question; are inanimate objects affected by windchill?

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posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 11:11 PM
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I have wondered for a long time and realized all the brainpower I had at my disposal here at ATS,so here ya go what do you think? I live in Chicago in case your wondering why I was wondering.

[edit on 29-7-2009 by genius/idoit]

[edit on 29-7-2009 by genius/idoit]




posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 11:19 PM
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Yes and no.

Wind chill will cause an inanimate object to cool the the ambient air temperature faster. It will not cause the object to get colder than the air temperature, unless it's wet. If it is wet, evaporative cooling will allow it to get colder than the air.

[edit on 7/29/2009 by Phage]



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 11:21 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 

so I would assume the water would affect it because the water is "alive"?



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 11:29 PM
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reply to post by genius/idoit
 

No.
As water evaporates it draws heat from the object. It doesn't have to be water. Alcohol would do a better job.


[edit on 7/29/2009 by Phage]



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 11:41 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 

so the water would affect it without any wind?



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 11:45 PM
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reply to post by genius/idoit
 

Yes. But wind enhances the effect.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


because it makes the water evaporate quicker?I got it,no water no windchill



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 11:59 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


another question; can sound affect the protons and neutrons in an atom,To change the magnetic properties of the atom?.....edit; punctuation

[edit on 30-7-2009 by genius/idoit]



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 08:23 AM
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Are you doing homework? haha



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 10:06 AM
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reply to post by genius/idoit
 


The wind is actually the cause of the evaporation. I'm sure you understand it having experienced windchill. When there is water on your skin and you feel a cool breeze you will notice your skin getting colder. The same works on inanimate objects.



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 10:13 AM
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reply to post by genius/idoit
 


I know sound can produce effects like anti-gravity at certain frequencies. I don't think it directly influences the polarity of an atom nor a magnetic field.

For example; the only reason a wire makes sound is because of the conversion of the atomic energy into physical energy. A microphone does this backwards.



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 09:34 PM
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reply to post by DaMod
 





I know sound can produce effects like anti-gravity at certain frequencies. I don't think it directly influences the polarity of an atom nor a magnetic field.
please elaborate or tell me where I can read about this.if it doesn't change the atom how can it effect it's gravity?Is it on a different level?





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