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A true UFOB & UAP & AOP video capture ?

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posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 04:05 PM
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One thing I noticed is that the movement is not uniform, it looks like there is a missing frame from time to time.

I also noticed that the brightness of the lights change not only with the turn but also during the descent and it looks like there is a little perspective effect after the turn, as if was only one object with two lights.

But it's a little hard to tell from the smallish (640x427) compressed video.

Edit: I forgot that there was another link for the video on the second post, and that video is slightly bigger (720x480) and in WMV, better than FLV.

[edit on 29/7/2009 by ArMaP]




posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 04:18 PM
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Now, let's get back to the insect hypothesis :

Just a recall of what Mr Sonota said about this video capture :




it is not insects season here. Sorry. Usually, insects are recorded as completely different style. Because they are small, only insects that fly near the camera can be observed. They never be recorded with clear shapes because near side is out of focus. And the angular velocity is much higher because they are near.


Now, I do have a few insects videos taken from the same ccd video camera :

S2 : s263.photobucket.com...

S2 : s263.photobucket.com...

S2 : www.youtube.com...

Cheers,
Europa





[edit on 29-7-2009 by Europa733]



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by Europa733
 


So are you guys talking about the two birds?

Viewing the .wmv file on an HD monitor, I can make out the wings flapping after they slow down and fly out of the frame. The sun is very low so we are talking white birds here, lit from below due to the time of day. They do not remain equidistant although it is close, but then I've seen birds fly in unison so often it is normal.

I increased the size to full screen and I still see two birds.

Without the original uncompressed footage, I'll have to stick with the birds assumption. The edges are fairly sharp so the power lines give an inkling of size which is bird sized.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by Blaine91555
reply to post by Europa733
 


So are you guys talking about the two birds?

Viewing the .wmv file on an HD monitor, I can make out the wings flapping after they slow down and fly out of the frame. The sun is very low so we are talking white birds here, lit from below due to the time of day. They do not remain equidistant although it is close, but then I've seen birds fly in unison so often it is normal.

I increased the size to full screen and I still see two birds.

Without the original uncompressed footage, I'll have to stick with the birds assumption. The edges are fairly sharp so the power lines give an inkling of size which is bird sized.


Here is what Mr Sonota thinks & said :




Though the movement is rather tricky, now we are thinking the most probable explanation of this event is a pair of birds. Because... 1. Many birds or bats that are lighted by ground lights have been captured by this camera. 2. Some movement like faction can be seen on the last part of the video. 3. The imaged curvature is very large against its angular velocity. 4. There are no simultaneous observation reported though this area is observed by several stations. 5. 3. 4. means that this event happens within the distance of a few hundred meters.


I did write to an ornitologist that I frequently "hassle" with ufo pictures & blurfos. His answer was simple; if the video was filmed in real time, there's no way that a bird or a pair of birds could go from nose diving to level flight in less that 0.5" with such a radical angle.

Excuse my poor translation (from french).

Nablator will tell you why you thought about birds (flapping). He knows video cameras way better than I do but it sure is an hypothesis to keep in mind in order to try to fully dismiss it.

Cheers,
Europa



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 05:57 PM
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Here is a slow-motion version that may help.

Or maybe not.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 06:07 PM
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Thanks ArMaP. Now I think I understand why this may look like flapping wings. The video is interlaced. You are seeing half lines from one frame and half from the next. This gives the lights a jagged appearance.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 06:34 PM
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A deinterlaced version:
img190.imageshack.us...

Processed in Registax:



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 06:41 PM
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Originally posted by Europa733
Here is what Mr Sonota thinks & said :

The dark shape between the two lights is difficult to explain with two birds -- unless they are holding a picnic basket.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 06:56 PM
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reply to post by nablator
 


I think that would be even stranger than an alien spaceship.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 07:13 PM
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reply to post by Europa733
 


Thanks. I clearly agree with Mr. Sonata. It is birds.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 07:14 PM
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reply to post by nablator
 


Compression artifacts. Google how anti-aliasing and compression work.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 07:23 PM
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reply to post by nablator
 


De-interlacing is giving you false images. First you have the compression artifacts to factor in and then on top of that filtering is thrown in.

On De-interlacing.

There are various methods to deinterlace video, each producing different problems or artifacts of their own. Some methods are much cleaner in artifacts than other methods. All are indeed not equal.

Most de-interlacing techniques can be broken up into three different groups all using their own exact techniques. The first group are called Field Combination De-interlacers, because they take the even and odd fields and combine them into one image or frame which is then displayed. The second group are called Field Extension De-interlacers because each field (with only half the lines) is extended to the entire screen to make a frame. The third type use a combination of both and fall under the banner of Motion Compensation and a number of other names.


You see through using a compressed image to begin with and then throwing a de-interlacing filter not even meant for this purpose, you get false data in the image. De-interlacing should only be used on uncompressed originals. Even then it produces artifacts of its own.



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 04:08 AM
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Originally posted by Blaine91555
You see through using a compressed image to begin with and then throwing a de-interlacing filter not even meant for this purpose, you get false data in the image. De-interlacing should only be used on uncompressed originals. Even then it produces artifacts of its own.

You're perfectly right. I used the deinterlace filter in VirtualDub on the high quality, but compressed 90 MB version. I don't claim this deinterlacing makes a perfect video without any artifact. However, not deinterlacing leaves the unwanted comb artifact.

I see no evidence of flapping wings in the deinterlaced video.



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 04:24 AM
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Originally posted by Blaine91555
Compression artifacts.

Good idea, I'd really like to be convinced about this. A little experiment is needed. I'll try it tonight.



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 02:07 PM
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I wanted to compare with a video of two small lights produced by a different camera. But the compression in the Sonota video is YUV packed 422, not MJPEG as in my camera.
en.wikipedia.org...

The bitrate is 165 Mb/s. That's 16 bits per pixel !
Compression artifacts are extremely low with such a bitrate.

A video recorded with my Canon Powershot camera at the highest quality setting has a bitrate of 15 Mbits/s, 1.6 bits / pixel.

There is no realistic way to compare the two.



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 03:03 PM
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Originally posted by Blaine91555
reply to post by Europa733
 


Thanks. I clearly agree with Mr. Sonata. It is birds.


Hi there,

When a bird (or insect) falls (nose diving), it reaches what is called terminal velocity => (constant steady speed). In order to decelerate, birds need to flap their wings as if they were about to land which make them change their trajectory. Then can also decelerate by radically changing their trajectory without flapping their wings.

Here is what we got :



There sure is a slight change of trajectory from point a to point b. Is it enough to make the bird(s) decelerate ? Are birds able to decelerate to Vspeed = 0 in < 1.5" with just only a slight change of trajectory ?

These are questions (and many more) that need to be asked to some biophysicians specialized in biomechanics and to people developing software (simulators) that intend to model with some degree of accuracy the flight dynamics of birds and to render it in real-time in a 3D environment.

Cheers,
Europa

[edit on 30-7-2009 by Europa733]



posted on Jul, 31 2009 @ 07:18 AM
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Thanks for all your work on this very interesting case, Europa733 & Nablator.

This is extremely interesting reading.



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