Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Murray N. Rothbard Speech On Libertarianism

page: 1
2

log in

join

posted on Jul, 28 2009 @ 04:27 PM
link   


Keep in mind Wiki's information on economists and economic theory is dominated by statist economics professors that are predominately Keynesians.

They make their living off of government grants, government loans to students, and government paychecks, so naturally they will defend any economic theory that expands state power at the expense of the people.

With that in mind, here is wiki's description of Rothbard.

From Wiki

Murray Newton Rothbard (March 2, 1926 – January 7, 1995) was an American intellectual, individualist anarchist,[1] author, and economist of the Austrian School who helped define modern libertarianism and popularized a form of free-market anarchism he termed "anarcho-capitalism".[2][3] Building on the Austrian School's concept of spontaneous order in markets, support for a free market in money production, and condemnation of central planning,[4] Rothbard sought to minimize coercive government control of the economy and considered the monopoly force of government the greatest danger to liberty and the long-term wellbeing of the populace.[5][6][7]

Rothbard concluded that taxation represents theft on a grand scale, and "a compulsory monopoly of force" prohibiting the voluntary procurement of defense and judicial services.[5] He also considered central banking and fractional reserve banking under a fiat money system a form of institutionalized, legalized financial fraud, antithetical to libertarian principles and ethics.[8][9][10] Rothbard opposed military, political, and economic interventionism in the affairs of other nations.[11][12] Rothbard wrote over twenty books before his death in 1995.



If you are a libertarian or simply a person that believes the constitution should be followed, Rothbard is someone you should study. He did a tremendous amount of work flushing out Austrian economic theory.




posted on Jul, 28 2009 @ 04:52 PM
link   
reply to post by mnemeth1
 


I love this brilliant man, and I've read many of his works. He's simply a genius that went against the establishment, thus he is relegated to relative obscurity. Everyone should read his stuff. It should be required reading in our schools.





 
2

log in

join