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Space station silhouette

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posted on Jul, 28 2009 @ 04:33 PM
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Awesome pic! Thanks!




posted on Jul, 28 2009 @ 06:23 PM
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Now... if ya want fake- I can provide fake.



There's a fake. ;-P

I wish I could afford a setup like that. I cant afford either telescope OR camera, sadly enough.

[edit on 28-7-2009 by wylekat]



posted on Jul, 28 2009 @ 07:48 PM
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This picture is really great. Most of them look really small and fuzzy, this is nice. It is still amazing that the space station is there at all, you know?
>^..^



posted on Jul, 28 2009 @ 07:55 PM
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It is amazing the quality of this, you can even see the shuttles payload arm in use. I wonder if one day we will be able to get one with enough quality and at the right time to capture a space walk and maybe get an astronauts silhouette, there may even been one happening at the time this was taken. Maybe but probably not.



posted on Jul, 28 2009 @ 08:22 PM
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Neat.

I find it amazing how they got a perfect shot of 1 side of it as if it were flat. Lucky shot I assume. It kinda looks like a sun spot.

That satellite must be far out since the sun is huge in that picture. I mean the suns 96 million miles away.



posted on Jul, 28 2009 @ 09:40 PM
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Originally posted by Kadzait
Neat.

I find it amazing how they got a perfect shot of 1 side of it as if it were flat. Lucky shot I assume.

If you think about it, just about any shot showing the ISS in front of the sun, particularly if you properly position yourself so it goes over the center of the sun from your POV, will make the ISS appear "flat" in the sense that you're looking perpendicularly into the flat solar panels. As long as the solar panels are all tracking the sun properly, if ISS is between you and the sun, you should be looking straight up into the panels in such a way as to make them look "flat" and wide.
Another example:
www.seeingafterdark.com...
This "guaranteed geometry" is not necessarily the case with ISS lunar transits, however:
www.guidescope.net...
It's tiny, but you can tell you're looking at it from one side.


That satellite must be far out since the sun is huge in that picture. I mean the suns 96 million miles away.

It's all about the focal length of the telescope, and yes, distance of the station. You can make the same effect happen with earth-bound objects if you have a long enough focal length ("magnification") and a bit of distance to play with. The effect is often exploited in movies:
3.bp.blogspot.com...
Not a true "camera trick," but still inspired by it:
boxwish.com...

[edit on 28-7-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Jul, 28 2009 @ 09:51 PM
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Originally posted by pazcat
It is amazing the quality of this, you can even see the shuttles payload arm in use. I wonder if one day we will be able to get one with enough quality and at the right time to capture a space walk and maybe get an astronauts silhouette,

Well, Ralph Vandebergh captured the reflection of a spacewalker's spacesuit at night, so anything's possible.
images.astronet.ru...



posted on Jul, 28 2009 @ 10:47 PM
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Very nice picture OP!!

It is truly amazing what kind of perspectives we can get in the vastness of space.



posted on Jul, 28 2009 @ 11:39 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


It appears that the connection from the center of the satellite to the solar panels on the upper part from the POV seems to be slightly shorter then the lower connections from the center of the satellite to the solar panels makes me believe that the picture is coming from an angle. Of course this is a 2d picture so there cannot be any angles recognized. Especially with an image that has little detail in it.

Then again the placement of the satellite in the image can give the illusion that its coming from an angle. The silhouette effect makes it look flat.

Thanks for the insight.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 01:20 AM
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Whats the big deal.. its just practise flares set off by a-10 warthogs. nothing to see. that bubble in the back is just swamp gas.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 01:26 AM
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Found this on the link you provided...What is this flying into Jupiter?...not the astroid/comet!

spaceweather.com...

THis?

spaceweather.com...

and this?

spaceweather.com...

Sorry if it's off topic but I thought someone here might know what it is



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 06:05 AM
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That would have been nice too see.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 06:08 AM
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reply to post by wylekat
 

Now if i seen that image in my telescope lens i would know i have been watching too many episodes of statrek.One the other hand maybe my friends played a prank on me and stuck a image of that ship on my telescope lens.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 06:44 AM
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reply to post by Oustlaw
 


I would think it is one of the 63 moons that Jupiter has.
Just at a guess.
Infact on second glance its the moon Io, its mentioned on the second link.

[edit on 29-7-2009 by pazcat]



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 08:21 AM
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reply to post by GORGANTHIUM
 


I have one of the Death Star, too.
I mean no disrespect at all to the person who got these images (which is why the only thing I copy/ pasted was the Enterprise. I made my own sun, ect)- I wouldn't be able to catch something like this. All I have is the next best thing: A fun spoof or 2.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 09:57 AM
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Originally posted by Oustlaw
Found this on the link you provided...What is this flying into Jupiter?...not the astroid/comet!

spaceweather.com...

THis?

spaceweather.com...

and this?

spaceweather.com...

Sorry if it's off topic but I thought someone here might know what it is

As pazcat pointed out above, it's one of Jupiter's moons. You can actually see Jupiters' 4 big moons from Earth with a relatively cheap telescope or simply good binoculars.

I'd like to add this: in your second link there was a shadow visible that was moving with that object (not the "scar" but the other dark spot). That dark spot was the shadow cast by that moon.

Here's another example of a a moon of Jupiter (Io) casting a shadow:
Io Shadow



posted on Jul, 30 2009 @ 07:09 AM
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ALL I CAN SAY IS THAT IS "BEAUTIFUL"



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