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Slimeball cop rear ends civilian, frames her for DUI to cover his behind and forgets to turn off mic

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posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 01:42 PM
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reply to post by Karlhungis
 



But, she was drunk and the cop would not have to lie anyway; as law states in this state of Florida, as well as NJ, PA, And Delaware that I know of, that you are at fault if you are drunk. Period... That's life, she should have not been on the road at all because she was drunk she will get exactly what she deserves...Period! The officer did a breathilizer that proved she was drunk...he states that in the video, you can't fake a breathilizer, no way because every time a person registers above, it is recorded time and date stamped and a printout comes out at the station.


[edit on 29-7-2009 by ldyserenity]




posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 01:49 PM
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The article stated that there are 27 pending cases in which these officers are to be called as witnesses. Since their credibility is now zero what will happen with these 27 cases?



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 01:49 PM
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I love how people honestly believe these are "isolated incidents".. "bad apples"

Anyone who cares, read the book The New Prohibiton: Voices of Dissent challenge the drug War. Written by Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), several contributors to the book including police chiefs tell of the rampant gangster police mentality.

Many departments adopted "Testilying" when refering to "testifying" in court. They would lie through their teeth to put people behind bars, of course after they've already framed them. This is nothing new, and is in NO WAY an isolated incident.

This is just one guy getting caught, for every 2 or 3 that are caught there's another 90+ that aren't and I think that's a very safe estimate. How often do you think cops pull eachother over drunk, then actually give them a DUI? Ya right, thats their friend and brother. A safe ride home maybe, but never a DUI.

And the problem with the gangster police and their corruption is that while we pay for millions to spend their life in prison, the streets are no safer and innocent lives ARE ruined.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 01:49 PM
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This makes me glad that I live in a small town that has the provincial police as its police force. I have met a few of them from just being around town and they have been really nice. But I do believe every police force has corruption. In the city I use to live in the Mayor's husband got caught for a DUI. The only reason anyone found out was because the provincial police picked him up. Had the city police picked him up that would have been hushed and probably would have dropped the charges.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 01:51 PM
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The video show how stupid some people can be and how crooked stupid cops can be.

A police officer, rather than serving and protecting, decided to risk his job and livelyhood in the hopes that his fellow officers will not get scolded for causing a traffic accident.

I hope he lost his job. And I hope that all those involved at least get reprimanded. I hope the girl serves out her DUI charge.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 01:56 PM
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Wow!

I live here in Fort Lauderdale, FL. i run the valet at a high end restaurant down here that this lawyer, Finkelstein eats at. i park his Mercedes probably once a month. i'm definately gonna ask him about this, i hope the cops don't get off for this. i'll report back to this thread after the next time i see him.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 01:57 PM
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You know, as a child and well into my teenage years, my parent's have told me to respect authority and especially police officers. I still do to this day, "yes sir", "I'm sorry sir", etc. but it's to the point where you simply cannot trust cops.

The motto "To Protect and Serve" has gone out the window at this point. Abuse of power within police department's all over the country is running rampant and there is not a damn thing being done about it. What do these cops get; 2 weeks paid suspension?

I feel hesitant to even ask an officer for help anymore. I flagged down an officer in my friends driveway not too long ago to help me get my keys out of my car which I had locked in. He pulled over to us, asked what the problem was and told me to call triple A, he didn't have time for that s***. Mind you, I live in a town in which is VERY small and VERY community oriented.

Bottom line, I stopped liking cops a while ago. My basketball rec coach for 10 years was a great guy and an officer in my town, and I'd be HARD PRESSED to find an officer anymore who does their job, which is doing the right thing.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 02:07 PM
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Originally posted by tyranny22
The video show how stupid some people can be and how crooked stupid cops can be.

A police officer, rather than serving and protecting, decided to risk his job and livelyhood in the hopes that his fellow officers will not get scolded for causing a traffic accident.

I hope he lost his job. And I hope that all those involved at least get reprimanded. I hope the girl serves out her DUI charge.



People need to really remove this layer of ignorance from their perception.

Ignorance = "The cops are here to serve and protect" (the people)

Reality = "The cops are here to serve and protect" (their corporation)

Every single city, state, county, township, province, etc are all corporations. The police officers enforce the policies of their corporations. They protect their corporation, and serve their corporation.

Cops are policy enforcement officers in place to serve and protect their corporation. NOT the people. That is 100% myth, and not the reality of our time.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 02:11 PM
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Typical police behavior, nothing to see here.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 02:18 PM
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Originally posted by kosmicjack

Originally posted by PsykoOps
Makes you wonder how often they get away with this kind of stuff.


It seems like it's happening more and more. Maybe it's just the dashboard cameras but still, it's disheartening.



It's been going on for decades.

I had a friend whose father was eventually a hypo.

If you knew him personally you were set. If you didn't well you were just SOL then.

He eventually was killed in a shoot out and got all these honors and medals at the funeral.

Quite disgusting in a way as he was a wife beater on top of it.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 02:26 PM
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Oh and I forgot to mention about the 3 Vancouver city police that are being charged for mugging a 47 year old courier one night not too long ago. Turns out these cops were drunk (off duty i believe) , beat up this guy and stole his wallet.

Like I said, they are the biggest gang around. The only difference between them and the street gangs in the world is that they usually get away with it, and you cant defend yourself against them without being arrested.

Power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 02:40 PM
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Originally posted by Karlhungis
The state of law enforcement these days is just out of control.


Respectfully, I beg to differ. The state of law enforcement is not much different from what it was years ago, except that now it is increasingly likely that there will be photographic or audio evidence of what actually happened.

In the olden days, police routinely did exactly this same sort of thing. I've seen it. I've heard officers bragging about it during their coffee breaks. If they had an accident, it was automatically the other person's fault, unless the facts were impossible to hide (e.g., drunken cop in a stolen car who runs over a small child who's in a house, that sort of thing).

When the victims of this unfair practice complained, they weren't believed. Why would a cop lie about it? Your word against theirs, no witnesses except, perhaps, other cops. You automatically lose.

Things aren't getting worse with law enforcement. The dirty little secrets that have festered unseen until now are just coming to light.

[edit on 7/29/2009 by chiron613]



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 02:42 PM
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I guess I will put my neck out there and make myself a target for those that disagree.

The more posts I read and see comments about how all cops are bad, they will be worse then the gestapo, they will kill for food, etc, etc..... I can't believe how we paint these men and women with one brush. Sure there are the bad ones but the MSM covers those stories that get people talking. Stories like this one and others DON'T reflect EVERY police officer. The members of ATS are some of the brightest, open minded people and to see these types of ignorant posts is sickening.

I don't doubt for a second there are bad ones out there but I am thankful for those men and women who risk their lives everyday to arrest those that would rather steal, kill, kidnap, etc, then earn a living and obey the law. We don't talk about those that have died saving lives or keep real drunk drivers from killing anyone.

Just sad to see this group put all police officers in one group and poke at them with a stick......


edited to correct grammar

[edit on 29-7-2009 by Roadblockx]

[edit on 29-7-2009 by Roadblockx]



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 02:48 PM
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reply to post by Roadblockx
 


Trust me, I don't feel ALL cops are bad. I've known many really good and just ones...they are out there.

Its just seems to be a rising trend these days. The sad part about it is that the bad ones give the good ones a bad name. Not to mention, because of their fraternity, good cops often don't stand up to the bad ones because of fear of reprisal from the others. And that if you rat out a fellow officer you are an instant outcast in the department and when you are (good cop) partnered up with someone that is supposed to have your back(bad cop) in a dangerous situation, how long do you think the good cop is going to last before someone decides to shut you up or purposely not cover you in time of need.

[edit on 29-7-2009 by QBSneak000]



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 02:52 PM
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My ex father-in-law was a cop in Oklahoma. My husband and I bought his old car from him with the license plates still attached. I admit there were times I was speeding and got pulled over.

During those times I'd admit that I was without excuse and that the officer had caught me red-handed. They'd always ask who I knew on the police force. When I'd tell them that my father in law was a cop they'd tell me to "slow down" and then send me on my way without any ticket or even a written warning.

Once we got rid of the car years later I started getting busted for things the cops just made up on the spot. No verbal warnings just tickets and arrests for things that aren't even against the law; things they absolutely just pulled out of thin air.

I've met a lot of cops that were pleasant people socially but just add badge and gun to get corrupt, power-mad, 2-faced, lying b*****d.

Hope these kinds of cops realize that some of us have long memories.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 03:01 PM
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Originally posted by whitewave
My ex father-in-law was a cop in Oklahoma. My husband and I bought his old car from him with the license plates still attached. I admit there were times I was speeding and got pulled over.

During those times I'd admit that I was without excuse and that the officer had caught me red-handed. They'd always ask who I knew on the police force. When I'd tell them that my father in law was a cop they'd tell me to "slow down" and then send me on my way without any ticket or even a written warning.

Once we got rid of the car years later I started getting busted for things the cops just made up on the spot. No verbal warnings just tickets and arrests for things that aren't even against the law; things they absolutely just pulled out of thin air.

I've met a lot of cops that were pleasant people socially but just add badge and gun to get corrupt, power-mad, 2-faced, lying b*****d.

Hope these kinds of cops realize that some of us have long memories.



HA, a friend of mines father was Chief of Police of a large, local department I won't say the department cause it would be easy to find out who this was.

Regardless, he was attending the Art Institute, and after a long night of drinking was extremely intoxicated. When he got back to the art institute, he proceeded to do donuts in the parking lot then sped out of the lot to go somewhere.

Soon enough he had a cop in full pursuit. He pulled over the cop came to the window, upon realizing who he was, and fearing for his job the cop let my friend go without question even though he was extremely drunk and had broken several laws in the couple minutes the officer was observing.

It's just like when cops pull over off duty cops that are drunk. Do you realize how astonishingly low the actual DUI rates are? They would never give their friends a DUI, becuase it could be them in that position later on and they don't want that "favor" returned. So they drive them home, have their car driven home etc.

Cops are exempt from the same laws we must all abide by.

Recently, I was pulling upto a red light at a large overpass in my area. I see two cops speeding up behind me, they then suddenly switch to the next lane and arrive at the red light. They both flip on their lights, drive through the red light, then turn off the lights. As I watch them proceed there is an SUV in front of them, he too sees the police coming towards him. One top pulls up beside him on the stretch to the next light, the other cop pulls right up behind him tailgating. I thought FOR SURE they were after this guy and he was going down in flames.

The 3 of them arrive at the next light, The two cops again flip on their lights and speed through yet another red light. Then turn off their lights. Then they do the EXACT same thing at the third light on the overpass. Then they keep driving, nothing wrong, no emergency, no NOTHING.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 03:06 PM
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Originally posted by QBSneak000
Like I said, they are the biggest gang around.


You know, I was writing a blog entry about gangs, and I wanted to get an idea of what the "official" definition of the word was. The St. Clair County, Illinois Sheriff's Website defined a gang this way (the link to that site is now broken; it was www.sheriff.co.st-clair.il.us...:


gang is an organized group with a recognized leader whose activities are either criminal or, at the very least, threatening to the community. Unity, identity, loyalty and reward are normal characteristics that are admired, but when associated with gangs they become distorted. They are traits each gang shares in order to survive. Gangs display their identity and unity in obvious ways, such as the use of jewelry, selected colored clothing, jargon and signals. Members remain together in quiet times as well as in conflict. In response to this twisted loyalty, gang members are rewarded by being accepted and recognized as a gang member... It is a mistaken belief that gangs operate only in less affluent neighborhoods. Gangs exist in virtually every community.


The '...' indicates where I cut out a part about the gang's source of income being drugs. If you read this description, you'll see that there is no way to distinguish between a gang and the police. Police are an organized group with a recognized leader, whose activities are threatening to the community (and often illegal). They wear special jewelry (badges) and colors (uniforms), have jargon and signals (10-4, etc.), and hang together on and off work.

The difference between street gangs and the police isn't that great. True - I'd much rather have the police out there, than some street gang. The police at least have to explain themselves if they shoot me down like a dog; the gangs don't. It's not much protection, but I'll take what I can get.

But I have to say, contrary to what a number of other members have claimed, that bad cops are truly in the minority. I live in Chicago, not known for its service-oriented police force. These guys are not warm and fuzzy Care Bears. I worked for a time for one of Chicago's most prominent police misconduct attorneys, so I got to see plenty of the crap that happened out there. Plus, I've seen it first-hand, cops abusing me. There is a *lot* of police misconduct out there, but it is mostly committed by the same bad cops, over and over again.

Most of these police, however, are decent, relatively honest, hard-working people who just want to keep the streets safer for their families and for the citizens. Really. The only thing you could complain about is that many of these good cops turn a blind eye to the abuses committed by their partners and fellow officers. This is not based on criminality; it is based on survival.

They overlook these things because their lives may some day depend on that guy being right behind them during a dangerous time. So they'll overlook an unjust DUI or a beat-down, because their may lives depend on it. They shouldn't do that, of course. But I can't blame them for doing it, and I can't say that I'd be a perfect Boy Scout if I were in their shoes. Think: your life, or a guy getting beaten? Would you endanger your life, just to save someone from an unjust beating?

[edit on 7/29/2009 by chiron613]



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 03:21 PM
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Originally posted by ldyserenity
reply to post by Karlhungis
 

That's life, she should have not been on the road at all because she was drunk she will get exactly what she deserves...Period!
[edit on 29-7-2009 by ldyserenity]


Sorry, but that's not true. The law has specific penalties for DUI, which do not include trumped-up charges of causing an accident. The policeman was outside the law. He had absolutely no authority to decide her guilt or innocent, nor to decide on a penalty. His job was to arrest her for the DUI and take her in, and let the Courts decide what to do with her.

Certainly her breaking the law, did in no way justify the policeman's breaking the law. That reasoning is specious.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 03:25 PM
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reply to post by QBSneak000
 


Fair enough. I grant that there are the a-hole cops that make it bad for everyone and this impression makes it harder for everyone when the police get involved. Neither side (police/citizen) knows the other but both sides have already built in their mind a profile about the other and re-act based on that mindset.

Those that wear the shield are very protective of each other. I can't say that I blame them but I don't agree with the extremes that they go to for each other. But if you look at any profession, people make exceptions for their co-workers and some of those exceptions are abused which ruins it for everyone. Of course I am simplifying it but the general idea is there.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 03:26 PM
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Sadly to many officers are on a power-ego trip. Over the years I've worked with several people who expressed desires and eventually join local police forces. In each case the people they worked with considered them a lunatic and were afraid of what would happen when they got a gun.

Now this is not to say they are all bad, that is of course not true, however there are enough of them that are twisted in some way to give the rest a bad name.



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