zero, and there is no number Oh. No other letters or numbers are interchangable, why should these two be, even if they look similar? It has the potential to lead to all kinds of alphanumeric problems. Keep 'em seperated. Our counting system and language were not created at the same time or by the same people, coincidentally, there was some overlap. S looks like 5, I looks like 1, etc. They are just easy convenient shapes.

Your teachers don't like it because it shows a spirit of non-conformity to established ideas, but I digress. . .

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

For W, think of your handwriting. My W's look a lot like "UU." I think common handwritten "w" has in the past and continues today to look more like "uu" than "vv." It's only when people type, use a printing press, or make a very neat public document that "w" looks like "vv." This satifies my curiousity to the extent of "Why Double U instead of Double V?"

Why double-anything instead of a unique name? I dunno, could be human laziness. I don't really see the argument for M being "Double-N" in the same logic. M is /\/\ or |\/|, "Double-N" is |\|\|. M would be more like "Double-A-Without-The-Crosspiece," which just sucks as a name. The idea could work at a lower case level, but I prefer to think in terms of the capital letters.

I tend to think there is no profound reason why it has such a weird name.

--J1m





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